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Formalizing natural languages [electronic resource] : the NooJ approach

Endeca eBooks Last Week - Mon, 2016-04-11 00:00

Author: Silberztein, Max, author.
Published: London : ISTE ; Hoboken, NJ : John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2016.

Currently held at: DUKE

Game theory in action : an introduction to classical and evolutionary models

Endeca eBooks Last Week - Mon, 2016-04-11 00:00

Author: Schecter, Stephen, 1947- author.
Published: Princeton : Princeton University Press, [2016]

Currently held at: DUKE

Leadership lessons from compelling contexts

Endeca eBooks Last Week - Mon, 2016-04-11 00:00

Published: Bingley, UK : Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016.

Currently held at: DUKE

Opportunities in 5G networks : a research and development perspective

Endeca eBooks Last Week - Mon, 2016-04-11 00:00

Published: Boca Raton : Taylor & Francis, CRC Press, 2016.

Currently held at: DUKE

Serious nonsense : groundhog lodges, Versammlinge, and Pennsylvania German heritage

Endeca eBooks Last Week - Mon, 2016-04-11 00:00

Author: Donner, William Wilkinson, author.
Published: University Park, Pennsylvania : The Pennsylvania State University Press, [2016]

Currently held at: DUKE

Analysis of sub-synchronous resonance (SSR) in doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG)-based wind farms

Endeca eBooks Last Week - Mon, 2016-04-11 00:00

Author: Mohammadpour, Hossein Ali, author.
Published: San Rafael, California : Morgan & Claypool Publishers, [2015]

Currently held at: DUKE

Promoting better lifetime planning through financial education

Endeca eBooks Last Week - Mon, 2016-04-11 00:00

Published: New Jersey : World Scientific, [2015]

Currently held at: DUKE

Ball don't lie! : myth, genealogy, and invention in the cultures of basketball

test-endeca-feed - Mon, 2016-04-11 00:00

Author: Colás, Santiago, 1965- author.
Published: Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2016.

Currently held at: DUKE

Multivariate frailty models for multi-type recurrent event data and its application to cancer prevention trial

Scopus Query (for science portal) - Fri, 2016-04-08 23:43
Author(s):Bedair, K. | Hong, Y. | Li, J. | Al-Khalidi, H.R.<br>Publication year: 2016<br>Journal / Book title: Computational Statistics and Data Analysis<br><br>Access <a href="http://www.scopus.com/results/results.url?sort=plf-f&src=s&nlo=1&nlr=20&nls=&affilName=duke&sid=50C4CC75DD91BE54EF957326B03AC936.WeLimyRvBMk2ky9SFKc8Q%3a330&sot=afnl&sdt=cl&cluster=scopubyr%2c%222016%22%2ct%2c%222015%22%2ct%2bscosubtype%2c%22ar%22%2ct%2c%22ip%22%2ct%2c%22re%22%2ct%2c%22ch%22%2ct%2bscosubjabbr%2c%22ARTS%22%2cf%2c%22ECON%22%2cf%2c%22BUSI%22%2cf&sl=207&s=%28AF-ID%28%22Duke+University%22+60008724%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22P.M.+Gross+Chemical+Laboratory%22+60019814%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+University+Marine+Laboratory%22+60020096%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+Institute+for+Genome+Sciences+%26+Policy%22+60076653%29%29&origin=rssreader">all results</a> for your search in Scopus<br>

Digital Resources: Allen Building Activism

Bitstreams - Fri, 2016-04-08 18:54

Allen BuildingDuke University has a long history of student activism, and the University Archives actively collects materials to document these movements.  With the administration’s offices residing in the Allen Building, this is not the first time it is the center of activism activity.  The Allen Building Study-In occurred November 13, 1967, the Allen Building Takeover occurred February 13, 1969, and … Continue reading Digital Resources: Allen Building Activism

The post Digital Resources: Allen Building Activism appeared first on Bitstreams: The Digital Collections Blog.

Quick Pic: Tiny Tin

Preservation Underground - Fri, 2016-04-08 17:10

We currently have a small collection of late 19th and early 20th century cosmetic samples from our Advertising Ephemera Collection in the lab for stabilization and rehousing. The majority of the samples are little paper envelopes with loose powder inside, but one of them contained a fun little surprise.

Paper packet

This sample of Charles Meyer Exora Rouge was quite a bit thicker than the others and I could feel a tiny, rigid container inside. The adhesive on the envelope flap was easily released and inside was the smallest tin I’ve ever seen.

Tin in Hand

I don’t know exactly when this item was manufactured, but the bottom left of this page from a 1907 issue of the New York Clipper features an advertisement for free samples of Exora Rouge.

