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A-Z List of Collections

  • Over 7,000 U.S. and Canadian advertisements covering five product categories - Beauty and Hygiene, Radio, Television, Transportation, and World War II propaganda - dated between 1911 and 1955.
  • Thousands of television commercials created or collected by the D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles (DMB&B) advertising agency, dated 1950s - 1980s.
  • Images and transcripts form three digital collections: Hannah Valentine and Lethe Jackson Slave Letters, 1837-1838; Vilet Lester Slave Letter, 1857; and Elizabeth Johnson Harris: Life Story, 1867-1923.
  • Approximately 1,800 broadsides and song sheets from nineteenth-century America.
  • 750 photographs of every-day life in the Soviet Union (1919-1921 and 1930) from the papers of Robert L. Eichelberger and Frank Whitson Fetter.
  • Image database containing 3 collections: Archivision Digital Research Photo Library; Art, Art History & Visual Studies Resource Center; and: Saskia Ltd Art and Architecture Images.
  • A selection of 100 recorded oral history interviews chronicling African American life during the age of legal segregation in the American South, from the 1890s to the 1950s.
  • Thousands of broadsides, pamphlets, form letters, posters, newspapers, tickets, and other printed items on a wide range of topics from across the United States.
  • Materials related to Cuban, Dominican and Haitian maritime migration from 1965-1996, including camps at the U.S. Naval Station, Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, 1991-1996.
  • Advertisements and transcripts of Chinese documentary films and newsreels, many from the Cultural Revolution, 1966-1976. Access to this digital collection requires the DjVu Browser Plug-in by LizardTech.
  • Images and transcripts form three digital collections: Rose O'Neal Greenhow Papers, 1860-1864; Alice Williamson Diary, 1864; and Sarah E. Thompson Papers, 1859-1898.
  • Photos, letters, and scrapbooks related to the construction of the Duke campus.
  • Approximately 1,850 photographs shot in Cuba between 1963 and 1964 and processed by Alberto Korda on the island.
  • Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel interviews with prominent artists, circa 1970-1985.
  • Primary sources documenting the economic, social, cultural, and political history of Durham, N.C., from the 1870s through the 1920s.
  • Images and transcripts related to the radical origins of the Women's Liberation Movement in the United States during the late 1960s and early 1970s.
  • 168 audio and video recordings made at the Duke University Chapel between 1955 and 1995.
  • Digitized issues of the Duke Chronicle, the university’s student newspaper, dating from fall 1959 to spring 1970.
  • Images of 584 covers from Duke football game programs.
  • Images and explanatory descriptions of Duke's collection of nearly 1400 papyri from ancient Egypt.
  • Duke Yearlook is produced by the Duke University Archives to provide alumni and friends of Duke with a virtual yearbook of campus scenes.
  • The official magazine of the College of Engineering (Pratt School of Engineering) at Duke University, including 205 issues published from 1940 to 2013.
  • Over 2,800 advertising items and publications dating from 1850 to 1920, illustrating the rise of consumer culture and the birth of a professionalized advertising industry in the United States.
  • Emma Spaulding Bryant wrote these ten letters to her husband, John Emory Bryant, in the summer of 1873. The letters reveal much about the relationships between husbands and wives in this era, and shed light on women's health issues that were often kept private.
  • Documents the social and cultural forces that shaped the everyday lives of women and men in America from 1800 to 1920. The project comprises images sourced from the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, Duke University and the New York Public Library.
  • Over 600 digitized photographs and publications from the Duke Medical Center Archives document the history of Duke Medicine's academic, clinical, and research activities from 1927 through 1950.
  • 25 photographs from Frank Espada’s Puerto Rican Diaspora Documentary Project (1979-1981).
  • Approximately 120 photographs taken by a German Naval officer during the Boxer Rebellion in China in 1900.
  • 100 black-and-white photos shot by Gary Monroe from 1980 to 1998 in Haiti, in Haitian neighborhoods in Florida, and in Krome Camp, Florida, where Haitian refugees are detained by the U.S. government.
  • Transcript of a U.S. officer's diary about the American invasion and occupation of the Philippine Islands.
