Lilly Library blog posts

Subscribe to Lilly Library blog posts feed
Updated: 48 min 6 sec ago

Focus Group Participants Needed (Free Food!)

Wed, 04/02/2014 - 20:41

We’re looking for undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty to participate in one-hour focus groups.

Your opinion counts! Share your thoughts about ways to improve and enhance library services, collections, and spaces in a one-hour moderated focus group. In return, we’ll feed you!

Here in the Libraries, we’re always trying to up our game. To help us serve our Duke students and faculty better, we conduct periodic focus groups with undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty members.

Your opinion counts! Share your input and make a difference. Focus groups help us improve our existing services and develop new ones to meet emerging needs. Click on the links below to be part of a focus group session.

Focus Groups for Undergraduates

 

Focus Groups for Graduate Students

 

Focus Group for Faculty

Customized Searching and Other Website Updates

Wed, 04/02/2014 - 14:28

Use the gear icon to change your default search to Articles, All, or Our Website.

We’ve received a lot of great feedback since we launched our redesigned library website earlier this year, but that doesn’t mean it couldn’t benefit from a few tweaks. Our website team has been working on some small but helpful changes, based on web metrics, usability testing, survey feedback, and suggestions from YOU!

The first change you might have noticed is the light green gear icon in the bottom left corner of the search box. Clicking on the gear allows you to set your personal default search preference. If you spend more time searching for journal articles rather than books, you can set “Articles” as your preferred search tab, and it will appear as the default every time you visit the library homepage. You can change the setting at any time. (The gear works with browser cookies, so if you clear your cache, you will have to reset it.)

Another addition, implemented at the request of many users, is the addition of a website search box in the upper right corner of the masthead. This makes it easier to search our website and find information about the Libraries.

The new Research Commons page explains what you can expect from the renovations in Bostock.

With the announcement about the upcoming construction of the Research Commons on the first floor of Bostock Library, we also added a page about that project, including a timeline, FAQs, sketches of the new layout, and more. You can find it by clicking on “Research Support” in the header of our website and following the “Research Commons” link in the drop-down menu.

We are continually refining and testing our redesigned website, and we greatly appreciate all the feedback our users have given us along the way. Your input (and patience) has helped us create a better, simpler, more intuitively organized library site for all Duke students, faculty, and researchers. If you have additional suggestions for improvement, or to report a problem with our website, let us know!

Manga Fan? The Duke University Libraries Have You Covered! Part II

Mon, 03/17/2014 - 17:40

Guest post by William Hanley, Library Associate in Electronic Resources and Serials Management, manga expert and fan extraordinaire

Manga: /ˈmaŋgə/
(from the Oxford Dictionary)

Noun:    a style of Japanese comic books and graphic novels, typically aimed at adults as well as children.

Origin:   1950’s: Japanese, from ‘man’ (indiscriminate) + ‘ga’ (picture) (translated as “whimsical drawings” or “impromptu sketches” in modern English)

While manga are enormously popular in Japan and are read by business people, university students and the elderly, as well as children, they have become a global phenomenon.  Many series have themes in academic areas such as psychology, environmental studies, gender roles, world history, cultural studies in general and, of course, Japanese cultural studies in particular.

In the summer of 2013, Lilly Library acquired several manga series of particular merit in these categories.

Yotsuba&!
by Kiyohiko Azuma
Meet Yotsuba, the most precocious girl ever!  This series chronicles the life of Yotsuba Koiwai, a five-year-old girl who is energetic, cheerful, curious and odd.  She is also initially ignorant about many things a child her age would be expected to know, among them doorbells, escalators, air conditioners and even playground swings.  This naiveté is the premise of many humorous stories where she learns about, and frequently misunderstands, everyday things. Besides being a comedy about the wonders of childhood, another key aspect of this manga is the myriad references to modern Japanese culture, such as Japanese cuisine, seasonal festivals and high school cultural festivals, as well as urban and rural landscapes.  Some Japanese terms are not translated in the manga but the publisher adds translations as footnotes.

