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Poverty in a rising Africa [electronic resource]

Endeca eBooks Last Week - Sun, 2016-07-03 00:00

Author: Beegle, Kathleen, 1969-
Published: Washington DC : World Bank Group, [2016]

Currently held at: DUKE

Repository Mega-Migration Update

Bitstreams - Fri, 2016-07-01 15:34

BBB6054We are shouting it from the roof tops: The migration from Fedora 3 to Fedora 4 is complete!  And Digital Repository Services are not the only ones relieved.  We appreciate the understanding that our colleagues and users have shown as they’ve been inconvenienced while we’ve built a more resilient, more durable, more sustainable preservation platform in … Continue reading Repository Mega-Migration Update

The post Repository Mega-Migration Update appeared first on Bitstreams: The Digital Collections Blog.

Extreme Enclosures, part 2

Preservation Underground - Fri, 2016-07-01 14:00

Written by Tedd Anderson, Conservation Technician

Welcome to Part Two of EXTREME ENCLOSURES:  Miniatures.

If you ever want to feel like some sort of extreme being (a giant, perhaps, or even better:  Andre the Giant), you may want to take a gander at the tiniest books that Rubenstein Library has to offer: the miniatures.  The raw power you feel when holding five leather bound books in the palm of your hand is astounding.  Rubenstein has almost two hundred miniature books.  These little guys, known as The Minis, are often bullied by the notorious “big boys of the stacks.” Once again, Conservation has to step in to take care of at-risk books.  We needed to help the Minis bulk up so they are not beat up by larger books or lost in the wild (albeit highly climate controlled) world of the stacks.

handful of miniaturesDo not let the sense of “being huge” go to your head when handling the miniatures.

The miniatures had previously been housed in folders within document boxes; usually a dozen or so in each box.   One may handle multiple volumes before finding the one they wish to access.  Once the desired volume is finally found, it can be easily lost due to its miniscule size.  To facilitate handling we wanted to house them individually in standard size corrugated clamshell boxes (aka “pizza boxes” or “drop spine boxes.”). First we had to decide on what that standard size would be.

The height of the standard box was set by the 8-inch-high shelves. To determine the width and depth of the standard box, I measured each miniature to find the largest amongst them.  I settled on a standard box that would measure 6 inches x 1.75 inches x 4 inches.  An added advantage to a standard box is the ability to batch tasks.  I would measure, cut, and crease 30 or so clamshells at a time, saving a lot of time.

batch of boxesA pride of Minis in their new homes.

 

creased corrugatedThe highly sought after “batch stack.”

Once I had the standard clamshells figured, I had to determine how to settle the books into their new houses without them rattling around.  I wanted to keep the inserts simple and intuitive.  After a few experiments, I chose a two-tiered system of spacers made from corrugated board adhered with double stick tape.  I added Volara and 10 point card stock tabs to further stabilize when necessary.  Watch as this Mini “Addresses of Lincoln” gets a house.

measuringI used the Mini to determine the height and width of the first spacer. spacersInserting the first spacer with double stick tape.

 

spacersI used the space left in the box to determine the size of the 2nd spacer. spacersThe Mini-Two-Tier-System™.

 

volaraInserting Volara. Those Minis love a good foam party.

 

paper tabI used the height and width of the Volara recess to determine the tab size.

 

paper tabThe tab allows for easy retrieval of the Mini.

When finishing up the nearly two hundred enclosures for all these vulnerable Minis I rejoiced.  Knowing how intimidating  other large volumes can be to the slighter books in the collection, it’s nice to know a conservation technician can make a petite book’s size anxiety just a little less extreme.  I am comforted that the Minis now rest easy: safely tucked away in their soft foam and supportive board havens, never to feel lost or intimidated again.

vulnerable miniA vulnerable mini prior to receiving a house.

Several adequately housed Minis basking in their new security:

example

example pt

15 example pt4

12 example pt1


Be sure to visit part one of Extreme Enclosures: Boxing the Audubons.

 

 

The post Extreme Enclosures, part 2 appeared first on Preservation Underground.

Bringing Radio Haiti Home, One Step at a Time

Rubenstein Technical Services - Fri, 2016-07-01 13:58
bridge

This post originally appeared on H-Net on June 29, 2016.

