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Maternal temperature effects on dormancy influence germination responses to water availability in Arabidopsis thaliana

Scopus Query (for science portal) - Fri, 2016-03-11 16:46
Author(s):Edwards, B.R. | Burghardt, L.T. | Zapata-Garcia, M. | Donohue, K.<br>Publication year: 2016<br>Journal / Book title: Environmental and Experimental Botany<br><br>Access <a href="http://www.scopus.com/results/results.url?sort=plf-f&src=s&nlo=1&nlr=20&nls=&affilName=duke&sid=50C4CC75DD91BE54EF957326B03AC936.WeLimyRvBMk2ky9SFKc8Q%3a330&sot=afnl&sdt=cl&cluster=scopubyr%2c%222016%22%2ct%2c%222015%22%2ct%2bscosubtype%2c%22ar%22%2ct%2c%22ip%22%2ct%2c%22re%22%2ct%2c%22ch%22%2ct%2bscosubjabbr%2c%22ARTS%22%2cf%2c%22ECON%22%2cf%2c%22BUSI%22%2cf&sl=207&s=%28AF-ID%28%22Duke+University%22+60008724%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22P.M.+Gross+Chemical+Laboratory%22+60019814%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+University+Marine+Laboratory%22+60020096%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+Institute+for+Genome+Sciences+%26+Policy%22+60076653%29%29&origin=rssreader">all results</a> for your search in Scopus<br>

Say Hello to Eddie Cameron

Preservation Underground - Thu, 2016-03-10 22:13

Eddie Cameron is a very well known figure around campus. His forty-six year career with the athletics program is the second longest tenure in Duke’s history and our indoor stadium was renamed for him in 1972.

The Edmund M. Cameron Records in the University Archives consists of nearly 14 linear feet of materials produced during his career, and includes three large scrapbooks. Those scrapbooks were adopted for conservation treatment recently through our Adopt-a-Book Program and, over the course of treating one of them, I was able to (quite literally) see Cameron in a whole new way.

Two of the scrapbooks in the collection focus on particular bowl games, but the third is a more general collection of photographs and newspaper clippings from Cameron’s time at Duke. The scrapbook is no longer bound and is currently stored as loose sheets in an over-sized records box.

Cameron Scrapbook

During my initial examination, I came across a large folded sheet at the bottom of the stack, which I could pretty quickly tell was a large drawing executed with a few different colors of marker.

Before TreatmentBefore Treatment

The thick, machine-made paper had been folded in half three times so that it could fit inside the scrapbook. Two of the edges of the sheet had been rough-cut with scissors, leading me to believe that the paper came off of a large roll. Short pieces of masking  tape had been applied along the outer edges of the sheet, presumably to mount it on a wall.  There were also stains along the folds and some significant scarf tears. In consultation with the University Archivist, the decision was made to unfold and repair this drawing. We decided not to pursue stain reduction as a part of this treatment, but it could be an option for the future.

The adhesive of the masking  tape had become desiccated and powdery, so I was able to simply remove the carrier layer of the tape and gently brush adhesive from the paper surface. The front and back of the poster were then dry-cleaned with white vinyl eraser crumbs to remove any surface dirt or grime. Since the paper was quite thick and had not become brittle, I was able to unfold the sheet during cleaning, but it remained heavily creased and undulated. After testing all of the inks for solubility, the folded poster was placed in a humidity chamber for a couple of hours and then moved to a large felt stack to press for several weeks. When fully flattened, the tears were mended with toned Japanese paper and wheat starch paste.

After TreatmentAfter Treatment

The drawing is not signed and we may never know the name of the artist, but I really like it. I think that it captures Cameron’s likeness pretty  successfully. The unfolded poster is quite large (39″ x 30″), so it was placed in a Bristol board folder and will now live safely in flat file storage.

I am wrapping up treatment on the three Cameron scrapbooks now. With some repairs and new enclosures, they are now much easier to handle and have already been getting some use. On March 1, the New Era Pinstripe Bowl trophy was on display in Perkins Library, along with other historical Duke football memorabilia from the University Archives. Cameron’s scrapbook about the 1945 Sugar Bowl was one of the items on display.

University Archivist Valerie Gillispie with Coach Cutcliffe and President BrodheadUniversity Archivist Valerie Gillispie with Coach Cutcliffe and President Brodhead

The post Say Hello to Eddie Cameron appeared first on Preservation Underground.