 

Bakuman
story by Tsugumi Ohba, art by Takeshi Obata

A manga about creating manga, Bakuman follows talented artist Moritaka Mashiro and aspiring writer Akito Takagi, two ninth grade boys who wish to become mangaka (manga creators).  Although the main characters and their story are fictional, the process of creating manga and the business models for the publisher, Shonen Jump, are authentic.  Some characters resemble real authors and editors of Shonen Jump and many manga titles mentioned in Bakuman are also series published in Shonen Jump at that time.  Furthermore, each chapter comes with a bonus page showing an excerpt from writer Tsugumi Ohba’s rough-draft storyboard, artist Takeshi Obata’s reworking of the draft, and then the final product.  These pages answer the question on the minds of millions of manga fans, “how do they do that?”

 

Lilly Library also purchased three works, Monster, Pluto, and 20th Century Boys, by acclaimed manga writer and artist Naoki Urasawa.  In 2010, when a prominent Japanese magazine held a poll on the Mangaka that Changed the History of Manga, Urasawa was one of the top ten.  As a storyteller, he is known for his dense, multi-layered, interconnecting narratives and his mastery of suspense.  His works often focus on character development and psychological complexity.

 

Monster
by Naoki Urasawa

“…as exciting as an action movie, but with an added element of thought-provoking ethical debate.”  I believe this quote, from ComicsWorthReading.com, sums up this work really well.  Winner of multiple awards for best manga, including the sought-after Tezuka Cultural Prize in 2001, this psychological thriller tells the story of an outstanding surgeon and his involvement with a serial killer.  What makes this such a powerful work, is how Urasawa weaves his complex plot around the theme of an ethical dilemma, the decision of whether to save a life or take a life, and the irrevocable consequences of such a choice.

 

Pluto
by Naoki Urasawa

Another of Urasawa’s award-winning titles, Pluto is a retelling of a particular story arc of “Astro Boy”, the famous groundbreaking manga by Osamu Tezuka.  As with his other works, Urasawa spins a tale of psychological and philosophical themes, particularly those of identity, what it means to be human, and whether robots can have emotions.  It’s the imaginative world of the “God of Manga” Tezuka, mixed with Urasawa’s darker shades of ethical dilemmas.

 

20th Century Boys
by Naoki Urasawa

With adventure, mystery and Urasawa’s trademark layers of interwoven plotlines, 20th Century Boys is at heart the story of a gang of boys who try to save the world.  But within this simple premise lies several deeper questions.  Are some moments in history more important than others?  Can one chance childhood encounter have a cataclysmic impact far in to the future?  While one can never tell what will result from his or her actions, is it also impossible to discern which actions will have far-reaching implications?  20th Century Boys plays on our desire to know the answers to such questions as well as our desire to reconcile the nostalgia of our past with the fear of our future.

Other landmark manga titles that have been in the Library’s collection for some time prior to last year include:

Lone Wolf and Cub
story by Kazuo Koike, art by Goseki Kojima

The genre of the wandering, avenging samurai is well known even to western cultures.  Lone Wolf and Cub is perhaps the most influential manga written on this subject.  The series chronicles the story of Ogami Itto, the Shogun’s executioner.  Disgraced by false accusations from the Yagyu clan, he is forced to take the path of the assassin.  Along with his three-year-old son, Daigoro, he seeks revenge on the Yagyu clan and they become known as “Lone Wolf and Cub”. First published in 1970, Lone Wolf and Cub became wildly popular (roughly 8 million copies were sold in Japan) for its epic samurai story, its stark and gruesome depiction of violence during Tokugawa era Japan, its detailed historical accuracy, masterful artwork and nostalgic recollection of the bushido code.

Akira
by Katsuhiro Otomo

A science-fiction tale known primarily as one of the most famous anime in history, Akira was first a well-known landmark manga.  Set in a post-apocalyptic city called Neo-Tokyo, the story follows two teenage friends, Tetsuo and Kaneda, whose lives change forever when paranormal abilities begin to waken in Tetsuo, making him a target for a shadowy agency that will stop at nothing to prevent another catastrophe like the one that leveled Tokyo during World War III.   At the core of the agency’s motivation, is a raw, all-consuming fear of an unthinkable, monstrous power known only as Akira. While many remember Akira for its ultra-violent action sequences and unique pacing (A few seconds of real-time action may take up a full page worth of panels in the manga), at its heart Akira is a masterful character sketch involving themes such as youth alienation, rebellion against government corruption and identity transformation in adolescents.

