Feed aggregator

Color Bars and Test Patterns

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Fri, 2016-06-24 19:16
ColorBars600x360

Wherein we reveal the purpose of those patterns you see at the beginning of old videos

Extreme Enclosures, part 1

Preservation Underground - Fri, 2016-06-24 14:00

Written by Tedd Anderson, Conservation Technician

My love of extreme things (extreme sports, extreme reality television) has led me to create a two part blog series:  EXTREME ENCLOSURES.

the boo box from "Hook"An example of a beloved extreme enclosure, the Boo Box, from “Hook.”

In part one, I will detail the creation of four Andre-the-Giant-sized cloth-covered telescoping boxes for our cherished Audubon’s Birds of America.  Part two will chronicle the construction of corrugated clamshell boxes (aka “drop spine boxes” or “pizza boxes”) for the few hundred miniature books held by Rubenstein Library.

audubon scaleThose are some BBB’s (big, beautiful books). Boxing The Audubons

Audubon’s Birds of America is a four volume set of double elephant folios containing life size prints made from engraved plates.  Each volume has a footprint of around 40 inches x 27 inches, and weighs around 47 pounds. When making an enclosure for a book this gigantic there are a few things to keep in mind: the weight of the item after boxing, and the area of the materials needed to construct the box.  Measures need to be taken to ensure the box itself isn’t too heavy. Per Beth’s suggestion, I used double-walled corrugated board for the bottom tray. Double-walled corrugated board would lend adequate support while also being significantly lighter than a tray made of double walled binder’s board.

One problem: the sheets of double walled corrugated are not large enough to create a box this big.  Using a micro spatula, I peeled one layer off each sheet and laminated two sheets of corrugated together with a Polyvinyl Acetate (PVA) and Methyl cellulose mix.

laminating corrugatedPeel one layer off the bottom of the top sheet, one layer off the top of the bottom sheet.

 

laminating corrugatedKeep adequate weight on the sheet while it dries so as to avoid warping.

Once the sheet is dry I can construct the bottom tray and cover it with cloth.  I chose a tray that had three fixed walls and one collapsible wall that would facilitate removal of the book.  Working with wet adhesive and corrugated board was the most frustrating step of all.  Unlike binder’s board, corrugated will buckle under pressure from my bone folder.  When adhering the cloth, I had to be very careful of how hard I pressed.  A ginger touch was key.  The corrugated also felt unstable while the adhesive was wet.  The inner corners of the tray were especially wonky after getting all the cloth laid down, making me feel as though all was lost. This wonkiness did, however, subside after adequate time had been given for the adhesive to dry.  Once dry, the tray was remarkably strong.

covering bottom tray‘Tis a rough road, the path of the corrugated…one might even describe it as extreme.

 

collapsible sideAttaching the collapsible wall.

Moving on to the top tray was a reprieve.  What a cake walk!  The top tray was constructed like any cloth covered box; a single wall of binder’s board.  The cloth stuck to that binder’s board like a Californian on a skateboard.  The main challenge was adhering large swaths of cloth consistently to avoid air bubbles.

top trayThis step was such a cake walk, I had to keep myself from imagining these bricks were cakes.

 

covering top trayIf I flipped the whole tray over, it resembled an oversized sheet cake.

Next I created Velcro tabs to adhere in between the tray and the outer lip to keep the top and bottom lids securely fastened when the box is handled.  I lined the Velcro with book cloth and shaved down the Velcro parts that would be placed in between the tray and the lip to reduce their swell.  Making sure the Velcro strips stayed stuck to the tray was an issue.  The PVA often had trouble keeping the plasticized Velcro in place, making it easy to dislodge the strips.  I found that once the lip had been firmly adhered, the strips stayed in place.

velcro tabsLining and shaving the Velcro strips.

 

velcro tabsAdhering Velcro before adhering outer lip.

Next comes adhering the outer board to the tray.  Because this behemoth would not fit in any of our presses and the area of the tray was impossible to adhere in one go without adequate pressure, I resorted to a multiple-step-adherence-approach.  I used brick weights for an initial gluing.  Once dry, I had to re-glue each corner, one at a time, and place each corner into the press with blocks.  I rigged up an extreme support system for the tray while in the press:  a stool.

adhering trayStep one: Bricks.