In June 2016, with the processing of the Radio Haiti archive well underway but only partially completed, we took another big step in bringing Radio Haiti home. I traveled to Haiti to present the archive project at the Caribbean Studies Association (CSA) and Association of Caribbean University, Research, and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL) conferences, both of which were held in Port-au-Prince during the same week, and brought with me a thousand flash drives. Each flash drive contains a small sample of twenty-nine Radio Haiti programs, and is emblazoned with Radio Haiti’s iconic microphone-inspired vèvè logo and the permanent URL of the collection’s finding aid.

radiohaitiflashdrivesRadio Haiti flash drives at the Université d’État d’Haïti campus in Limonade. Photo courtesy of the MIT-Haiti Initiative

The contents of the flash drives span nearly thirty years, from 1973 to 2002. It includes subjects ranging from the Battle of Vertières and the Haitian Revolution, the annual vodou pilgrimage to Saut d’Eau, the brutality of the Duvalier regime, the tribulations of Haitian refugees at sea, the 1987 Jean Rabel massacre, the persecution of Haitian cane-cutters in the Dominican Republic, the aftermath of the coup years, agrarian reform in the mid-1990s, women’s rights, and the search for justice in the assassination of Jean Dominique and tributes to the slain journalist. It includes the voices of journalists, writers, human rights activists, rural farmers, artists, and intellectuals. Jean Dominique, Michèle Montas, Richard Brisson, Madeleine Paillère, J.J. Dominique, Konpè Filo, Jean-Marie Vincent, Michel-Rolph Trouillot, and Myriam Merlet, among others. Each flash drive also contains a PDF containing a full list of the contents, and links to our permanent finding aid, Soundcloud site, Facebook page, and the trilingual pilot website.

Collaborators, friends, and fellow travelers, including the Fondasyon Konesans ak Libète (FOKAL), the MIT-Haiti Initiative, AlterPresse, and Fanm Deside (among others!) are helping distribute the flash drives throughout the country. Our goal is for copies to be available in various schools, universities, community radio and alternative media outlets, community libraries, grassroots organizations, cultural organizations, and women’s organizations from Cité Soleil to Jérémie to Cap Haïtien to Jacmel to Gonaïves to La Gonâve. In 2017, when the Radio Haiti archive is completely digitized and processed, we will give digital copies of the entire archive to the Archives Nationales, the Bibliothèque Nationale, the network of community radio stations SAKS, FOKAL, and other major institutions.

twoarchivistsfromanhTwo archivists from the Archives Nationales d’Haïti, Yves-André Nau and Yves Rijkaard Gaspard, with project archivist Laura Wagner, at the ACURIL conference

Radio Haiti’s digital archive is not only for scholars writing about Haiti; it isn’t even principally for them. It is for everyone. Radio in Haiti in general, and Radio Haiti in particular, was and is fundamentally democratic. The technology is relatively inexpensive. Even if you don’t have a radio yourself, a relative, a friend, or a neighbor does. Radio doesn’t depend on traditional literacy. And Radio Haiti itself was in Haitian Creole in addition to French, so that everyone could listen, participate, and share ideas. Radio Haiti demonstrated that Creole, the language spoken by all Haitian people, could be used for serious topics and serious analysis.

Radio in Haiti began with Radio HHK, a propaganda tool of the 1915-1934 US Marine occupation. In the 1970s, churches distributed small transistor radios. These radios were locked, to prevent people from listening to things other than church stations. But the listeners managed to unlock them in order to listen to other frequencies, especially Radio Haiti Inter on 1330 am. There is a long history of resourcefulness and innovation in Haiti—a history of degaje.

The Internet still is not as democratic as radio. It is not free. Not everyone has Internet access, and not everyone can buy enough data to livestream the digital archive. Despite that, I remain certain that the Radio Haiti archive will spread. Just as people took a propaganda tool and used it for their own purposes, they’ll find a way. Just as people unlocked the church radios, they’ll find a way. We want and encourage that. We hope that people will copy the content of these flash drives and share it with others, and that those who are able to download the audio will copy it, put it on a flash drive, share it with others.

*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *

The weekend after the conferences, I left Port-au-Prince to travel to the Artibonite to visit Charles Suffrard, one of Jean Dominique’s closest friends and collaborators, a leader of KOZEPEP, an influential peasant rights organizations in Haiti. In a posthumous tribute to Dominique, which is one of the recordings featured on the flash drives, he introduces himself as “a rice farmer, and Jean Dominique’s teacher,” referring to the journalist’s uncommon respect for the expertise and experience of Haiti’s cultivators. We eat lalo and local rice from Charles’s fields. Then he takes me to the dam where they poured Jean Dominique’s ashes, after he was struck down by an assassin in Radio Haiti’s courtyard early in the morning of April 3, 2000. “This is the most important thing for you to see,” Charles says.

