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Advanced Tableau - Data Structures (DVS Workshop Series)

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-10-05 17:30
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

This workshop will focus on the challenges of using different types and structures of data in Tableau.  We will learn how to clean and organize various data sources for Tableau, how to join and blend data to combine datasets, and how to design visualizations when datasets have been joined or blended.

 

Questions about this workshop?  Email askdata@duke.edu

DVS Workshop: Advanced Tableau - Data Structures

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-10-05 17:30
Wed, Oct 05, 2016
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Bostock Library 023(Library Classroom)
This workshop will focus on the challenges of using different types and structures of data in Tableau. We will learn how to clean and organize various data sources for Tableau, how to join and blend data to combine datasets, and how to design visualizations when datasets have been joined or blended.

CIT Open Office Hours

CIT Events Test - Wed, 2016-10-05 14:00
Bostock 024
West Campus

Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED.

DVS Workshop: Intro to R: Data Transformations, Analysis, and Data Structures

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Tue, 2016-10-04 18:00
Tue, Oct 04, 2016
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Bostock Library - The Edge Workshop RoomFirst Floor
A gentle introduction to the basics of the R statistical programming language using the RStudio development environment. Learn about managing your R projects, loading data into R (readr), cleaning data (dplyr), and basic descriptive statistics. No previous experience required. Please note: Laptops required for this course. The instructors will email attendees before the workshop with more details about course materials.

Intro to R: Data Transformations, Analysis, and Data Structures (DVS Workshop Series)

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Tue, 2016-10-04 18:00
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

A gentle introduction to the basics of the R statistical programming language using the RStudio development environment.  Learn about managing your R projects, loading data into R (readr), cleaning data (dplyr), and basic descriptive statistics. No previous experience required.

 

Please note: Laptops required for this course.  The instructors will email attendees before the workshop with more details about course materials.

Intro to R: Data Transformations, Analysis, and Data Structures (DVS Workshop Series)

Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

A gentle introduction to the basics of the R statistical programming language using the RStudio development environment.  Learn about managing your R projects, loading data into R (readr), cleaning data (dplyr), and basic descriptive statistics. No previous experience required.

 

Please note: Laptops required for this course.  The instructors will email attendees before the workshop with more details about course materials.

East Campus Open Office Hours

CIT Events Test - Tue, 2016-10-04 18:00
Lilly Library Computer Lab
East Campus

Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED.

Screen/Society--Reel Women Directors of the Middle-East [Lebanon]--"Where Do We Go Now?"

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Tue, 2016-10-04 00:00
Mon, Oct 03, 2016
8:00 PM - 10:00 PM
White 107 (White Lecture Hall)
Film Screening: "Where Do We Go Now?" (Nadine Labaki, 2012, 100 min, France, Lebanon, Egypt, Italy, in Arabic, Russian, English w/ English subtitles, Color, Blu-Ray) / Set in a remote village where the church and the mosque stand side by side, "Where Do We Go Now?" follows the antics of the town's women to keep their blowhard men from starting a religious war. Women heartsick over sons, husbands and fathers lost to previous flare-ups unite to distract their men with clever ruses, from faking a miracle to hiring a troop of Ukrainian strippers./ -- Critics' Choice Movie Award Nominee for Best Foreign Language Film! / -- Winner of People's Choice Award at Toronto International Film Festival! / "This spirited troupe of women ... makes us citizens of the village, invested in their joys and fears. We grieve with them, under that burning sun, and hope with them for a lasting peace." -- Moira MacDonald, Seattle Times / Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Te9c2jReOg

A Revolution in Evolution: Open Science Projects at Duke

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Mon, 2016-10-03 16:00
Mon, Oct 03, 2016
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Old Chemistry 011
The scientific practice of sharing information, begun in earnest with the creation of society journals, entered a new epoch with the digital age. Through online open science projects, Duke researchers Karen Cranston and Doug Boyer are extending the potential for sharing data and expanding our knowledge of evolution, from microbes to mammals. Join us as they talk with Duke librarian Elena Feinstein about the motivations behind open science, how their projects (MorphoSource and Open Tree of Life) embody and benefit from openness, and the professional rewards (and challenges) of pursuing open science. This talk is made possible by the Forum for Scholars and Publics, Duke University Libraries' Digital Scholarship Services department, and The Edge: The Ruppert Commons for Research, Technology, and Collaboration, which is hosting a series of events at Duke in 2016-2017 on the theme of Open. With presentations, workshops, and project teams focused on open access, data, publishing, research, scholarship, science, and software, the Libraries offer an opportunity for the Duke community to discuss, learn, reflect, and engage in a changing scholarly landscape that promises to expand the traditional boundaries of academia.

A Revolution in Evolution: Open Science Projects at Duke (The Edge Open Series)

Other (see event description)
West Campus

The scientific practice of sharing information, begun in earnest with the creation of society journals, entered a new epoch with the digital age. Through online open science projects, Duke researchers Karen Cranston and Doug Boyer are extending the potential for sharing data and expanding our knowledge of evolution, from microbes to mammals. Join us as they talk with Duke librarian Elena Feinstein about the motivations behind open science, how their projects (MorphoSource and Open Tree of Life) embody and benefit from openness, and the professional rewards (and challenges) of pursuing open science. Hosted at the Forum for Scholars and Publics (Old Chem 011, West Campus).

