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DVS Workshop: ArcGIS Online

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Mon, 2016-02-15 18:00
Mon, Feb 15, 2016
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Bostock Library Room 023 (Library Classroom)
ArcGIS Online is an online mapping application be used independently of desktop GIS (on both Mac and PCs).  Users can create web maps, store and share spatial data online, and create presentations.  In this workshop we will talk about ArcGIS Online accounts, as well as demonstrate how to add data to ArcGIS Online, perform analysis, and publish maps to the web.

VFF: Interactive Mapping Apps with R and Shiny

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2016-02-12 17:00
Fri, Feb 12, 2016
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
LSRC D106
High quality visualization of maps and data is vital for research and communication. Generating such visualization tools is increasingly easy, especially for R programmers. Using Shiny, a simple interactive visualization tool, you can create useful and beautiful apps both for research and communication purposes. We will demonstrate the use of Shiny R, show some exploratory and outreach apps, and point to some resources for making similar apps on your own.

VFF: Visualization Friday Forum

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2016-02-12 17:00
Fri, Feb 12, 2016
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

Adam Smith’s Invisible Hand

Preservation Underground - Fri, 2016-02-12 16:25

This coming summer Duke will host a 2016 NEH Summer Institute, titled “The History of Political Economy”. In preparation, the library is putting together a small exhibit of complementary materials from our collection. One of the items that will be on display is our first edition set of what is widely considered to be Adam Smith’s magnum opus,  An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of NationsSmith’s 1776 text is most commonly known for coining the phrase “the invisible hand” to describe forces which guide free markets.

I am a big fan of the NPR podcast Planet Money, and over the years I have learned quite a bit about the significance of Smith (and this work in particular) through the show. Therefore, I was very excited to for the opportunity to examine this item and address some of the condition issues for each volume.  While Smith is mentioned frequently on Planet Money, two episodes explore the man and his work in greater depth:  “Adam Smith, Mama’s Boy” and “Adam Smith and the Not So Invisible Hand“.

The two volumes of this edition are in matching tightback bindings with single raised sewing supports. The spine and corners are covered in green goatskin with green marbled paper siding-up the boards. The spines are extensively decorated with gold tooling and there is some blind tooling on the faces of the boards. While I cannot determine if these are the original bindings, they appear to be contemporary to the text. The goal of this treatment was to stabilize each book, reattaching any loose pieces and making the bindings functional for safe display or use in the reading room. My repairs attempt to satisfy this goal with minimal alteration to the appearance of the books.

The first volume was in better condition, but had been damaged at the tail of the spine. The joints were splitting along this panel, the tailcap was missing entirely, and the leather was continuing to lift where the damage had occurred.

Volume 1 -Before and After TreatmentVolume 1 -Before and After Treatment (click image to enlarge)

While the sewing supports all remained intact and the boards were securely attached, the splitting along the tail end joints and the risk of additional loss was a concern. After fully lifting the leather away from the tail panel of the spine, the textblock spine was lined with thin Japanese paper and wheat starch paste. An extended lining of bias-cut airplane linen was then adhered on top. The extended pieces of this lining were split and adhered on either side of the board using David Brock’s board reattachment method. Finally, the volume was rebacked with a thick Kozo fiber Japanese paper, toned to match the original leather. All original covering materials were readhered.

The front board of the second volume was nearly detached, hanging on by just a single thread! I began by carefully lifting the leather at the boards and spine to gain access to the textblock.

Volume 2 - Before and AfterVolume 2 – Before and After

As with the first volume, new structural board attachment was created with bias-cut linen transverse spine linings. The spine was rebacked with toned Kozo paper and the original covering materials were re-adhered. The edges of the reback material were lined up with the edges of the existing leather, to visually blend the repair materials with the original covering.

Repairs to the interior of the text were kept to a minimum as well.

Volume 1 front endsheets - Before and AfterVolume 1 front endsheets – Before and After

It appears that the endsheets of both volumes had been replaced at some point with a thin wove paper. These new endsheets had become creased and were developing cracks and tears along the folds. Using local humidification techniques, the creases were flattened and tears were mended with thin Korean papers, toned to match.

The second volume features an interesting blank leaf with a large bookplate adhered to the recto.

