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Digital Repository Content Analyst (2 positions)

Jobs Combined Feed From Huginn - Mon, 2016-08-08 14:08
<div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p class="Normal1">The Digital Repository Content Analyst manages the ingest, description, access, and maintenance of materials in the Duke Digital Repository (DDR), as well as other discipline-based repositories. Working closely with the Metadata Architect, s/he handles new collection ingest requests and responds to stakeholder requests for assistance with self-deposit.</p></div></div></div>

Senior Research Data Management Consultant (2 positions)

Jobs Combined Feed From Huginn - Mon, 2016-08-08 14:03
<div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>As part of Duke University’s commitment to building a robust campus wide infrastructure for research data management, the Senior Research Data Management Consultant (RDMC) provides consulting and instruction in the policies, resources, and methods of data management.  The RDMC will partner with researchers, students, and other data management groups to develop a program that is responsive to local needs while informed by current developments data management policy and technology.</p></div></div></div>

Nobody Wants a Slow Repository

Bitstreams - Sun, 2016-08-07 22:06

turtleAs we’ve been adding features and refining the public interface to Duke’s Digital Repository, the application has become increasingly slow. Don’t worry, the very slowest versions were never deployed beyond our development servers. This blog post is about how I approached addressing the application’s performance problems before they made their way to our production site. … Continue reading Nobody Wants a Slow Repository

The post Nobody Wants a Slow Repository appeared first on Bitstreams: The Digital Collections Blog.

CIT Open Office Hours

CIT Events Test - Fri, 2016-08-05 20:55
2016-08-10T10:00:00-04:00
2016-08-10T12:00:00-04:00
Bostock 024West Campus

Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED.

Lessons Tool in Sakai 11

CIT Events Test - Fri, 2016-08-05 20:55
2016-08-24T14:00:00-04:00
2016-08-24T15:00:00-04:00
Bostock 023 Training RoomWest Campus

The Lessons tool allows an instructor to organize their course in a modular format to guide their students through learning tasks. It creates structured pages that pull content and functionality from other tools and organizes them as a series of sequential tasks.  This session will focus on how to use the Lessons tool including new features such as the page layout option.

Assessments in Sakai 11

CIT Events Test - Fri, 2016-08-05 20:55
2016-08-23T13:00:00-04:00
2016-08-23T14:00:00-04:00
Bostock 023 Training RoomWest Campus

Come to this workshop to learn how to use Tests & Quizzes and the Gradebook in Sakai 11.  The session will cover using the new Gradebook interface, navigating the redesigned settings area for Tests & Quizzes in addition to a new question type and delivery options for assessments.

Sakai 11 Quick Start

CIT Events Test - Fri, 2016-08-05 20:55
2016-08-22T14:00:00-04:00
2016-08-22T15:30:00-04:00
Bostock 023 Training RoomWest Campus

This workshop is designed to give Duke faculty and staff preparing to use Sakai the knowledge necessary to create and manage a course or project site. During the session, we will provide an overview of Sakai basics, including the most commonly used tools and how to navigage the settings of a site.

New Features in Sakai 11

CIT Events Test - Fri, 2016-08-05 20:55
2016-08-16T14:00:00-04:00
2016-08-16T15:00:00-04:00
Bostock 023 Training RoomWest Campus

This demonstration workshop will cover all new features in Sakai 11 including the new responsive user interface, the redesigned Sites area, and an overview of the new features in the Gradebook, Lessons, and Tests & Quizzes tools.

On the Paper Trail of a Former Slave: What Happened to Fanny?

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Fri, 2016-08-05 17:03
what happened to fanny 600x360

An extraordinary letter prompts a search for clues

On the Paper Trail of a Former Slave: What Happened to Fanny?

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Fri, 2016-08-05 17:03
what happened to fanny 600x360

An extraordinary letter prompts a search for clues

Duke 2020 and First-Year Library Services

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Fri, 2016-08-05 16:55
lilly library 600x360

We’ve put together a handy library guide especially for the newest class of Dukies

Duke 2020 and First-Year Library Services

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Fri, 2016-08-05 16:55
lilly library 600x360

We’ve put together a handy library guide especially for the newest class of Dukies

Quick Pic: Double Decker Drying

Preservation Underground - Fri, 2016-08-05 14:38

File under, “Why didn’t I think of that before?”

Photo Aug 05, 9 15 56 AMPro-tip: Use folding tables stacked two-high for drying wet books in a more compact footprint.