A Drifting Life
by Yoshihiro Tatsumi

Manga master, Yoshihiro Tatsumi, is widely credited with starting the gekiga style of alternative comics in Japan, in which comics are used to tell gritty, introspective stories about the lives of everyday people.  A Drifting Life is his epic award winning autobiography.  Referring to himself as Hiroshi, Tatsumi begins his story with the surrender of Japan after World War II, when he was 10 years of age, and details the following 15 years of his life.  The manga involves complex family dynamics, Japanese culture and history, the intricacies of the manga industry and, most importantly, what it means to be an artist.

 

 

Coming to Bostock Library in January 2015: The Research Commons

Mon, 03/17/2014 - 14:00

 

Architectural rendering of a planned social lounge space in the Research Commons on the first floor of Bostock Library. Renovations will take place May-November 2014.

To meet the growing needs of interdisciplinary, team-based, and data-driven research at Duke, the Duke University Libraries will transform the first floor of Bostock Library into a new academic service hub equipped with tools and workspaces for digital scholarship, reservable rooms for project teams, and expanded technology and training facilities.

The new space will be known as the “Research Commons” and will officially open in January 2015. The improvements will allow for more technology-focused library services, more spaces for collaborative work, and an attractive new destination for students and faculty in the heart of campus.

The main period of renovation activity will be May – November 2014, in order to minimize disruptions to students and faculty. The $3.5 million project was approved by the Board of Trustees at their October 2013 meeting.

Floor plan of the Research Commons, which will occupy the entire first floor of Bostock Library. Click on the image to see a larger version.

The Research Commons will increase the Libraries’ ability to support interdisciplinary and team-based teaching and learning at Duke, such as the innovative projects emerging from the Bass Connections initiative. The space will bring together the Libraries’ Brandaleone Data and GIS Services Lab (relocated from the second floor of Perkins Library); workshop and presentation space for groups large (45-50) and small (6-8); reservable and drop-in project rooms; and expert library staff assistance, available on-site or by appointment.

“The goal of the Research Commons is to allow individual researchers and project teams to experiment with new ideas and approaches with experts, technology and training available in close proximity,” said Deborah Jakubs, Rita DiGiallonardo Holloway University Librarian and the Vice Provost for Library Affairs. “It will be the kind of space that invites discovery, experimentation, and collaboration.”

Plans for the Research Commons came about through a multi-year planning process in which faculty, students, and library staff explored how Duke researchers are increasingly conducting their work in the context of interdisciplinary collaborations and digital production. Generous funding for the project was made possible through the Duke Forward Campaign.

In order to make room for the renovation, collection materials and furniture on the first floor of Bostock Library will be relocated to other library locations beginning in May. The Libraries will free up additional study space elsewhere in Perkins and Bostock to accommodate students temporarily displaced by the work. A complete list of which collections are moving is available on the Research Commons FAQ page.

Rendering of the Open Lab seating area of the Research Commons.

Also in May, the front entrance of Perkins Library will close due to the Rubenstein Library renovation and remain closed until summer 2015. Library users and visitors will enter the library through the side entrance beneath the Perkins/Bostock connector, or through the von der Heyden Pavilion, which will remain open throughout the renovations. To better accommodate patrons, a Library Service Desk will be placed near the side entrance of Perkins while the front entrance is closed.

More information on the Research Commons, including a renovation timeline and FAQ, can be found on the Libraries’ website at library.duke.edu/research/commons.

Here’s Looking at You, Duke!

Mon, 02/24/2014 - 16:19

Duke: 175 Years of Blue Devilish Images – Student Photography Contest

Duke students are invited to celebrate the 175th anniversary of Duke University’s origins and win cash prizes at the same time!  Explore and emulate the rich images of Duke’s past found in photos from University Archives and then reinterpret them with your own contemporary vision. Categories include Academics, Athletics, Campus Scenes and Social Life.

Sponsored by Lilly Library and Duke University Archives

What you need to know:

  • Who may enter – Currently enrolled Duke Students
  • When – Contest begins Monday, February 24th  and ends Sunday, March 23rd at midnight.
  • Prizes – Winning photographs in each category will receive $200. First runners-up receive $50.
  • Official Contest details and rules, including the entry form

That’s not all!

All contestants are invited to the Awards Ceremony on April 8, 2014 in the Thomas Room in Lilly Library. Winners will be announced and their photographs will be displayed in Lilly Library this spring.

Sponsored by Lilly Library and Duke University Archives.

New Exhibit: Cheap Thrills: The Highs and Lows of Cabaret Culture in Paris, 1880-1939

Tue, 02/18/2014 - 18:50

Cheap Thrills: The Highs and Lows of Cabaret Culture in Paris, 1880-1939, on exhibit February 18 – May 12 in the Perkins Library Gallery.

