Colonel Clarke---a la Capt. Jinks

Colonel Clarke--- a la Capt. Jinks.

I’m Colonel Clarke of the State melish,
And I strut like Saul the son of Kish,
I feel quite proud of my high posish,
As Colonel in Holden’s army.
I teach the niggers how to drill,
How to drill, I’ll teach them still,
I’ll teach the niggers how to drill,
As soldiers in Holden’s army.

Spoken.—Yes, my countrymen; for the third
time I gird on my sword at the call of my native
State. Feeble and sore-broken, suffering daily,
and often excruciatingly, from wounds received
in two wars, I had hoped to spend the few re-
maining years of my life in the quiet of domes-
tic retirement; but Gov. Holden has called and
I obey the summons, proud to feel that

I’m Colonel Clarke of the State melish,
And I strut like Saul the son of Kish,
As proud as sin of the high posish,
I hold in the Governor’s army.

I volunteered to Mexico,
Of course that was some years ago,
And gained some laurels then, you know,
As Captain in the army.
When I got on my epaulette,
My epaulette, a bran new set,
When I got on my epaulette,
I thought I’d die for the army.

Spoken.—But my feelings then were nothing
to what they were when the Governor appointed
me in this State troops. As I said in my late
circular, I entered upon this last campaign with
earnest prayers to Almighty God to direct me
in all my doings with his most gracious favor,
and further me with his continued help, in an
honest and energetic endeavor to restore peace
and tranquility, law and order, in North caro-
lina not forgetting that

I’m Colonel Clarke of the State melish,
And strut like Saul the son of kish,
Exalted to the high posish
Of a place in Holden’s army.

I next became a good Confed,
And longed to take Abe Lincoln’s head,
As “our beloved” did, tis said,
As I fought in the secesh army.
The stars and bars at last “played out,”
My coat I then turned inside out,
The stars and bars they soon played out,
And I came home from the army.

Spoken.—Yes, I turned my coat, (not the
spiketail I wore in the late campaign), inside
out—had to do it, or not get an office under the
Radical administration. But the Governor,
God bless him, in the great difficulty forced
upon him to get somebody to command his ne-
gro State Troops, remembered me, and, as I
said in my circular, the civil arm was paralyzed
and a regin of terror inaugurated in our midst,
and therefore, no course was left me but to
raise a military force, and march at its head to
Ralaigh, as

Colonel Clarke of the State melish,
As proud as Saul the son of Kish,
Exalted to the high posish
Of Colonel in Holden’s army.

But now I’m done with warlike sport,
No doubt you’ve heard the late report,
I’m Judge of the Superior court,
For my services in the army.
My honors come so fast and thick,
So fast and thick, I hope they’ll stick,
My honors come so fast and thick,
For service in Holden’s army.

Spoken.—Some thought I would decline the
Judgeship and hold on to the Senatorial seat to
which I was elected while out on my last cam-
paign; but if any thought or hoped such a
thing, he must have been Greene. Such a mili-
tary career as mine is not chronicled in every
generation, and there is no more fitting reward
for such glorious military exploits as I have
performed, especially in suppressing the great
riot in Raleigh on the day of election, than to
clothe the war-worn and sore-broken form of
the veteran hero in the judicial ermine. But
no wreath of civic honor will ever extinguish
the ecstacy that glowed in my breast on that
day, when, for the third time, I girded on the
sword at the call of my native State, and felt
that

I, was Colonel Clarke of the State melish,
As proud as Saul the son of kish,
And gloried in the grand posish
Of Colonel in Holden’s army.

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