The Attics of Your Life

Bitstreams - Thu, 2016-03-10 20:22

Bart_starr_bwIf you happen to be rummaging through your parents’ or grandparents’ attic, basement or garage, and stumble upon some old reel-to-reel audiotape, or perhaps some dust-covered videotape reels that seem absurdly large & clunky, they are most likely worthless, except for perhaps sentimental value. Even if these artifacts did, at one time, have some unique historic content, you may … Continue reading The Attics of Your Life

The post The Attics of Your Life appeared first on Bitstreams: The Digital Collections Blog.

DVS Workshop: Web Scraping - gathering data from websites, HTML &amp; JSON Parsing, APIs and gathering Twitter streams

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-03-10 18:30
Thu, Mar 10, 2016
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Bostock Library Room 023 (Library Classroom)
This hands-on workshop will enable participants to

DVS Workshop: Web Scraping and Gathering Data from Websites

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-03-10 18:30
Thu, Mar 10, 2016
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Bostock Library Room 023 (Library Classroom)
This hands-on workshop will enable participants to

CIT Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-03-10 18:00
Thu, Mar 10, 2016
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning.

Innovation in the pharmaceutical industry: New estimates of R&amp;D costs

Scopus Query (for science portal) - Thu, 2016-03-10 16:34
Author(s):DiMasi, J.A. | Grabowski, H.G. | Hansen, R.W.<br>Publication year: 2016<br>Journal / Book title: Journal of Health Economics<br><br>Access <a href="http://www.scopus.com/results/results.url?sort=plf-f&src=s&nlo=1&nlr=20&nls=&affilName=duke&sid=50C4CC75DD91BE54EF957326B03AC936.WeLimyRvBMk2ky9SFKc8Q%3a330&sot=afnl&sdt=cl&cluster=scopubyr%2c%222016%22%2ct%2c%222015%22%2ct%2bscosubtype%2c%22ar%22%2ct%2c%22ip%22%2ct%2c%22re%22%2ct%2c%22ch%22%2ct%2bscosubjabbr%2c%22ARTS%22%2cf%2c%22ECON%22%2cf%2c%22BUSI%22%2cf&sl=207&s=%28AF-ID%28%22Duke+University%22+60008724%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22P.M.+Gross+Chemical+Laboratory%22+60019814%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+University+Marine+Laboratory%22+60020096%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+Institute+for+Genome+Sciences+%26+Policy%22+60076653%29%29&origin=rssreader">all results</a> for your search in Scopus<br>

Our Stories, Your Legacy: A Dialogue with SNCC Veterans

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-03-09 23:30
Wed, Mar 09, 2016
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Smith Warehouse - Bay 4, C105 -- Amadieh Family Lecture Hall (Garage)The Garage
Please join the SNCC Digital Gateway Project and Duke Libraries for a conversation with three veterans of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as they discuss their work as activists and reflect on how telling the story of the Movement has evolved over time. Charlie Cobb (journalist), Judy Richardson (filmmaker), and Maria Varela (photographer) will highlight how SNCC taught them the importance of capturing experiences in the moment. The panel will also discuss their current efforts towards story-telling SNCC's history using archival material and comment on ways that modern activists can document their own work.

[Cancelled] Finding Funding Workshop

Edge Events - Wed, 2016-03-09 20:00
Wed, Mar 9, 2016: 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Edge: Workshop Room

Looking for funding? Seeking a fellowship to support research? Want to fund travel for a summer project? Need dissertation support? Take this opportunity to learn how to search for funding by using Duke's subscription to COS* Pivot.  In class you'll create an account, update your profile and plan a search  strategy leading to a short-list of likely funders.  Class size is limited, so register earlyhttps://duke.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_2agpJttm42YLrJb

 

**Please be sure to bring your own laptop.

The Edge Worshop Room is located in 127 Bostock.