On exhibit February 18 – May 12, 2014
Perkins Library Gallery, Duke West Campus (Click for map)
Public Hours: Monday-Friday, 8am–7pm; Saturday, 9am–7pm; Sunday, 10am–7pm
Hours may vary on holidays. Please check our posted library hours for more information.

About the Exhibit

A new exhibit in the Perkins Library Gallery  provides a glimpse into the fascinating world of the Parisian cabaret. Starting in the second half of the nineteenth century, the cabaret became a fixture of Parisian culture. Unlike other social institutions of the time, everyone was freely admitted to these venues, so they became a space in which all—regardless of race, color, class, or creed—could freely mingle. Cheap Thrills: The Highs and Lows of Cabaret Culture in Paris, 1880-1939, seeks to shine the spotlight on the wide spectrum of artists who found a home and a stage in the darkened halls of the cabaret.

Illustrated cabaret sheet music from Gil Blas Illustre, a French periodical from the late-19th to early 20th centuries.

Music was, of course, essential to the cabaret. It animated the crowd, roused the performers, and vivified the dancing. In order to capture power of cabaret music, members of the Duke New Music Ensemble composed and recorded songs for the exhibit. Based on historical cabaret tunes, these songs represent a modern take on a classic experience. The graphic and print materials composing the exhibit all come from the collections of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Lilly Library, the Music Library, and Perkins Library.

Related Events and Programs

In addition to the Perkins Library exhibit, there are several related exciting events and programs throughout the spring semester that explore the unique social and cultural significance of the cabaret.

The Nasher Museum of Art is exhibiting a coordinating collection of cabaret material in their Academic Focus Gallery. Be sure to check out Night in the City of Light: Paris’s Cabarets 1881-1914, on exhibit February 15 – June 29, 2014.

In addition to the exhibit, the Nasher Museum will be screening French Cabaret from Stage to Screen on March 22, at 2 p.m. The screening is free and open to the public.

The Duke New Music Ensemble will have two concerts featuring cabaret music. On April 6 at 5 p.m., the Ensemble will be presenting “Melodies and Cacophonies from Paris’s Cabarets” at Fullsteam Brewery in downtown Durham.  Later in the month, on April 13, the Ensemble will be hosting their Spring Concert in Baldwin Auditorium at 8 p.m. featuring selections from cabaret tunes.

Life Is a Cabaret: The Library Party

Last, but certainly not least, the entire Duke community is invited to experience the cabaret first-hand, right in the heart of Perkins Library. The annual Duke Library Party, whose theme this year is “Life Is a Cabaret,” will take place this Friday, February 21, from 9:00 p.m. to 12:00 a.m. The evening will feature appetizers and desserts from Durham Catering; music from the John Brown Band, the Duke New Music Ensemble, and student DJs; and free giveaways to the first 200 guests. Come in your best cabaret or cocktail attire and prepare to dance the night away!

When: Friday, February 21
Time: 9:00 p.m. to Midnight
Where: Perkins Library
Admission: Free
Dress: Cocktail Attire, or Your Best Cabaret Costume

The Library Party is sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Office of the President, SOFC/DSG, George Grody, Markets and Management Studies Department.

The exhibits and programs are sponsored by the Department of Art, Art History and Visual Studies; Department of Music; Department of Romance Studies; Department of Theater Studies; Program in Literature; Program in Women’s Studies; Center for European Studies; Center for French and Francophone Studies; Friends of Duke University Libraries; Duke University Libraries; and the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation.

First Year Library Advisory Board

Fri, 02/07/2014 - 19:30

Members of the First Year Library Advisory Board meet with University Archivists Amy McDonald and Valerie Gillespie

INTRODUCING OUR FIRST-YEAR LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD!

East Campus Libraries are delighted to report that we’ve appointed our 2013-2014 First Year Library Advisory Board. Here’s a list, with some of their thoughts about libraries:

Levi Crews
“The library system at Duke will be an integral part of my university experience; … I value the opportunity to make a difference in a community… I hope that my role on the board will be able to make me and those around me more comfortable with the vast resources Duke provides”.

Yujiao (Catherine) Sun
“The library is the defining key to a community’s cultural atmosphere and development. A university’s library plays an even more critical role because it is the heart of the academic community. … I want to become a member of First Year Library Advisory Board because I want to bring the library closer to my classmates and make the library better for the entire Duke community.”