This talk is made possible by the Forum for Scholars and Publics, Duke University Libraries' Digital Scholarship Services department, and The Edge: The Ruppert Commons for Research, Technology, and Collaboration, which is hosting a series of events at Duke in 2016-2017 on the theme of Open. With presentations, workshops, and project teams focused on open access, data, publishing, research, scholarship, science, and software, the Libraries offer an opportunity for the Duke community to discuss, learn, reflect, and engage in a changing scholarly landscape that promises to expand the traditional boundaries of academia.

A Revolution in Evolution: Open Science Projects at Duke (The Edge Open Series)

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Mon, 2016-10-03 16:00
Other (see event description)
West Campus

The scientific practice of sharing information, begun in earnest with the creation of society journals, entered a new epoch with the digital age. Through online open science projects, Duke researchers Karen Cranston and Doug Boyer are extending the potential for sharing data and expanding our knowledge of evolution, from microbes to mammals. Join us as they talk with Duke librarian Elena Feinstein about the motivations behind open science, how their projects (MorphoSource and Open Tree of Life) embody and benefit from openness, and the professional rewards (and challenges) of pursuing open science. Hosted at the Forum for Scholars and Publics (Old Chem 011, West Campus).

This talk is made possible by the Forum for Scholars and Publics, Duke University Libraries' Digital Scholarship Services department, and The Edge: The Ruppert Commons for Research, Technology, and Collaboration, which is hosting a series of events at Duke in 2016-2017 on the theme of Open. With presentations, workshops, and project teams focused on open access, data, publishing, research, scholarship, science, and software, the Libraries offer an opportunity for the Duke community to discuss, learn, reflect, and engage in a changing scholarly landscape that promises to expand the traditional boundaries of academia.

VFF: Lies, Damn Lies & Statistics - What Deceptive Data Stories Teach Us About Information Visualization

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2016-09-30 16:00
Fri, Sep 30, 2016
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
LSRC D106
Description TBD; see More Information for the most up-to-date information.

VFF: Visualization Friday Forum

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2016-09-30 16:00
Fri, Sep 30, 2016
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum is an informal meeting for faculty, staff and students from across the university to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Each week, a speaker is invited to prepare a 35-minute informal presentation for a 50-minute time slot. The presentation is centered on a scientific problem or visualization technique. Participants in the audience are encouraged to engage in a discussion with the speaker. The goal of the weekly meetings is to build an interdisciplinary community whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. For weekly updates about the Visualization Friday Forum, please visit our website (http://vis.duke.edu/FridayForum) or subscribe to our listserv (https://lists.duke.edu/sympa/subscribe/visualization)

Introduction to QGIS (DVS Workshop Series)

Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Looking for an open source desktop application for Geographic Information System (GIS)?  QGIS Desktop is one alternative to using other mapping applications that can be costly and QGIS runs of multiple platforms including Windows, Mac, Unix, and Linux.  In this introductory workshop we will discuss the benefits of using QGIS, introduce basic mapping concepts, and demonstrate how to import and analyze data in QGIS.

Questions about this workshop?  Email askdata@duke.edu

DVS Workshop: Introduction to QGIS

Thu, Sep 29, 2016
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Bostock Library 023(Library Classroom)
Looking for an open source desktop application for Geographic Information System (GIS)? QGIS Desktop is one alternative to using other mapping applications that can be costly and QGIS runs of multiple platforms including Windows, Mac, Unix, and Linux. In this introductory workshop we will discuss the benefits of using QGIS, introduce basic mapping concepts, and demonstrate how to import and analyze data in QGIS.

CIT Open Office Hours

CIT Events Test - 0 sec ago
Bostock 024
West Campus

Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED.

Improve your course with mid-semester feedback

Bostock 024
West Campus
Students can help you improve your teaching. In this workshop, we will consider several different ways of gathering actionable feedback from students at mid-semester using surveys, Small Group Instructional Feedback and focus groups. Participants will be able to select a method for gathering student opinions and will learn how to most effectively use this feedback to improve their course.
 

Improve your course with mid-semester feedback

CIT Events Test - 0 sec ago
Bostock 024
West Campus
Students can help you improve your teaching. In this workshop, we will consider several different ways of gathering actionable feedback from students at mid-semester using surveys, Small Group Instructional Feedback and focus groups. Participants will be able to select a method for gathering student opinions and will learn how to most effectively use this feedback to improve their course.
 

Making Data Visual (DVS Workshop Series)

Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

The process of making data visual can be nuanced and iterative.  Sometimes we start a project with a very specific idea of the kind of visualization we want, but other times we may not be sure what will work best.  This workshop will address three important aspects of making data visual: identifying the goal of your visualization, identifying the audience of your visualization, and understanding the pros and cons of different types of visualizations.  This workshop will focus not on any specific software application, but instead will focus on helping attendees develop instincts for what kinds of visualizations match well with particular datasets, goals, and audiences. The emphasis for this workshop will be on standard visualization types, like bar charts and scatter plots, rather than non-traditional visualizations or graphics.

Questions about this workshop?  Email askdata@duke.edu

DVS Workshop: Making Data Visual

Thu, Sep 29, 2016
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Bostock Library 023(Library Classroom)
The process of making data visual can be nuanced and iterative. Sometimes we start a project with a very specific idea of the kind of visualization we want, but other times we may not be sure what will work best. This workshop will address three important aspects of making data visual: identifying the goal of your visualization, identifying the audience of your visualization, and understanding the pros and cons of different types of visualizations. This workshop will focus not on any specific software application, but instead will focus on helping attendees develop instincts for what kinds of visualizations match well with particular datasets, goals, and audiences. The emphasis for this workshop will be on standard visualization types, like bar charts and scatter plots, rather than non-traditional visualizations or graphics.

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