 


Finding Funding Workshop

Edge + Digital Scholarship Events - Wed, 2016-03-09 20:00
Wed, Mar 9, 2016
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Edge: Workshop Room
Looking for funding? Seeking a fellowship to support research? Want to fund travel for a summer project? Need dissertation support? Take this opportunity to learn how to search for funding by using Duke's subscription to COS* Pivot.  In class you'll create an account, update your profile and plan a search  strategy leading to a short-list of likely funders.  Class size is limited, so register earlyhttps://duke.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_2agpJttm42YLrJb

Finding Funding Workshop

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-03-09 20:00
Wed, Mar 9, 2016
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Edge: Workshop Room
Looking for funding? Seeking a fellowship to support research? Want to fund travel for a summer project? Need dissertation support? Take this opportunity to learn how to search for funding by using Duke's subscription to COS* Pivot.  In class you'll create an account, update your profile and plan a search  strategy leading to a short-list of likely funders.  Class size is limited, so register earlyhttps://duke.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_2agpJttm42YLrJb

OIT's Learn IT @ Lunch: Identity theft: Reduce your risk, protect yourself

Edge Events - Wed, 2016-03-09 17:00
Wed, Mar 9, 2016: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Edge: Workshop Room

Presenter: John Straffin - IT Security Office

Have you received a notice that your personal information was exposed in a data breach? More than 12 million Americans were victims of $16 billion worth of fraud in 2014, including some in the Duke community. Learn what you can do to keep your personal information secure — and steps to take if your identity is stolen.

NOTE: This is a repeat of the session offered during the Fall 2015 semester.


OIT's Learn IT @ Lunch: Identity theft: Reduce your risk, protect yourself

Edge + Digital Scholarship Events - Wed, 2016-03-09 17:00
Wed, Mar 9, 2016
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Edge: Workshop Room

OIT's Learn IT @ Lunch: Identity theft: Reduce your risk, protect yourself

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-03-09 17:00
Wed, Mar 9, 2016
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Edge: Workshop Room

“The Poetic Inflections of a Voice Addressing a Tribe of Men Besieged by Beasts”: Radio Haiti’s Cultural Programming

Rubenstein Technical Services - Wed, 2016-03-09 16:18
Franketienne1

On December 29, 1972, the renowned writer, poet, and visual artist Frankétienne, one of the fathers of the Spiralist literary movement, wrote a letter to his friend, Jean Dominique.

My very dear Jean, how the years have passed, since that afternoon when I first saw you at Thony Phelps’ house!  That was in 1962, I believe.  You smoked a pipe at the time.  That day, there was talk of a book upon which you would be commenting the next day on the air at Radio Haïti.  Ah!  How the years have passed! 

Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 1 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 2 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 3 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 4 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 5 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 6 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 7 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 8 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 9 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 10 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 11 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 12 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 13 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 14 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 15 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 16 Frankétienne’s letter to Jean Dominique page 17

For Frankétienne, Jean Dominique was both a personal friend and an intellectual interlocutor; the cultural programming he oversaw at Radio Haiti not only showcased Haitian arts and literature, but also influenced them.

Meanwhile, you continue, with ferocity and great faith, in your work as a lucid informant, guiding your listeners, aiding the youth with your advice.  And as for me, I was among that number who listened to you, who followed you closely.  Your critical analyses were for me an invaluable contribution, as much on the human level as on the purely human level. Your Sunday broadcasts enhanced my love of art, cinema and in particular literature, even influencing my reading and literary research.  And, today, now that we have become friends, this remains true.  Jean, my brother, you could not suspect or guess how my conversations with you have oriented and enriched my work as a writer.  Your insights have been of great use to me, with regard to the material of my last book Ultravocal

 The letter is from 1972, shortly after Jean Dominique bought Radio Haiti; it offers a glimmer of what was to come. In the years that followed, Radio Haiti’s main cultural program “Entre Nous” would become something of an on-air salon, a place where painters, poets, novelists, historians, social scientists, storytellers, playwrights, musicians, critics, and others came together to discuss their work.  Émile Ollivier, Mimi Barthélemy, Edwidge Danticat, Amos Coulanges, Tiga, Georges Castera, Syto Cavé, Roger Gaillard, Jean Fouchard, Kettly Mars, Dany Laferrière, Gary Victor, Yanick Lahens, Ralph Allen, Jean René Jérôme…

To listen to these creators of art and of knowledge is to reorient the narrative about Haiti.  The standard story of Haiti is dominated by crisis: rare is the mainstream US news article that does not contain the words “the poorest country in the Western hemisphere.”  Haitian people are depicted as either powerless victims or bloodthirsty criminals.  For centuries, lurid, racist, deterministic narratives have enabled dominant geopolitical powers to undermine Haitian sovereignty and justify exploitation. According to these tropes, Haiti and Haitian people are organically poor – not only materially and economically, but intellectually, culturally and morally as well.  Haiti is atavistic, violent and diseased. Haiti is starving children, “boat people,” ragged people.  Haitian suffering is described, exaggerated, and luxuriated over, but rarely presented as anything other than an inevitability.