Tin Measurements

You just never know what you will find!

The post Quick Pic: Tiny Tin appeared first on Preservation Underground.

VFF: iCheck: Interactive Exploration of How Congress Votes

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2016-04-08 16:00
Fri, Apr 08, 2016
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
LSRC D106
In this talk, we will give an overview of how U.S. Congressional voting records are used in election cycles to attack candidates, and demonstrate how our tool, iCheck, lets you "fact-check" such claims by exploring and breaking down how legislators vote with political parties and the President, over issues of importance to different special-interest groups, and more. We will also describe some challenges of working with this data and making our analyses efficient and responsive.

VFF: Visualization Friday Forum

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2016-04-08 16:00
Fri, Apr 08, 2016
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

Establishing a pragmatic framework to optimise health outcomes in heart failure and multimorbidity (ARISE-HF): A multidisciplinary position statement

Scopus Query (for science portal) - Thu, 2016-04-07 23:29
Author(s):Stewart, S. | Riegel, B. | Boyd, C. | Ahamed, Y. | Thompson, D.R. | Burrell, L.M. | Carrington, M.J. | Coats, A. | Granger, B.B. | Hides, J. | Weintraub, W.S. | Moser, D.K. | Dickson, V.V. | McDermott, C.J. | Keates, A.K. | Rich, M.W.<br>Publication year: 2016<br>Journal / Book title: International Journal of Cardiology<br><br>Access <a href="http://www.scopus.com/results/results.url?sort=plf-f&src=s&nlo=1&nlr=20&nls=&affilName=duke&sid=50C4CC75DD91BE54EF957326B03AC936.WeLimyRvBMk2ky9SFKc8Q%3a330&sot=afnl&sdt=cl&cluster=scopubyr%2c%222016%22%2ct%2c%222015%22%2ct%2bscosubtype%2c%22ar%22%2ct%2c%22ip%22%2ct%2c%22re%22%2ct%2c%22ch%22%2ct%2bscosubjabbr%2c%22ARTS%22%2cf%2c%22ECON%22%2cf%2c%22BUSI%22%2cf&sl=207&s=%28AF-ID%28%22Duke+University%22+60008724%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22P.M.+Gross+Chemical+Laboratory%22+60019814%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+University+Marine+Laboratory%22+60020096%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+Institute+for+Genome+Sciences+%26+Policy%22+60076653%29%29&origin=rssreader">all results</a> for your search in Scopus<br>

Demography and population growth rate of the tree Prosopis flexuosa with contrasting grazing regimes in the Central Monte Desert

Scopus Query (for science portal) - Thu, 2016-04-07 23:29
Author(s):Aschero, V. | Morris, W.F. | Vázquez, D.P. | Alvarez, J.A. | Villagra, P.E.<br>Publication year: 2016<br>Journal / Book title: Forest Ecology and Management<br><br>Access <a href="http://www.scopus.com/results/results.url?sort=plf-f&src=s&nlo=1&nlr=20&nls=&affilName=duke&sid=50C4CC75DD91BE54EF957326B03AC936.WeLimyRvBMk2ky9SFKc8Q%3a330&sot=afnl&sdt=cl&cluster=scopubyr%2c%222016%22%2ct%2c%222015%22%2ct%2bscosubtype%2c%22ar%22%2ct%2c%22ip%22%2ct%2c%22re%22%2ct%2c%22ch%22%2ct%2bscosubjabbr%2c%22ARTS%22%2cf%2c%22ECON%22%2cf%2c%22BUSI%22%2cf&sl=207&s=%28AF-ID%28%22Duke+University%22+60008724%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22P.M.+Gross+Chemical+Laboratory%22+60019814%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+University+Marine+Laboratory%22+60020096%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+Institute+for+Genome+Sciences+%26+Policy%22+60076653%29%29&origin=rssreader">all results</a> for your search in Scopus<br>

Holding specific views with humility: Conceptualization and measurement of specific intellectual humility