bridgeThe bridge from which Jean Dominique’s ashes were poured, April 2000

It feels like a pilgrimage: if I am to work on this archive, I must also know this place. The water was high and quick-moving, cloudy with sediment. “This is where all the water that irrigates the whole Artibonite Valley comes from,” Charles explained. “This is why we chose to pour Jean’s ashes here, so that he could become fertilizer for the entire Artibonite.”

ricefieldsrice fields, Artibonite
 The river glides apace toward the churning dam, and I imagine Jean Dominique’s dynamism dispersed throughout the water and earth of the Artibonite Valley, and I wonder about things that, through the act of diffusion, grow stronger. Memory should not stay stagnant or contained. Like the river, like sound, memory needs motion in order to be. As for Radio Haiti, it was never really gone. It was never lost or forgotten. It was merely, for a time, at rest. The physical archive is at Duke University now, but Duke is not really its home. The Duke project is a means of setting Radio Haiti in motion again, of creating access for as many people as possible so that Radio Haiti’s home can again be everywhere that people listen, and everywhere that they remember.
communityCommunity radio station in L’Estère, Artibonite. On the walls: “We will never forgot Jean Dominique”

Post contributed by Laura Wagner, Ph.D., Radio Haiti Project Archivist

The post Bringing Radio Haiti Home, One Step at a Time appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

CIT Open Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-06-30 17:00
Thu, Jun 30, 2016
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED.

CIT Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-06-30 17:00
Thu, Jun 30, 2016
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning.

Scholars' Tea at the Sallie Bingham Center

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-06-29 19:30
Wed, Jun 29, 2016
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Rubenstein Library Carpenter Conference Room 249
Three recipients of Mary Lily Research Grants will present brief remarks about their research projects and allow time for conversation with library staff and other attendees. Mary Lily Research Grants support researchers in their use of women's and LGBT history collection at the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture. Light refreshments will be served. Presenters: Jason Ezell, Ph.D. candidate, American Studies, University of Maryland, "Queer Shoulders: The Poetics of Radical Faerie Cultural Formation in Appalachia." Margaret Galvan, Ph.D. candidate, English, The Graduate Center, CUNY, "Burgeoning zine aesthetics in the 1980s through the censored Conference Diary from the controversial Barnard Sex Conference (1982)." Yung-Hsing Wu, associate professor, English, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, "Closely, Consciously Reading Feminism."

Lessons Tool in Sakai 11

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-06-29 15:00
Wed, Jun 29, 2016
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
To be announced
The Lessons tool allows an instructor to organize their course in a modular format to guide their students through learning tasks. It creates structured pages that pull content and functionality from other tools and organizes them as a series of sequential tasks.  This session will focus on how to use the Lessons tool including new features such as the page layout option.

CIT Open Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-06-29 14:00
Wed, Jun 29, 2016
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED.

CIT Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-06-29 14:00
Wed, Jun 29, 2016
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning.

Duke Chronicle Digital Collection (1905-1989) Is Complete!

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Wed, 2016-06-29 13:11
dukechronicle1905_600x360

Over 5,600 issues have been digitized, starting with the first one

Duke Chronicle Digital Collection (1905-1989) Is Complete!

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Wed, 2016-06-29 13:11
dukechronicle1905_600x360

Over 5,600 issues have been digitized, starting with the first one

The Lucy Monroe Calhoun Family Photographs of China

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Wed, 2016-06-29 13:10
calhoun600x360

Images of early 20th-century China offer a window into a fascinating life

The Lucy Monroe Calhoun Family Photographs of China

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Wed, 2016-06-29 13:10
calhoun600x360

Images of early 20th-century China offer a window into a fascinating life

The Chronicle Digital Collection (1905-1989) Is Complete!

Bitstreams - Tue, 2016-06-28 18:39

chronheader3The 1905 to 1939 Chronicle issues are now live online at the Duke Chronicle Digital Collection. This marks the completion of a multi-year project to digitize Duke’s student newspaper. Not only will digitization provide easier online access to this gem of a collection, but it will also help preserve the originals held in the University … Continue reading The Chronicle Digital Collection (1905-1989) Is Complete!

The post The Chronicle Digital Collection (1905-1989) Is Complete! appeared first on Bitstreams: The Digital Collections Blog.