Radio Haiti presented Haitian narratives about Haitian crisis, exposing and analyzing the structural causes of oppression and political instability.  The archive contains the voices of the intellectual elite and of the urban and rural poor alike, for Radio Haiti was one of the few places at the time where the oppressed and disenfranchised masses had lapawòl, the power of speech.

And in its cultural programming, Radio Haiti achieved even more: it decentered the narrative of crisis.  It presented not a Haiti of suffering, but a Haiti of beauty and brilliance, one in which crisis is met with and defied by acts of creation.  A Haiti in which art, both implicitly and explicitly, is political.

A few months ago, I found a little piece of ephemera hidden face-down at the bottom of a reel-to-reel tape box.  It had been used as scratch paper: on one side is a handwritten list of sponsors from the late 1980s (Parkay Margarine, Kraft Mayonnaise, Breacol cough syrup, and so on).  On the other side is this:

raffle ticketRaffle ticket, December 1979

By 1979-1980, businesses no longer advertised on Radio Haiti. The station openly opposed the Duvalier dictatorship, and potential sponsors, afraid of reprisal, did not want to be seen as accomplices.  During this time, station manager Richard Brisson famously raised some money by using his car as a taxi. And in December 1979, several celebrated Haitian painters donated their works for an art raffle in support of Radio Haiti.   Each ticket cost three dollars, for the chance to win a piece by one of these twelve renowned artists.  The ticket is a relic, a souvenir of the extraordinary devotion that Radio Haiti inspired.  It is also a poignant reminder of the grinding struggle to keep the station afloat day-to-day in the face of economic obstacles and political oppression.

Sometimes it feels as though Radio Haiti’s story, like that of Haiti itself, is eclipsed by crisis — that Jean Dominique’s assassination has become the principal lens through which we understand and remember Radio Haiti.  But the loss of Jean Dominique and the injustice of his murder matter because his life mattered, because Radio Haiti’s many decades of work and legacy matter.  Before the symbolic weight of memory, before the burden of hindsight, before the doomed prophet, there was the daily work of the station — all of which lives on in this archive.

So much comes before death; so much remains when death is no more.

In his letter to Jean Dominique, Frankétienne outlines the challenges facing the Haitian writer who strives to be accessible.

All writers, at least as far as I’m concerned, would like to be read and understood by their people, by the greatest number of people possible.  It is our dearest hope.  Yet, if that does not occur immediately, then another story, often macabre, begins.  In the case of our country, one must overcome a double illiteracy: 1) obvious illiteracy (the inability to read at all, whether in Creole or in French) and 2) hidden illiteracy (the belief that one knows how to read, but in truth one does not perceive the structure and the possible meanings of a text).  Faced with this double difficulty, or rather facing this double obstacle, the Haitian writer has no choice.  It is absolutely impossible for him to write for the masses that cannot read at all.  And this makes him suffer terribly, especially when, in his books, he reckons with problems that would be of utmost interest to those illiterate masses

Radio was a medium of unparalleled power in twentieth-century Haiti: it enabled people to participate in public discourse, as both listeners and speakers, whether or not they could read and write.  And it allowed writers to reach a far broader audience, to be true public intellectuals.  For this is what Jean Dominique was: a public intellectual. It was on the radio that his intellect unfurled: analytical and incisive, sometimes staggering.

There is a poet character who wanders, searching through words in a verbal delirium, writes Frankétienne in his letter, describing the themes of Ultravocal. 

In the course of his phantasmal voyage, overcome by pain, he discovers that his drama is not entirely personal, that his own rupture is nothing more than one aspect of a far wider tragedy, the great human misery.  From that moment on, the text breaks apart, spreading from the individual to the collective, from the subjective to the objective, from the particular to the general…  And the poet character, entwined with the narrator, dizzy, speaks. The poetic inflections of a voice addressing a tribe of men besieged by beasts.  My voice, perhaps.  Yours, or that of either of us.  And, when the narrator suggests… that one day, evil will be struck down into the dust with a terrible noise, then begins the final song, that of hope.