Katherine M. Zhou
“I’ve always considered a library as a “home away from home.” With a natural curiosity for knowledge, I appreciate a well-maintained library that contains an abundance of literature, is updated with the latest technological systems, and provides a comfortable area to do exactly what Duke is for: to learn. I would like to do my best to provide insight from a student perspective on how to enhance Duke’s libraries”.

Grace Li
“Since I was little, I’ve always loved reading and writing. In the fourth grade, my parents had a meeting with my school librarian, asking how to get me to stop reading (it didn’t work). Libraries have always been a sort of sanctuary for me, because there’s something so beautiful about a place that’s dedicated to books, to education, and to learning. I want to contribute to that, in any way possible”.

Zach Heater
“The thing that makes me most excited about Duke is the potential for original research, and as a humanities guy I know that the roots of original research lie in the astounding array of resources at the libraries. I have always loved spending time at the library, but even more so, I’ve always loved helping people discover how to make the library work for them. …I am very interested in reaching out to freshmen and helping them make the very most of the amazing resources Duke’s libraries are blessed to have”.

Angela Sun
“I appreciate that Duke University involves freshmen through the First-Year Advisory Board. Every freshman is coming to the same new learning environment that is Duke. As freshmen, they can bring new, fresh perspectives to the board. They can identify with their fellow freshmen and help their classmates become better informed and more involved in Duke’s resources and services”.
The first year library advisory board is a coalition of first year students and library coordinators whose mission includes three responsibilities:
• It provides feedback on library initiatives-for example, library renovations and new programs– providing valuable input crucial to the success of a first year gateway library and the policies and decisions of the library with regard to it.
• It represents the first year class and the students’ library related needs during a unique and pivotal year of transition into university culture and its academic expectations.
• It actively searches for ways to improve the library and develops programs to make first year students aware of its resources and services, including those of the wider community and TRLN.

Sick of winter? Need a remedy for cabin fever?

Wed, 01/22/2014 - 20:04

White Ibis Pair: In Tandem

Experience Nature: Up Close and Personal – a Photography Exhibit in Lilly Library

Spring Semester is a misleading term, as it actually begins in January when the cold and barren landscapes of winter abound.

Lilly Library presents an exhibit of photographs to transport you to warmer times and places. Award-winning wildlife and nature photographer Kim Hawks focuses on shore birds, landscapes, and for those who enjoy the beauty of flowers such as those in Duke Gardens, extremely detailed macro plant portraits.

Featured in this exhibit is Turtle Tracks: False Crawl, winner of the 2013 Wildlife in North Carolina Photography Contest (First Place in Animal Behavior Category).

On exhibit January 6 – March 15, 2014
Lilly Library, East Campus (Directions)

Gallery Reception – Meet the Artist
Date: Saturday, February 8, 2014 Time: 3 p.m.
Location: Thomas Room, Lilly Library,East Campus

Lilly Video Spotlight: Action Heroines

Wed, 01/15/2014 - 15:17

Lilly Library has great films featuring action heroines. Go ahead, make her day -
Check out these heroines and their sisters in action in the Lilly Video Spotlight!

La Femme Nikita (1990)

La Femme Nikita (DVD 8982) A cop-killer junkie (Anne Parillaud) is forced by the government to become an undercover assassin or face a life in prison.

Brave (DVD 22979) Princess Merida, an archer and self-reliant young woman, makes a decision which defies custom and brings chaos to her kingdom. To restore her kingdom, she must discover her bravery and inner strength.

Alien (DVD 3311) Terror begins when the crew of a spaceship investigates a transmission from a desolate planet and discovers a life form that is perfectly evolved to annihilate mankind.

Manga Fan? The Duke University Libraries Have You Covered! Part I

Tue, 01/14/2014 - 21:25

Guest post by William Hanley, Library Associate in Electronic Resources and Serials Management, manga expert and fan extraordinaire

Manga: /ˈmaŋgə/
(from the Oxford Dictionary)

Noun:    a style of Japanese comic books and graphic novels, typically aimed at adults as well as children.

Origin:   1950’s: Japanese, from ‘man’ (indiscriminate) + ‘ga’ (picture) (translated as “whimsical drawings” or “impromptu sketches” in modern English)

While manga are enormously popular in Japan and are read by business people, university students and the elderly, as well as children, they have become a global phenomenon.  Many series have themes in academic areas such as psychology, environmental studies, gender roles, world history, cultural studies in general and, of course, Japanese cultural studies in particular.