Scopus Query (for science portal) - Thu, 2016-04-07 23:29
Author(s):Hoyle, R.H. | Davisson, E.K. | Diebels, K.J. | Leary, M.R.<br>Publication year: 2016<br>Journal / Book title: Personality and Individual Differences<br><br>Access <a href="http://www.scopus.com/results/results.url?sort=plf-f&src=s&nlo=1&nlr=20&nls=&affilName=duke&sid=50C4CC75DD91BE54EF957326B03AC936.WeLimyRvBMk2ky9SFKc8Q%3a330&sot=afnl&sdt=cl&cluster=scopubyr%2c%222016%22%2ct%2c%222015%22%2ct%2bscosubtype%2c%22ar%22%2ct%2c%22ip%22%2ct%2c%22re%22%2ct%2c%22ch%22%2ct%2bscosubjabbr%2c%22ARTS%22%2cf%2c%22ECON%22%2cf%2c%22BUSI%22%2cf&sl=207&s=%28AF-ID%28%22Duke+University%22+60008724%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22P.M.+Gross+Chemical+Laboratory%22+60019814%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+University+Marine+Laboratory%22+60020096%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+Institute+for+Genome+Sciences+%26+Policy%22+60076653%29%29&origin=rssreader">all results</a> for your search in Scopus<br>

Archive Opening and Lecture with John Palfrey

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-04-07 21:00
Thu, Apr 07, 2016
5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
Join the Duke University Libraries as we celebrate the opening of the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Archive with a special lecture featuring educator and technology expert John Palfrey, distinguished authority on education and technology and author of "BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google" (Basic Books, 2015). Palfrey is the Head of School at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. He is also a faculty co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. Previously, Palfrey served as Vice Dean for Library and Information Resources at Harvard Law School and as the founding chairman of the Digital Public Library of America. He has written extensively on internet law, intellectual property, and the potential of new technologies to strengthen democracies locally and around the world. Palfrey's talk will be followed by a brief response by N. Katherine Hayles, James B. Duke Professor of Literature at Duke and author of numerous books, including "How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis" (University of Chicago, 2012).

Assessments in Sakai 11

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-04-07 19:00
Thu, Apr 7, 2016
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
To be announced
Come to this workshop to learn how to use Tests & Quizzes and the Gradebook in Sakai 11.  The session will cover using the new Gradebook interface, navigating the redesigned settings area for Tests & Quizzes in addition to a new question type and delivery options for assessments.

CIT Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-04-07 17:00
Thu, Apr 7, 2016
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning.

Meet the Staff: Laura Wagner, Radio Haiti Project Archivist

Rubenstein Technical Services - Thu, 2016-04-07 15:30
IMG_4899

IMG_4899

 Laura Wagner is the Project Archivist for the Radio Haiti Archives. She joined the Rubenstein in 2015. She has a PhD in anthropology from UNC. Her dissertation is about the 2010 earthquake and its long aftermath: how did people’s everyday lives and social worlds change (or not change) in the wake of the disaster and displacement? How do people get by in an aid economy? How did Haitian people and non-Haitian interveners make sense of the humanitarian response and its failures?  She also wrote a YA novel, Hold Tight, Don’t Let Go , which deals with some of the same issues. Her interests include Haiti, literary fiction and nonfiction, humanitarianism, human rights, and social justice. She has been a frequent contributor to the Devil’s Tale since joining the RL. 

How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a party?  To fellow librarians and library staff?

At parties I say “I work on the archives of Haiti’s first independent radio station.”  Then that confuses them and they think I’m doing research in the archives, and I have to clarify that I’m processing the materials.  Then they generally want to know why these materials live at Duke.  And if I’m at a party in Haiti, people then want to talk to about their own memories of Radio Haiti and of Jean Dominique, and they ask me if the station will ever reopen. To librarians and library staff, I say I’m a project archivist who never trained as an archivist.

What led you to working in libraries?

This project.  I had never worked in a library before.  I began working on this project as an external contractor for the Forum for Scholars and Publics, which was collaborating with the Library to create a public-facing pilot website with a small sample of the Radio Haiti recordings.  When the opportunity to apply for the Project Archivist job came along, I applied.  I had already decided that if it was possible, I wanted to work on this project full time.  Temperamentally and experientially, I am probably a bit of an outlier among the library set.

Tell us about your relationship to Radio Haiti. How has it evolved since taking on this position?

Jean Dominique, Michèle Montas, and other members of the Radio Haiti team had numbered among my heroes since I first started learning about Haiti and learning Haitian Creole, back in 2004.  I never could have imagined that one day I would have the opportunity to work on preserving the work of Radio Haiti.  The first time I met Michèle, in April 2014, I was embarrassingly giddy. It is a huge honor to work on this project.

I’m learning a lot about late twentieth century Haiti, in a very granular way.  I already knew the major events and trends, the main themes, but always analytically and in hindsight.  It’s a very different experience to learn about events through real-time, day-to-day reporting, done by people who did not yet know the outcome of the story.  It’s fascinating, but also often sad and frustrating because you see the same things happening over and over and over again, until today.  The same injustices, the same impunity, though sometimes it “repaints its face”, to use a phrase that Jean Dominique uses.