 

adhering trayStep Two: Press with Duke Stool Support System™

And finally, the finishing touches: labels.

finishing touchLike an expertly landed kick flip.

13 finishing touch pt1

Upon fitting the item into the box I weighed the item with its enclosure.  It totaled a whopping 66 pounds. The book weighed 47lbs, and the box 19 pounds.  Saving a bit of weight on this box kept us from reaching into the twenty-pound range on the enclosure alone.

fits like a gloveIt fits! No meltdown needed. weightMy first 66 pounder.

But alas, we must always say goodbye.  In extreme circumstances, I prefer to keep my eyes closed so as to avoid crying.

goodbye audubonsEmotions run high.

The Audubon’s have settled down in their new homes.  Although they continue to amaze visitors of Duke University with their awe-inspiring depictions of the Birds of America, their bindings are no longer at risk in un-enclosed spaces.

Stay tuned for Part Two of Extreme Enclosures:  Extreme Miniatures.

The post Extreme Enclosures, part 1 appeared first on Preservation Underground.

CIT Open Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-06-23 17:00
Thu, Jun 23, 2016
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED.

CIT Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-06-23 17:00
Thu, Jun 23, 2016
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning.

Franklin Research Center Collections Intern

Jobs Combined Feed From Huginn - Thu, 2016-06-23 16:05
<div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>This position is part of a Mellon-funded project to develop a new documentary website on the history and impact of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.  Under the supervision of the Director of the Franklin Research Center, this position will primarily provide support for technical and research services activities for new acquisitions related to the history of SNCC and the Civil Rights Movement.  The Collections Intern will also assist in identifying and coordinating access to materials that may be held in private hands or in other institutions that would enrich the website.</p></div></div></div>

SNCC Digital Gateway Project Intern

Jobs Combined Feed From Huginn - Wed, 2016-06-22 15:55
<div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>This position is part of a Mellon-funded project to develop a new documentary website on the history and legacy of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.  Under the supervision of the SNCC Digital Gateway Project Manager, this position will primarily provide research support and aid in the development of written content for the website. The Project Intern will assist in writing concise historical narrative pieces, identifying primary source material to be integrated into the website, fact checking, and copyediting.</p></div></div></div>

SNCC Digital Gateway Project Intern – INTERNAL APPLICANTS ONLY

Jobs Combined Feed From Huginn - Wed, 2016-06-22 15:55
<div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>This position is part of a Mellon-funded project to develop a new documentary website on the history and legacy of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.  Under the supervision of the SNCC Digital Gateway Project Manager, this position will primarily provide research support and aid in the development of written content for the website. The Project Intern will assist in writing concise historical narrative pieces, identifying primary source material to be integrated into the website, fact checking, and copyediting.</p></div></div></div>

CIT Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-06-22 14:00
Wed, Jun 22, 2016
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning.

Blue Devil of the Week: Elizabeth Dunn

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Mon, 2016-06-20 19:27
dunnbluedevil600x360 copy

Librarian helps researchers explore the riches of the Rubenstein Library

Blue Devil of the Week: Elizabeth Dunn

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Mon, 2016-06-20 19:27
dunnbluedevil600x360 copy

Librarian helps researchers explore the riches of the Rubenstein Library

From the Conservation Lab: Spine After Spine

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Mon, 2016-06-20 14:23
spine600x360

A routine repair reveals layers of previous attempts to prolong a book’s life

From the Conservation Lab: Spine After Spine

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Mon, 2016-06-20 14:23
spine600x360

A routine repair reveals layers of previous attempts to prolong a book’s life

Spine After Spine*

Preservation Underground - Fri, 2016-06-17 20:12

*sung to the tune of Cindy Lauper’s Time After Time

Older bound volumes in a research library collection have often been subjected to multiple interventions or campaigns of repair over the years. If a leather-bound volume has not been completely rebound, it has often been repaired in some visible way. One of the more common repair practices is rebacking, in which either new material is added underneath the leather covering the spine and boards or the spine is replaced entirely. In preparing the book for rebacking, original covering material may be removed, obscuring evidence of previous repair efforts. This second edition of the works of Samuel Johnson, printed in 1713, is more like an onion with many layers of repair material.