In the summer of 2013, Lilly Library acquired several manga series of particular merit in these categories.

 

Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind
by Hayao Miyazaki

When it comes to manga and Japanese animation (anime) on a global scale, no name is better known than Hayao Miyazaki.  The film director, animator, manga artist, producer and screenwriter had a career that spanned six decades during which he’s received several awards including an Oscar for his movie, “Spirited Away.”  Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind tells the story of Nausicaä, a princess of a small kingdom on a post-apocalyptic Earth, who becomes involved in a war between kingdoms while an environmental disaster threatens the survival of humankind.  Using her innate empathic bond with the giant Ohmu, insects, and animals of every species, she struggles to bring about a peaceful coexistence among the people of her world, as well as between humanity and nature. It is a tale of humans’ struggle with nature and with each other, as well as the effect war and violence have on society.   The manga is often noted as Miyazaki’s best work.  Mike Crandol of Anime News Network praised the manga stating, “I dare say the manga is [Miyazaki's] finest work ever–animated, printed, or otherwise–and that’s saying a lot.  Manga allows for a depth of plot and character unattainable in the cinematic medium, and Miyazaki uses it to its fullest potential.”  The series is available in the Lilly Library in a deluxe box set containing two hardcover volumes with bonus interior color pages and maps.

 

Hikaru no Go
by Yumi Hotta
Hikaru no Go is a coming of age story written by Yumi Hotta, based around the board game Go.  Although highly fictionalized (the story involves a typical Japanese sixth-grader who finds a best friend in a ghost from Shogunate Japan), the production of the series’ Go games was supervised by Go professional Yukari Umezawa (5-dan).  When added to Hotta’s research on the game, the series gives many accurate glimpses into the culture of modern-day Go.  Since its debut, the manga has been largely responsible for popularizing Go amongst the youth of Japan, China, South Korea, and Taiwan.

 

Full Metal Alchemist
by Hiromu Arakawa

Set in a fictional universe in which alchemy is one of the most advanced scientific techniques, Full Metal Alchemist follows two brothers in their struggle for redemption.  After a disastrous failed attempt to bring their mother back to life through alchemy, Edward and Alphonse Elric search for the Philosopher’s Stone.  It is the only tool that can restore their bodies.  The series explores the concept of equivalent exchange: in order to obtain something new, the person must pay with something of the same value.  Sacrifice is an ongoing theme throughout the story. As one of the best-selling (and possibly the most critically-acclaimed) series in the past 15 years, Full Metal Alchemist is an important pop cultural reference in manga.

5 Centimeters Per Second
by Makoto Shinkai

5 Centimeters Per Second takes its name from the speed at which cherry blossoms – a symbol of transience in Japan – fall from the tree.  This manga adaptation of an anime of the same name portrays a love story where the central conflict is an epiphany: the realization that daily-life can separate people from one another, and that the slow passage of time can gradually deaden the deep feelings they may have for each other.  The work is filled with poignant images that come from two lives intersecting and the hope and disappointment that love brings.

 

Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms
by Fumiyo Kouno

A quote from the back cover of Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms sums up this historical drama quite well.  “What impact did World War II and the dropping of the atomic bomb have on the common people of Japan?  Through the eyes of an average woman living in 1955, Japanese artist Fumiyo Kouno answers these questions.”Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms brings together three short stories dealing with every-day people living in Japan and how the bombing of Hiroshima affected their lives.  With the first story taking place in 1955, the second in 1987, and the third in 2004 the work gives a unique view of how war impacts a country and its people throughout the years.

 

Twin Spica
by Kou Yaginuma

Twin Spica tells the story of a group of Japanese high school students training to become astronauts in the early 21st century after the country’s first human spaceflight launch ended in disaster.  A mixture of coming-of-age, science, and the supernatural genres, the series is a great example of the paramount theme in most manga for young adults and children: never give up in following your dreams.  Additionally, author Kou Yaginuma, makes various references to historical figures and events in space exploration, making the work both heartfelt and technically sound, a perfect blend of teenage melodrama and space science.