 How does your work at the Rubenstein influence your approach to research and writing?

I was a researcher and writer before I started working on this project, so I have to keep myself in check; I cannot follow my instincts and desires by letting myself act as a researcher and writer when my job, for the moment, is to be processing the archive.  That said,  I hope to someday write something substantial about this archive.  I can also say that my experience as a researcher and writer influences my approach to processing this archive.  I want it all to be clear and transparent; I want to provide context and thematic guidance for future researchers and listeners.  Working on the Radio Haiti archive has been a huge learning experience for me, and I want to impart as much of that knowledge as possible to others down the line, by incorporating that knowledge into the structure and description of the archive.

IMG_4909

What does an average day at RL look like for you? 

Because this is a single project with a clear goal and endpoint, and with defined stages, my typical workday varies depending on what we’re working on.  These days I am mostly working through Radio Haiti’s paper archive.  So I get to work, answer some email, and start organizing the papers, removing the faded invisible Thermofax pages, sorting them by subject and year.  I have two excellent undergraduate assistants this semester, both Haitian, who are starting to listen to and describe some of the recordings.  I am very eager to finish processing the papers so I can focus on the audio full-time.  I also spend part of the day thinking about broader questions of access — how we’re going to make this collection as available and accessible as possible to people in Haiti, given the social and infrastructural realities there.  I am very eager to begin working on the recordings full-time, of course.

IMG_4896Laura working alongside her student assistant Tanya Thomas.

What do you like best about your job? What excites you most?

What excites me the most is that I am helping keep this important work alive, making it accessible to people in Haiti and beyond. And I just really like the experience of listening to the recordings.  Sometimes it’s hard for me to listen as an archivist, rather than as a researcher and writer.  So it’s fun when I get to write a blog entry about the project, and synthesize and put together different parts of the archive, translate some excerpts, and provide context to people who may not already know the story of Radio Haiti.  As I said, it’s a great honor to work on this collection, to be entrusted with this collection.  As Michèle says, part of Jean’s soul is here.

What might people find surprising about your job?

I think it depends on the person. For people who aren’t used to processing archival collections (id est most people), I think they’d be surprised at how much physical restoration, intellectual labor and time this job takes.  A lot of people want the Radio Haiti collection to be available as soon as possible.  (I’m one of them!) And many people don’t understand why we can’t do it instantly.

What is the most challenging aspect of your job?

I have two answers to that, which are sort of incommensurate with one another.  In a day-to-day sense, it can be tedious, and I sometimes feel isolated in this work.  Radio Haiti itself was a team effort — it was a social, collaborative, interactive entity, an act of ongoing solidarity, both in terms of the journalists and their audience… and the audience was nearly all of Haiti.  So engaging with that work in my cubicle in a converted tobacco warehouse in Durham, North Carolina, can feel lonely.  At the same time, I feel connected to the people who appear in the tapes, across time and space, even across life and death.  Which brings me to the second challenging aspect of this job, which is actually the same as my favorite thing about the job: the weight of history, the weight of memory.  This collection is a huge part of Haitian national heritage. And so much of it is sad, frustrating and infuriating — there is so much injustice, suffering, and absurdity in this archive.  Sometimes it’s emotionally difficult to listen to these things — though Jean Dominique’s incisive intellect and humor make it easier.  It sounds strange, but I laugh all the time.

IMG_4920Laura surveys her boxes

Do you have a favorite piece or collection at The Rubenstein? Why?

Well, the Radio Haiti collection is obviously my favorite collection, for all the reasons I’ve mentioned.  I’m not intimately familiar with the other collections, but the National Coalition for Haitian Rights archive has some fascinating material in it that often complements the Radio Haiti collection.  And I like all the History of Medicine collections, especially Benjamin Rush papers, which are poignant, and the creepy suede baby + placenta.

Where can you be found when you’re not working?

Cooking dinner with friends, baking cakes, drinking a beer, vaguely working on novel #2, vaguely revising my dissertation, singing in the car, asking my cats why they are thundering hither and yon at 2 am.  I like making silly little greeting cards for friends; I’ve been thinking about taking an actual art class or something.  I’d like to know how to access all the other seasons of the Great British Baking Show.  And I’ve started running as of late, at which I am truly mediocre.  It’s liberating to do something you know you have no hope of being good at.

What book is on your nightstand/in your carryall right now?

There’s a stack!  I’ve been slowly savoring the Complete Stories of Clarice Lispector for a few weeks, but it’s a bit heavy to carry around.

Interview conducted and edited by Katrina Martin.

The post Meet the Staff: Laura Wagner, Radio Haiti Project Archivist appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

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