This morning I stacked two of our folding tables on top of each other to allow the tops to dry before putting them away. It occurred to me we could have created this two-tiered drying table to dry the wet books we got this week. We could dry the same number of books using half the floor space. Alternatively, we can dry twice as many books on the same footprint if we had four tables in two stacks of two. I need to remember this for next time. I think it would work as long as you were sure there was enough air flow around all the tables. Am I the last person to come up think about this?

The post Quick Pic: Double Decker Drying appeared first on Preservation Underground.

What Happened to Fanny?

Rubenstein Technical Services - Fri, 2016-08-05 13:01
1838 cropped

I wanted to share one of the most powerful letters I’ve seen while working here at the Rubenstein Library: a letter from Fanny, a former slave, writing from Texas in 1867 (99 years ago today!). Here’s the letter. (Click to enlarge; transcript below.)

fanny1 fanny2

Texana, Jackson Co., Texas, August 5th, 1867

Dear Sister,

Your kind favor of a July 3rd to hand a few days ago, it affords me such pleasure to be in a position where I can converse, if not in person through this medium. it found us all in tolerable good health and delighted to hear of [your?] being well.

I am yet so very anxious about my children that I want you to take this letter and show it to Mr Slade urgently requesting him to write to Mr J. Paul Jones (to above address.) stating all he knows in connection with the sale of my children and Mr Jones has kindly consented to write for me. He could not afford me a greater pleasure or favor and in return beg to assure him of the fervent and constant prayer of one who though humble hopes that her prayers are heard.

I hope to have a longer letter the next time for paper must be scarce in your section.

Say to Brother Slade that he is in position to require all his prayers, for he was the cause of my children being sent away, or rather my being separated, for if God can forgive him for this sin he will forgive the balance —

You forget to state anything about John Wilkins, who was your first husband. how came you to be separated or is he dead. are you a member of any church you seem so silent on that subject.

George says to send his son out here and he will go home with him next spring.

When you write to sister Lotty write the general substance of what I have written to her. I am ashamed to hear you [?] of old age. I never feel old unless after a hard day’s work. I am more like a girl of sixteen than an old woman. Receive the love of one who may never see you, but constantly has you in mind. Love from all to your family.

Your sister,

Fanny

Unfortunately we don’t have the letter’s envelope, so I don’t know who Fanny’s writing to. Although she addresses her sister, I can’t be sure they’re actual relatives. I don’t know Fanny’s last name. I don’t know her sister’s name, or where her sister lives. I’m not sure which Mr. Slade she’s referring to, or where he lived (it could be North Carolina, Georgia, or somewhere else). There’s a lot I don’t know about the people in this letter. But, one thing is very clear: Fanny’s looking for her children. The Slades sold them away, or sold her away, at some point before 1865. This letter is concrete, powerful evidence of the devastating impact slavery had on African American families, with ramifications lasting long after the the end of the Civil War.

I found this letter breathtakingly sad. I couldn’t stop thinking about Fanny. Did she ever find her children? All I could know for sure was that her sister did show the letter to Mr. Slade — because now it is held in the Slade Family Papers. But, unfortunately, I found no further correspondence with Fanny or J. Paul Jones in the collection.

I decided to look for circumstantial evidence instead. I returned to the pre-war years of the Slade Family Papers to look for evidence of her existence in the plantation records. Despite being able to trace many of the slaves owned by the Slades from the 1830s through the 1860s, Fanny was a mystery. The only hint of a slave named Fanny lies in this estate inventory for Henry Slade, who died in 1838.

1838 slave list1838: Liley (34, dropsical, 100) Fanny (15, 500) Stephen (12, 500) Atwood (10, 450) Maranda (7, 350) Clay (5, 300) Reuben (3, 200)

The majority of the papers in the collection stem from Thomas B. Slade and William Slade, two brothers who appear to have inherited the majority of Henry Slade’s estate. In 1838, Fanny was 15, and the estate inventory suggests she was unmarried and had no children. She is listed in what appears to be a family group with Liley (presumably her mother), Stephen, Atwood, Maranda, Clay, and Reuben. Fanny does not appear on William B. Slade’s slave census for 1850, and is not listed on his slave inventories for 1861 or 1864. My guess is that Henry Slade’s Fanny was separated from her mother and siblings shortly after 1838. I base this theory on an undated slave valuation scrap that I found tucked into William Slade’s account book.

Undated scrap from William Slade's account book. It lists Liley, Reuben, and Clay -- but no Fanny.Undated scrap from William Slade’s account book. It lists Liley, Reuben, and Clay — but no Fanny.