A week to the day before Frankétienne wrote his letter, Jean Dominique interviewed the painter Rose-Marie Desruisseau, in which she describes participating in ceremonies as part of her research for a series of paintings on Vodou.  (It was revolutionary, at that time, to speak on the radio of Vodou as a topic of intellectual and cultural importance and as everyday practice: Duvalier père had politicized and exerted control over Vodou, manipulating its imagery for his own purposes and power while exercising sanctions on the practice.)  Desruisseau describes her interactions with the Gede spirits, who are intermediaries between life and death. They dance provocatively through the cemetery, and shout and sing obscenities.  They are lively gods of death.  Vulgarity and humor, which transcend respectability and social convention, are the very things that enable Gede to straddle life and the afterlife, to be the master of the crossroads.

Rose-Marie Desruisseau explains:

“J’ai commencé d’abord par les dieux de la mort, tu vois, et puis je n’ai pas trouvé la mort chez eux, j’ai trouvé la vie intense, chez eux… chez les Guédés. Je n’ai pas trouvé la mort du tout.”

“I began first with the gods of death, you see, and it was not death that I found there.  I found intense life there… among the Gede spirits.  I did not find death at all.”

Radio Haiti’s archive, like a cemetery, like Haiti itself, is a place that could be defined by tragedy, loss and death.  The archive, like Haiti’s history, is filled with human rights violations, massacres, impunity, and assassinations.

Yet, listening to artists and iconoclasts, creators and truth-tellers, I recall those same words: It was not death that I found here, in Radio Haiti’s archive.  I found intense life here; I did not find death at all.

Post contributed by Laura Wagner, Ph.D., Radio Haiti Project Archivist. 

The post “The Poetic Inflections of a Voice Addressing a Tribe of Men Besieged by Beasts”: Radio Haiti’s Cultural Programming appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

CIT Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-03-09 15:00
Wed, Mar 9, 2016
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning.

Low-Maintenance Book Club Discussion: Neil Gaiman's "Trigger Warning"

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Tue, 2016-03-08 22:30
Tue, Mar 08, 2016
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM
None
Miss reading for fun? Consider joining the Duke University Libraries for our first "Low Maintenance Book Club" on March 8! This book club aims to provide space for members of the Duke community to connect over reading. Realizing how busy people are (and how much reading you probably have to do for classwork and research), we will focus on quick reads. We will read texts like short stories, graphic novels, interesting short essays, poetry, etc. For our first meeting we will be discussing several stories from Neil Gaiman's "Trigger Warning," which Bookreporter.com says has "something for every type of Gaiman fan here, and those new to his work will find this to be a solid introduction to the type of stories he crafts: lyrical, literary, sometimes quite chilling, and always strange and provocative...This is a book to savor and enjoy." Light refreshments will be served! Please click on "More Info" and register to attend.

ScholComm Discussion Series

Edge + Digital Scholarship Events - Tue, 2016-03-08 20:00
Tue, Mar 8, 2016
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Edge: Workshop Room
   The Office of Copyright and Scholarly Communication invites the Duke Libraries staff to join us in a monthly discussion of current issues and topics in scholarly publishing, copyright and licensing, open access, and the visibility of Duke research and teaching on a global scale. Each session will feature a different topic and is open to all interested Library staff members. Refreshments will be provided.

ScholComm Discussion Series

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Tue, 2016-03-08 20:00
Tue, Mar 8, 2016
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Edge: Workshop Room
   The Office of Copyright and Scholarly Communication invites the Duke Libraries staff to join us in a monthly discussion of current issues and topics in scholarly publishing, copyright and licensing, open access, and the visibility of Duke research and teaching on a global scale. Each session will feature a different topic and is open to all interested Library staff members. Refreshments will be provided.

SSRI~ Workshop: Introduction to Survey Experiments

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Tue, 2016-03-08 17:00
Tue, Mar 08, 2016
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
This workshop provides an introduction to conducting survey experiments, including a brief motivation for when and why to use an experiment. The workshop covers common experimental designs, how to design and pretest experimental manipulations, and concludes with a discussion of how to analyze experimental data. The workshop will conclude at 1:30, with a half-hour allotted after that time for Q&A. Registration required; please click "More Information" below to access the registration form.

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