Volume 2 bookplate - Before and AfterVolume 2 bookplate – Before and After

The catalog record indicates that this item once belonged to Prince Lieven, the Russian ambassador to London from 1812-1834. This leaf is currently around 1/4″ shorter than the rest of the textblock and had a very poorly repaired tear along the head edge near the spine. During treatment, I was able to release this repaired piece and reattach it correctly along the tear. Strangely, when the torn corner was put back into place, the height of the leaf matched the rest of the textblock. My best guess is that the top edge of this leaf had become damaged at some point. Possibly when the new endsheets were added, this leaf was hastily repaired and trimmed down to have straight edges.

The last issue for me to deal with was the somewhat awkward enclosure. In more recent years, someone had constructed a double slipcase for the two volumes.

 Double Slipcase: Before Treatment:

Each volume was also placed inside a cloth-covered 4-flap enclosure. 201516_107a_bt02

This was actually an enclosure solution that I had not seen before, and is a nice addition to my post about restraining enclosures. While the 4-flap does mitigate some of the dangers of a slipcase that a standard chemise cannot cover, having two books in one slipcase makes handling much more difficult. The case doesn’t have pull tabs or an easy way to extract a single book. The user must tip the entire set forward so that both books will slide out simultaneously. As you can imagine, this can be quite dangerous if the user isn’t being observant. Additionally, the 4-flap creates a very large footprint when open (see above).  As these enclosures were made fairly recently and not artifactually significant, we discussed with the curator the option of replacing them with standard cloth-covered clamshell boxes.

201516_107_at01

With the new board attachment, consolidated covering materials, and simpler enclosures, Mr. Smith is ready for engagement with human hands again. Check back with our Exhibits Page to see when this and other exciting items from the collection go on display.

 

The post Adam Smith’s Invisible Hand appeared first on Preservation Underground.

Happy 25th, Webcam!

Rubenstein Technical Services - Fri, 2016-02-12 12:55
64 webcam

According to Wikipedia, the webcam era began in 1991 when a camera was aimed at a coffee pot in a Cambridge University lounge and left on for a decade. Nowadays it’s commonplace to communicate via video-conferencing, FaceTime, Skype or other video-phone platforms but the technology has only been widely available for a relatively short time. In the mid-1950s links between  telephones and televisions were developed, but the public only saw the technology for the first time at the 1964 World’s Fair, which also introduced touch-tone phones. Industrial trade ads touting the ability to send phone signals to television screens appeared in the early 1960s, and consumer possibilities of what were then called “Picturephones” began to be marketed in 1963-1964, as seen in this 1964 ad from New York Telephone. It would take another 40 years before smartphones put telephone and video capabilities in the hands of most consumers worldwide.

NY Telephone 1964 picturephoneImage from JWT Competitive Advertisements Hartman Center

Post contributed by Rick Collier, Technical Services Archivist for the John. W. Hartman Center

The post Happy 25th, Webcam! appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

SSRI~ Workshop: Getting Started with Julia

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2016-02-12 02:00
Thu, Feb 11, 2016
9:00 PM - 2:00 AM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
Julia is a new programming language for numerical computing that aims to combine the flexibility of dynamic languages like Python or Matlab with the speed of Fortran or C. In this short course, we will introduce the basics of Julia programming with hands-on examples, give an overview of the Julia ecosystem for simulation and data analysis, and point out common pitfalls for those coming from other dynamic languages (R, Python, Matlab). We will focus on what makes Julia different and discuss where the language is headed in the future. A lunch break will be scheduled during the workshop, and lunch will be provided for participants. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