 

Genshiken
by Shimoku Kio

Otaku is a Japanese word meaning “a person extremely knowledgeable about the minute details of a particular hobby; specifically one who is obsessed with anime, video games, or computers and rarely leaves home.”  Often used as a derogatory slang term in Japan — oddly enough, many American fans proudly self-identify as Otaku — this is the culture highlighted in Genshiken. Part comedy, part slice-of-life, Genshiken portrays a college club for otaku and the lifestyle its members pursue.  The series gives a surprisingly realistic glimpse into Japanese fandom and includes many excellent references to manga, anime, video games and other aspects of otaku culture such as cosplay, fan conventions, model building and figurines.

 

Save the Date! “Life Is a Cabaret” Library Party: Feb. 21

Fri, 01/10/2014 - 19:45

The Library Party is a unique Duke tradition. For one night only, Perkins and Bostock Libraries throw open their doors for a night of music, food, and un-shushed entertainment. The event is free and open to the entire Duke community.

After a year on hiatus as we prepared for the Rubenstein Library renovation, the Library Party is back! Once again, the Libraries are partnering with the Duke Marketing Club to organize this year’s event. The theme—“Life is a Cabaret”—is inspired by an upcoming exhibit on 19th- and early-20th-century Parisian cabarets that will be on display in the Perkins Gallery February–May, with a companion exhibit at the Nasher Museum’s Academic Focus Gallery.

Life Is a Cabaret will feature live music, costumes, decorations, food and beverages, and plenty of joie de vivre!

When: Friday, February 21
Time: 9 PM to Midnight
Where: Perkins Library
Admission: Free
Dress: Cocktail Attire, or Your Best Cabaret Costume

Students: Never been to a Library Party? Check out these images, videos, and recaps from our Heroes and Villains Library Party in 2012 and the Mad Men and Mad Women Library Party in 2011.

Many thanks to the Office of the President, Office of the Provost, Duke Student Government/SOFC, George Grody, and the Markets and Management Studies Department for sponsoring this event.

Stay tuned for more updates!

 

Illustration of cabaret girls by Albert Guillaume from Gil Blas, a Parisian literary periodical published 1879-1914.

About the Exhibit

Cheap Thrills: The Highs and Lows of Cabaret Culture in Paris, 1880-1939

On display in the Perkins Library Gallery, February 18 – May 12

This upcoming exhibit offers a whirlwind tour of Montmartre’s famed late-19th-century musical revues—the Chat Noir, Folies Bergère, and Moulin Rouge—which boasted such chanteuses as Yvette Guilbert and Josephine Baker. Cheap Thrills highlights the Libraries’ extensive collection of cabaret-related materials, including biographies, guidebooks, periodicals, and musical scores. The exhibit will be sonified, with recreated performances of the cabarets’ raucous ballads and rallying performances, all arranged and recorded by the Duke New Music Ensemble.

Companion Exhibit:
Night in the City of Light: Paris’s Cabarets, 1881-1914

On display in the Nasher Museum of Art’s Academic Focus Gallery, February 15 – June 29

Related Performances and Screenings

Saturday, March 22 (2-4:45 pm): Film Screenings and Discussion: “French Cabaret from Stage to Screen,” Nasher Museum of Art

Sunday, April 6 (5 pm): Duke New Music Ensemble [dnme] presents “Melodies and Cacophonies from Paris’s Cabarets,” Fullsteam Brewery, Durham

Sunday, April 13 (8 pm): Duke New Music Ensemble [dnme] Spring Concert with selections of cabaret melodies to coincide with the exhibitions “Night in the City of Light: Paris’s Cabarets, 1881-1914″ and “Cheap Thrills: The Highs and Lows of Cabaret Culture in Paris, 1881-1939,” Baldwin Auditorium, Duke East Campus

New York Times Academic Pass

Mon, 01/06/2014 - 18:22

With your Duke email address, you can get free access to NYTimes.com and the NYTimes apps.

You asked for web access, and The New York Times delivered: meet the NYTimes.com Academic Pass. You can now access articles for free on the New York Times website on any device, from any location with your Duke email address.

To get started:

  1. Visit nytimes.com/pass
  2. Click on “Register” to create an account with your Duke email address
  3. Click “Continue,” and check your Duke email account for a confirmation email (it may take up to 15 minutes to arrive)
  4. Click on the link in the email for your 24-hour access pass
  5. For each additional pass, go to nytimes.com/pass and log in again

Questions? Contact the Perkins Research Desk at askref@duke.edu or 660-5880.