  • The Rubenstein Library holds two documents from the papers of Jean Baptiste Pierre Aime Colheux de Longpré, a French colonizer of Saint-Domingue (Haiti). The first is a very rare manuscript copy of the Haitian Declaration of Independence (1804). This declaration by the army of black Haitians established the first black republic in the world. The second is an excerpted copy of a will for Monsieur de la Martinier (1799) which mentions those with family members who became key Haitian revolutionaries.
  • Provides access to digital images for over 3,000 pieces from the collection, published in the United States between 1850 and 1920.
  • The Medical Center Library's Historical Images in Medicine (HIM) collections encompass over 3,000 photographs, illustrations, engravings, and bookplates from the history of the health and life sciences.
  • Hundreds of portraits made by an itinerant photographer who rode the trains to the small towns of North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia.
  • Articles and advertising images of Protestant children and families in the U.S. from Protestant-supported or targeted magazines.
  • Includes 108 Italian cultural and political posters mostly dating from the 1970s-1980s, including many created by the Partito comunista italiano.
  • 131 photos from several of Andrews’ projects, including portraits from North Carolina, Virginia, and New York City; and photographs of Halifax and Pittsylvania counties.
  • Internally produced newsletters from The J. Walter Thompson Company between 1916 and 1986.
  • 12 Woodcuts by Roger Fry and the manuscript of Elizabeth and Essex written in Lytton Strachey's hand with 7 miscellaneous ms. letters.
  • Correspondence, project files, subject files, and publications documenting the human rights activism of the Rabbi Marshall T. Meyer in 1970s and 1980s Argentina.
  • Over 600 advertising items and publications dating from 1850 to 1920, illustrating the rise of consumer culture and the birth of a professionalized advertising industry in the United States.
  • 117 photographs of men, women, and children taken between 1912-1934 by Blake who opened one of the first African-American photography studios in Charleston, S.C.
  • 52 caricatures from Musée des Horreurs and 3 caricatures from Musée des Patriotes depicting the anti-Semitic sentiment in France during the Dreyfus Affair, published between 1899 and 1900.
  • 580 photographs depicting life in Bainbridge, Georgia from 1960-2001, and several manuscripts by the photographer.
  • Nearly 10,000 photographs of billboards and other outdoor advertising, mostly on the Atlantic City Boardwalk from the 1920s to 1950s.
  • Shows how the U.S. government controlled and conserved vehicles, typewriters, sugar, shoes, fuel, and food.
  • A portal to more than 20,000 images of outdoor advertisements from four different source collections.
  • 289 photographs and contact sheets made between 1957 and 1973 primarily in London and New York City.
  • Consists of 75 Russian posters, documenting almost 60 years of Communist political advertising (1920s-1980s).
  • Collection documenting the life and work of activist and organizer, Sam Reed, and the organization he founded, the Trumpet of Conscience, 1987-2000.
  • Approximately 5,000 photographs, primarily of China, 1917-1932.
  • Digital collection documents key aspects of the history of slavery worldwide over six centuries. Content from the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University, as well as several other North American and European libraries.
  • Rare and unusual publications of music for string quartet.
  • Over 900 images from various collections held by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University.
  • Three issues of the comic book series Vica by Vincent Krassousky produced in France during World War II.
  • Manuscript drafts and revisions of Whitman's poetry and prose as well as proofs and published versions of his work from his early career in journalism up through the end of his life. Part of the Trent Collection of Whitmaniana in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University.
  • Portraits of 200 military officers and "notorious characters" of the Confederacy.
  • The 5,000 item collection documents Gedney's work from the 1950s to 1989. Subjects include photographs of cross country road trips; rural New York; Manhattan; Brooklyn; rural Kentucky; Hippies in San Francisco; composers; gay rallies and demonstrations; St. Joseph's School for the Deaf; India; England; Ireland; France; and, a large number of nocturnal pictures.
  • Manifestos, speeches, essays, and other materials documenting various aspects of the Women's Movement in the United States in the 1960s and 1970s.
  • Over 100 diaries written by British and American women who documented their travels to places around the globe, including India, the West Indies, countries in Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, as well as around the United States.