WOLA-Duke 2015 Human Right Book Award: Paper Cadavers, by Kirsten Weld

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-02-11 23:00
Thu, Feb 11, 2016
6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
The Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA) and Duke University have named Kirsten Weld's book, "Paper Cadavers: The Archives of Dictatorship in Guatemala" (Duke University Press, 2014) as the winner of the 2015 WOLA-Duke Human Rights Book Award. Weld will be at Duke University Libraries to receive the award, discuss and read from her book. The award presentation will be followed by a reception and book signing. "Paper Cadavers" documents the heroic effort of hundreds of idealistic, activist youth who rescued and organized the National Police records under the leadership of a former guerrilla, Gustavo Meoño. In 2005, activists from the Human Rights Ombudsman's Office (PDH) of Guatemala, while inspecting police premises for improper storage of explosives in Guatemala City, accidentally came across a trove of 75 to 80 million half-moldy pages of National Police (PN) records. Kirsten Weld, assistant professor at Harvard University, shows how information once employed by the police state to control society and pursue subversives was put to use by the human rights community to reveal the identity of perpetrators of human rights abuses and to bring many of them to trial. In the words of the author, "Records once used in the service of state terror are repurposed by surviving reformers as building blocks for the rule of law and tools of social reckoning."

“Let’s all sit together:” Greensboro citizens respond to the 1960 Sit-Ins in the Edward R. Zane Papers

Rubenstein Technical Services - Thu, 2016-02-11 21:13
lets_all_sit_together

 

lets_all_sit_togetherExcerpt of letter supporting integration of Greensboro’s lunch counters, March 8, 1960. From the E. R. Zane Papers


This month marks the 56th anniversary of the Greensboro Sit-Ins, which began on February 1, 1960 when four African-American students from North Carolina A&T walked from the campus library to the local Woolworth store, sat down at the “whites only” lunch counter, were denied service but refused to leave until closing. Over the next week, several hundred protesters took part in the sit-ins at the Woolworth and later Kress department store in Greensboro.  The sit-ins grabbed national headlines and similar protests followed in towns across the South.

With the city in turmoil, Greensboro Mayor George Roach appointed an Advisory Committee on Community Relations to help coordinate a response to the sit-ins. He appointed Burlington Industries executive and city councilman Edward R. Zane to chair the newly formed committee. In his first act as chair, Zane issued a call to Greensboro citizens asking them to share their opinions on the “race issue.” Specifically, Zane encouraged citizens to send letters to the committee “expressing their views on recent racial problems,” and he laid out five possible solutions to the lunch counter integration question at Woolworth and Kress:

  1. The situation to remain as it is;
  2. The two establishments to remove seats and serve everyone standing;
  3. The two establishments to serve everyone seated;
  4. The two establishments to reserve separate areas for seated white people and seated Negroes;
  5. The two establishments to discontinue serving food.

The Rubenstein’s Edward Raymond Zane collection contains several hundred of these letters from Greensboro citizens from late February to early March 1960. The letters, written by both white and African-American citizens, express support for or opposition to integrated seating at the Woolworth and Kress lunch counters. In aggregate, they provide a window into race relations in the community and help document the prevailing arguments on both sides of the integration issue.

More than a half century later, we remember the Greensboro Sit-ins as one of the seminal events of the civil rights movement. To commemorate the sit-ins, a portion of the Woolworth lunch counter now resides in the Smithsonian and four stools from the counter are on display in the International Civil Rights Center & Museum in Greensboro. The letters in the Zane collection are less tangible than these powerful artifacts, but provide more direct evidence of one community’s response to direct action protests and serve as testimony to the bravery and courage of the Greensboro Four and other civil rights pioneers who ignited a movement to challenge segregation in public accommodations throughout the South.

separate_but_equalExcerpt of letter favoring separate but equal seating arrangements, March 1, 1960. From the E. R. Zane Papers

 

what_does_american_negro_wantExcerpt of letter supporting integration, March 7, 1960. From the E. R. Zane Papers.

 

insulting_remarks_offensive_languageExcerpt of letter opposing integrated lunch counters, March 16, 1960. From the E. R. Zane Papers.

 

willa_b_player_bennett_collegeLetter from Bennet College President Willa B. Player, the first African American woman to become president of a four-year college, March 11, 1960. Over 40 percent of Bennet College students were arrested and jailed during the Greensboro demonstrations. From the E. R. Zane Papers

 

veteranExcerpt of letter from veteran in favor of integrated lunch counters, February 29, 1960. From the E. R. Zane Papers give_an_inchExcerpt of letter opposing integrated lunch counters, February 28, 1960

 

communist_cropExcerpt from pro-segregation letter, March 11, 1960. From the E. R. Zane Papers

 

Post contributed by Noah Huffman, Archivist for Metadata and Encoding. 