It has the same names and similar ages as the Henry Slade estate inventory, except several slaves, including Fanny, are missing. I’m guessing this scrap represents the slaves that William Slade acquired as part of the settling of Henry’s estate around 1838. It’s possible that Fanny, Stephen, Atwood, and Maranda moved with Thomas B. Slade down to Georgia, where he ran the Clinton Female Seminary. It appears that Liley, Clay, and Reuben were transferred to William Slade and stayed in Martin County, North Carolina. Clay and Reuben continue to show up on William Slade’s accounts in the 1850s.

Since that 1838 Estate List is the only evidence of any Fanny I could find in the papers, I turned back to her 1867 letter. She lived in Texana, in Jackson County, Texas, and referenced J. Paul Jones, a literate man who was writing for her. I decided to look for a Fanny from Texana in the 1870 U.S. Census, using the library’s subscription to Ancestry.com. One problem I faced was the location, Texana, which is not referenced in the 1870 Census (too small, I suppose) and is now a ghost town under the Lake Texana Reservoir. I ended up using J. Paul Jones as a reference point. By 1870, he was living in Victoria, Texas, near enough to Jackson County for me to feel confident that it was him.

Screenshot 2016-08-03 at 9.40.53 PMHe was a relatively successful landowner originally from Maryland. I then narrowed the search with a birthplace of North Carolina and a race of Black or Mulatto. And I eliminated the Fannys who were too young in 1870 to have had children before 1865.

I ended up with two possible Fannys in Texas; but, neither matched the age of the Fanny on the Henry Slade estate inventory. The first, Fanny Ward, was 26 in 1870; her estimated birth year was 1844. At the time of the census she lived with Lucas Ward (30) and George Nicholson (62) in Matagorda County, Texas, near Jackson County. The letter mentions a George, which is why this Fanny seemed like a possibility. But I’m also thinking that Fanny Ward seemed too young to be referring to herself as an old woman in her letter to her sister. The other option in Texas was Fanny Oliver, from Victoria County, Texas, also near Jackson County. In 1870, Fanny Oliver was about 58 years old, and was married to John Oliver (62). The tone of the letter reads to me like an older adult woman; between these two Fannys, I was leaning toward Fanny Oliver.

That of course presumed that Fanny still lived in Texas three years after she wrote her letter to Mr. Slade. I began to wonder if I had it wrong. Maybe by 1870, she had reconnected with her children and had returned to the East Coast. In looking around the 1870 census, I found several former Slade slaves who had taken the Slade name; I decided to see if there was a Fanny Slade living somewhere outside of Texas. It turns out yes, there were several Fanny Slades in 1870. I narrowed my census search to slaves born in North Carolina in or around 1820, and found the following:

Screenshot 2016-08-03 at 9.32.56 PMSlade, Fanny. 45. F. Black. Works on Farm. Birthplace: NC. Cannot Read. Cannot Write.

And with her: Slade, Rose. 15. F. Black. Works on Farm. Birthplace: GA. Cannot Read. Cannot Write.

Circumstantial evidence suggests this is the right Fanny. She adopted the Slade last name. In 1870 she was 45, meaning that in 1867 she was 42 — she was old enough to have children pre-war. She would have been born around 1825, only 2 years off from the 1838 estate valuation from the Slade Family Papers, which put Fanny’s birth year as 1823. In 1870, Fanny Slade was living in Dooly County, Georgia, which was home to numerous other Slades, both black and white, in the 1870 Census. And most gratifying, in my mind, was to see that in 1870 she was living with Rose, a daughter, which suggests that her quest to be reunited with her children was partially successful.

It could be that I’m totally wrong; the Slade Family Papers are frustratingly silent and I’m out of ideas as to how to cross-reference this hypothesis. Too many blanks in the evidence means I have too many unanswered questions, the first being, What Happened to Fanny’s Other Children? I doubt we’ll ever know.

Letters from former slaves to their masters, like Fanny’s, are extraordinary documentary evidence of freedmen and women claiming their freedom and their rights. What’s amazing to me is that this letter was not only written, but has survived. So many former slaves did not have Fanny’s resources, especially friends like J. Paul Jones, to help her find her children. I hope that she at least found some answers, even if I never do.