Works of Samuel Johnson, Spine #1

The current binding appears roughly contemporary to the text. It is covered in full brown calfskin and decorated with sprinkling and blind tooling in a style commonly referred to as the “Cambridge Panel“.  Many decades ago, this book was actually part of Duke’s circulating collection and was repaired using the typical techniques employed by libraries at that time. A strip of green buckram was adhered to the boards and spine with an acrylic adhesive and the inner hinges were repaired with strips of white textile. The repair is doing it’s job by keeping the boards on, but it is a little awkward. What used to be a tight-joint binding, now has a space between the shoulder of the textblock and the spine edge of the board. This pushes the boards out at the fore-edge and creates an unnaturally large square.

Title Page

In my initial examination, it was clear that the book had been repaired before the green buckram, too. The endsheets had been replaced with a smooth, wove paper and somewhat crude sheepskin corner repairs were visible through the pastedown (see above). There is some obvious insect damage  at the corners of the front board, but interestingly the insects appear to have only liked the new repair materials. The original text and calf leather are un-chewed.

In discussing treatment options with the curatorial staff, it was clear that the unsightly cloth repairs should come off of this book. When I separated the binding from the textblock, though, I found another leather spine underneath.

Spine #2

This is not the original spine of the binding. It appears to be a reback using the same sheepskin as the corner repairs. Most of the red leather label remains in the second panel, but the leather is quite powdery and large patches of the grain layer have peeled away. After further deliberation, the decision was made to also remove this spine material, since it was not original and in very poor condition. During removal of the second spine, however, something else was revealed.

Spine #3

A gilt ‘W’ and a tiny piece of gold line are visible in the second spine panel. Could this be the remains of a third (and possibly original) spine? It is unclear.  While it does not appear that a full calfskin spine is underneath the sheepskin reback, it is possible that the reback was applied on top of small remains of the original spine. It is also possible that titling was added directly to the reback leather, but then because  of error or damage a red leather label was added later.

The textblock spine will be cleaned and lined with strong, high quality materials like Japanese paper and unbleached linen to create a better functioning book. The results will certainly be better than just following tradition and adding another spine on top.

The post Spine After Spine* appeared first on Preservation Underground.

CIT Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2016-06-16 17:00
Thu, Jun 16, 2016
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning.

Plato's styles and characters : between literature and philosophy

Endeca eBooks Last Week - Thu, 2016-06-16 00:00

Published: Berlin : De Gruyter, [2016]

Currently held at: DUKE

Evening Reference Librarian and Supervisor, Lilly Library

Jobs Combined Feed From Huginn - Wed, 2016-06-15 17:38
<div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Reporting to the Head, East Campus Libraries, the Evening Reference Librarian and Supervisor is responsible for research services and overseeing access and delivery services activities in Lilly Library during the second and/or third shifts in the fall and spring semesters.  S/he is responsible for the supervision of the evening student assistants, modeling customer service skills and overseeing their access services duties. During the summer sessions, the schedule will adjust to first shift, which includes a continuation of desk coverage as well as work on special projects as assigned.</p></div></div></div>

CIT Office Hours

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2016-06-15 14:00
Wed, Jun 15, 2016
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Bostock Library Room 024 (CIT Instructional Technology Lab)
Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning.

Black gods of the asphalt : religion, hip-hop, and street basketball

test-endeca-feed - Wed, 2016-06-15 00:00

Author: Woodbine, Onaje X. O., author.
Published: New York : Columbia University Press, [2016]

Currently held at: DUKE

Black gods of the asphalt : religion, hip-hop, and street basketball

test-endeca-feed - Mon, 2016-06-13 00:00

Author: Woodbine, Onaje X. O.,|author.
Published: New York : Columbia University Press, [2016]

Currently held at: OUPP

Pages

Subscribe to Duke University Libraries aggregator