The post “Let’s all sit together:” Greensboro citizens respond to the 1960 Sit-Ins in the Edward R. Zane Papers appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

DVS Workshop: Easy Interactive Charts and Maps with Tableau

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-02-11 18:30
Thu, Feb 11, 2016
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Bostock Library Room 023 (Library Classroom)
Tableau Public (available for both Windows and Mac) is free software that allows individuals to quickly create interactive visualizations of their research and business analytics data.  This workshop will focus on using Tableau Public to create data visualizations, starting with an overview of the structure of the program and the terminology used. The workshop will include a sample data visualization and mapping project, focusing especially on some of the new features in Tableau Public 9. We will also discuss publishing to the Tableau Public web server and related services and tools, like the full Tableau Desktop application (free for full-time students).

CIT Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-02-11 18:00
Thu, Feb 11, 2016
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning.

SSRI~ Workshop: Getting Started with Julia

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-02-11 14:00
Thu, Feb 11, 2016
9:00 AM - 2:00 PM
SSRI-Gross Hall 230E
Julia is a new programming language for numerical computing that aims to combine the flexibility of dynamic languages like Python or Matlab with the speed of Fortran or C. In this short course, we will introduce the basics of Julia programming with hands-on examples, give an overview of the Julia ecosystem for simulation and data analysis, and point out common pitfalls for those coming from other dynamic languages (R, Python, Matlab). We will focus on what makes Julia different from other scientific or technical programming languages and discuss where the language is headed in the future. To make the most use of this course, participants should ideally have a basic understanding of another programming or scripting language so that programming concepts are familiar from the beginning of the course. A lunch break will be scheduled during the workshop, and lunch will be provided for participants. Registration required; please click "more information" to access the registration form.

Now Digitized: Every Duke Chronicle from the 1970s

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Thu, 2016-02-11 13:46
70s Chronicle Digitized

The grooviest decade at Duke is now digitized and available online

Now Digitized: Every Duke Chronicle from the 1970s

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Thu, 2016-02-11 13:46
70s Chronicle Digitized

The grooviest decade at Duke is now digitized and available online

DVS Workshop: Basic Data Cleaning and Analysis for Data Tables

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-02-10 18:30
Wed, Feb 10, 2016
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Bostock Library Room 023 (Library Classroom)
Tables of data, like those you see in spreadsheets or relational databases, are the foundation of most data-driven research today.  There are many pitfalls of working with these tables, though, that most people end up having to learn the hard way.  In this workshop, we'll take a dataset that has a variety of different properties and learn to work through many common steps of data-driven research to clean and begin analyzing the data.  We'll be using Excel to make sure the methods we suggest can be reproduced easily "at home," but many of these techniques are important for other data analysis tools as well. No data experience necessary.

OIT's Learn IT @ Lunch: Link Equipment Road Show

Edge Events - Wed, 2016-02-10 17:00
Wed, Feb 10, 2016: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Edge: Workshop Room

Presenter: Erik Piper - Link Team Lead w/ Link staff

Did you know that the Link (in Perkins Library) offer a wide range of equipment such as webcams, high-definition video cameras & tripods available for check out. The equipment is available to all students, faculty and staff! Come to this session to learn more about what equipment is available. There will be time built into the session to play around with the equipment & ask questions. http://link.duke.edu


OIT's Learn IT @ Lunch: Link Equipment Road Show

Edge + Digital Scholarship Events - Wed, 2016-02-10 17:00
Wed, Feb 10, 2016
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Edge: Workshop Room

OIT's Learn IT @ Lunch: Link Equipment Road Show

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-02-10 17:00
Wed, Feb 10, 2016
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Edge: Workshop Room

Research Computing: So many options for a virtual machine - How do I choose?

Edge + Digital Scholarship Events - Wed, 2016-02-10 15:00
Wed, Feb 10, 2016
10:00 AM - 11:30 PM
Edge: Workshop Room

CIT Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-02-10 15:00
Wed, Feb 10, 2016
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning.

Research Computing: So many options for a virtual machine - How do I choose?

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-02-10 15:00
Wed, Feb 10, 2016
10:00 AM - 11:30 PM
Edge: Workshop Room

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