The post What Happened to Fanny? appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

A review of rolling-type seismic isolation: Historical development and future directions

Scopus Query (for science portal) - Fri, 2016-08-05 04:23
Author(s):Harvey, P.S. | Kelly, K.C.<br>Publication year: 2016<br>Journal / Book title: Engineering Structures<br><br>Access <a href="http://www.scopus.com/results/results.url?sort=plf-f&src=s&nlo=1&nlr=20&nls=&affilName=duke&sid=50C4CC75DD91BE54EF957326B03AC936.WeLimyRvBMk2ky9SFKc8Q%3a330&sot=afnl&sdt=cl&cluster=scopubyr%2c%222016%22%2ct%2c%222015%22%2ct%2bscosubtype%2c%22ar%22%2ct%2c%22ip%22%2ct%2c%22re%22%2ct%2c%22ch%22%2ct%2bscosubjabbr%2c%22ARTS%22%2cf%2c%22ECON%22%2cf%2c%22BUSI%22%2cf&sl=207&s=%28AF-ID%28%22Duke+University%22+60008724%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22P.M.+Gross+Chemical+Laboratory%22+60019814%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+University+Marine+Laboratory%22+60020096%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+Institute+for+Genome+Sciences+%26+Policy%22+60076653%29%29&origin=rssreader">all results</a> for your search in Scopus<br>

Nonparametric Bayesian topic modelling with the hierarchical Pitman–Yor processes

Scopus Query (for science portal) - Fri, 2016-08-05 04:23
Author(s):Lim, K.W. | Buntine, W. | Chen, C. | Du, L.<br>Publication year: 2016<br>Journal / Book title: International Journal of Approximate Reasoning<br><br>Access <a href="http://www.scopus.com/results/results.url?sort=plf-f&src=s&nlo=1&nlr=20&nls=&affilName=duke&sid=50C4CC75DD91BE54EF957326B03AC936.WeLimyRvBMk2ky9SFKc8Q%3a330&sot=afnl&sdt=cl&cluster=scopubyr%2c%222016%22%2ct%2c%222015%22%2ct%2bscosubtype%2c%22ar%22%2ct%2c%22ip%22%2ct%2c%22re%22%2ct%2c%22ch%22%2ct%2bscosubjabbr%2c%22ARTS%22%2cf%2c%22ECON%22%2cf%2c%22BUSI%22%2cf&sl=207&s=%28AF-ID%28%22Duke+University%22+60008724%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22P.M.+Gross+Chemical+Laboratory%22+60019814%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+University+Marine+Laboratory%22+60020096%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+Institute+for+Genome+Sciences+%26+Policy%22+60076653%29%29&origin=rssreader">all results</a> for your search in Scopus<br>

CIT Open Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-08-04 17:00
Thu, Aug 4, 2016
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED.

When Monday Turns Meta

Preservation Underground - Wed, 2016-08-03 18:29

mondays be like

We got a lot of rain in the wee hours of Monday morning. Housekeeping alerted the library, and our Preservation Officer and Head of Security sprang into action. The rain found its way from the roof down three levels to the sub basement. Most of the damage was to ceiling tiles, carpeting and equipment.

It could have been worse. Less than 100 collection items got wet. We set up drying stations in the lab and in the fume hood-room and quickly got to work. At one point we ran out of fans and put out a request to our colleagues. Within minutes we had more than enough to get the job done. We had to take only one book to the freezer.

Photo Aug 01, 10 31 53 AMRachel setting up drying stations in the fume-hood room.

Unfortunately the water found its way inside the walls of the Digital Production Center, Conservation and our disaster supply closet (oh the irony). Our vendor had to pull the baseboards out and cut holes in the wall to allow air to get inside to dry the drywall.

Photo Aug 01, 10 37 12 AMDisaster supply closet Photo Aug 01, 10 31 11 AMConservation Lab

We had more rain Tuesday night with additional moisture seeping through the walls. Looks like we will be working undercover for a while until they track down the problem. We’ve had some good practice at this sort of thing, so we know how to be productive even though the lab is a mess.

Photo Aug 01, 10 37 12 AMDisaster in the disaster supply closet. Outside our front door.Outside our front door, before pulling up the carpet.

We are hoping for drier weather in the days to come, but July and August are our rainy seasons so anything can happen. Until then, we will do what we can and stay vigilant for more leaks.

*I realize this video has been said to be staged, but it is still pretty accurate to how we felt on Monday morning.

The post When Monday Turns Meta appeared first on Preservation Underground.

CIT Open Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-08-03 14:00
Wed, Aug 3, 2016
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED.

Re-imagining nature : the promise of a Christian natural theology

Endeca eBooks Last Week - Wed, 2016-08-03 00:00

Author: McGrath, Alister E., 1953- author.
Published: Chichester, West Sussex : John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2017.

Currently held at: DUKE

Pages

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