Assessments in Sakai 11

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Tue, 2016-06-28 17:00
Tue, Jun 28, 2016
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
To be announced
Come to this workshop to learn how to use Tests & Quizzes and the Gradebook in Sakai 11.  The session will cover using the new Gradebook interface, navigating the redesigned settings area for Tests & Quizzes in addition to a new question type and delivery options for assessments.

The Asbury Park July 1970 Riots

Rubenstein Technical Services - Tue, 2016-06-28 12:55
asbury3

The John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture recently acquired the Joseph F. Mattice Papers. Mattice was a native of Asbury Park who served as a lawyer, city council member, and district court judge prior to being elected mayor of Asbury Park, New Jersey in 1969. Mattice was mayor during the Asbury Park July 1970 riots and the collection contains a bevy of material related to the riots including letters from concerned citizens, business people, news clippings, and hate speech.

asbury1One of the many examples of Hate Speech Mattice received in response of the riots, rather than trying to determine the cause of the riots and work towards a peaceful resolution, many blamed the rioters and wanted them silenced.

So how did Asbury Park become ground zero for riots from July 4th, 1970 to July 10th, 1970? This story began way before 1970. The first wave of the Great Migration brought African Americans from the South to Asbury Park for better opportunities. Historically, Asbury Park was a resort town that recruited African Americans to work in the resort industry.

asbury2Associated Press article about the history of Asbury Park

At the time of the riots, Asbury Park was a town of 17,000, 30% of which were African-American. The town’s population increased to 80,000 with summer vacationers. The Great Depression, followed by World War II, caused the resort industry in Asbury Park to change dramatically to keep up with the times.  The fancy resort stays gave way to weekend vacationers. The community maintained a steady resort community, but jobs at the resorts were frequently outsourced to white youth in the surrounding areas instead of local African American youth, which caused frustration in the community.

On the evening of Saturday July 4, 1970 all of the tension due to the lack of jobs, recreational opportunities, and decent living conditions came to a head.

  • By Monday July 6th, Mayor Mattice ordered a curfew. Surrounding local police as well as New Jersey state police were summoned and brought in via trucks by the National Guard.
  • Tuesday July 7, 1970: African American community representatives presented a list of twenty demands to city officials including better housing conditions as many were infested with rats.
  • Wednesday July 8, 1970: City officials, representatives of New Jersey Governor Cahill, and the African American community met in a closed conference. Governor Cahill completed a brief tour via vehicle then requested President Nixon to declare the city a major disaster area after the disorders (as the riots were called) were over.
  • Friday July 10, 1970: marked the last day of rioting. The state troopers were removed from the West Side but remained on patrol of other sections of the city. Mattice and city council had a productive meeting with West Side residents to discuss demands.

asbury3

 

In the end, over 180 people, including 15 state troopers were injured, and the shopping district of the west side neighborhood of Asbury Park was destroyed. Police made 167 arrests. Many West side residents were displaced from their homes, and the neighborhood was still in disarray five years after the riots. There was an estimated $4,000,000 in damage, and an additional $1,600,000 spent on cleanup costs.

The riots brought national attention to Asbury Park, New Jersey. However, Asbury Park was just one of many cities across the United States that experienced riots within the late 60s- early 70s period. The same issues: lack of job opportunities and unfit housing were prevalent for many African Americans.  The riots forced America to look at the inequalities, acknowledge them and work towards making things better.

asbury4Letter from a concerned citizen from Toledo, Ohio

The Joseph F. Mattice papers give an insider view into the riots and this period in general.   The collection is a vital research tool that allows the reader to make their own interpretation of this historical event.

Post contributed by Charmaine Bonner, SNCC Collections Intern. 

The post The Asbury Park July 1970 Riots appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Absent Laws and Missing Women [electronic resource] : Can Domestic Violence Legislation Reduce Female Mortality?

Endeca eBooks Last Week - Tue, 2016-06-28 00:00

Author: Mohammad Amin, Asif Islam.
Published: [S.l.] : [s.n.], 2016.

Currently held at: DUKE

Access to Finance and Job Growth [electronic resource] : Firm-Level Evidence across Developing Countries

Endeca eBooks Last Week - Tue, 2016-06-28 00:00

Author: Meghana Ayyagari, Pedro Juarros, Maria Soledad Martinez Peria.
Published: [S.l.] : [s.n.], 2016.

Currently held at: DUKE

Access to Pre-Primary Education and Progression in Primary School [electronic resource] : Evidence from Rural Guatemala

Endeca eBooks Last Week - Tue, 2016-06-28 00:00

Author: Bastos.
Published: [S.l.] : [s.n.], 2016.

Currently held at: DUKE

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