Music Library blog posts

Rubenstein Library Renovation Update: Feb. 17-28

Mon, 02/17/2014 - 11:00

A new foundation, stone cleaning, and more progress—despite the winter weather

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Duke to Host Scholarly Communication Institute

Mon, 02/17/2014 - 11:00

After a decade at UVA, Mellon-funded initiative moves to the Research Triangle

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Book Talk and Signing with Judy Juanita, Feb. 19

Fri, 02/14/2014 - 20:45

Date: Wednesday, February 19
Time: 5:00 – 7:00 p.m. (reception starts at 5:00)
Location: Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture, Flowers Building (Click for Map)
Contact: John Gartrell, Director, Franklin Research Center, 919-660-5922, john.gartrell@duke.edu

Poet, playwright, and activist Judy Juanita joins us to discuss her first novel, Virgin Soul. Virgin Soul tells the story of Geneice, a young college student in 1960s San Francisco balancing school and activism when she joins the burgeoning Black Panther Party during its formative years.

This event is part II of the “Women in the Movement” series hosted by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture for 2013/14. The event is co-sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies, Program in Women’s Studies, Department of African & African American Studies, Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture, Franklin Humanities Institute, and Center for African and African American Research.

Free and open to the public.

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Happy Valentine’s Day, My Rapturous Codfish!

Fri, 02/14/2014 - 12:41

And other terms of endearment from an unexpected master of the form

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Duke to Host Scholarly Communication Institute

Wed, 02/12/2014 - 15:05

The Triangle Scholarly Communication Institute invites proposals from groups interested in participating in a series of seminars, discussions, presentations, and workshops, to be held over four days in Chapel Hill, NC, in November 2014.

DURHAM, N.C. – The Duke University Libraries have received a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support an annual Scholarly Communication Institute with the goal of advancing scholarship, teaching, and publishing in the humanities through the application of digital technologies.

Over the last two decades, rapid technological changes have fundamentally altered the way in which research and other scholarly writings are created, evaluated for quality, disseminated to the scholarly community, and preserved for future use. There has been lively debate among scholars, librarians, publishers, and technologists about the ways in which scholars share their research within the academic community and beyond. Duke has long been a vocal participant in these discussions and a strong advocate for the knowledge-sharing mission of research universities.

The Scholarly Communication Institute (SCI) began as a Mellon-funded initiative at the University of Virginia in 2003 and was based there for nine years. Duke will host the new SCI, working in close collaboration with partners at the University North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, North Carolina Central University, and the Triangle Research Libraries Network.

Like its predecessor program at UVA, the Triangle SCI will bring together a broad range of experts from inside and outside academia to discuss needs and opportunities in the domain of scholarly communications. The emphasis will be on productive dialogue across boundaries that often separate academic communities with an ultimate goal of fostering new types of collaboration and new models of scholarly dissemination.

“The goal of the SCI is not to schedule breakthroughs, but to create conditions that favor them,” said Deborah Jakubs, Rita DiGiallonardo Holloway University Librarian and Vice Provost for Library Affairs at Duke.

“It will bring diverse groups together and provide a combination of structured and unstructured time to brainstorm, organize, and jump-start ideas, to experiment and solve problems, and even begin to build,” she said. “This will be an opportunity both to talk and to do.”

Each annual institute will be organized under a broad theme. This year’s is “Scholarship and the Crowd.” It will be held November 9-13 at the Rizzo Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Participants will be selected through a competitive proposal process. For the 2014 institute, applicants from the Triangle area are especially encouraged to submit. Proposals are being accepted through March 24. More information and application instructions are available at the institute’s website: trianglesci.org.

 

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Love in the Library: True Tales of Romance by the Book

Wed, 02/12/2014 - 12:30

In Duke’s temple of knowledge, more than just facts and fiction await the receptive soul

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New Student Wall Exhibition!

Wed, 02/12/2014 - 04:16

Guest Blogger: Rebecca Evans, Graduate Student and Instructor, English Department, Duke University

My English 90 class, “Unnatural Nature: Literature and Ecology,” was intended to be an introduction not just to ecocriticism (the study of literature and the environment), but also to the environmental humanities, in which literature, history, philosophy, and art are considered together. Accordingly, even as my students read widely in environmental literature, they also learned about environmental art in various media, from paintings and photographs to music and film to land art and living sculptures. As the semester drew to a close, students were asked to shift from a critical mode to a creative one: after spending months learning about how cultural artifacts commented on and interacted with environmentalism, they had to themselves create a piece of environmental art, which (at their request) would be displayed in Perkins.

I developed this assignment in the hope that it would let students explore the themes that had struck them over the course of the semester in new ways. The final project was creative and open-ended, but it was nonetheless rigorous, and I warned them that the project would undoubtedly prove more difficult than they expected: they were held to high standards in the project itself, in their preparatory research, and in their critical introductions to their own work. I was impressed by the energetic dedication with which they approached the task, and by the diversity of materials that the class ultimately produced. As I worked with students to refine their projects and to maximize the visual effectiveness of the components they chose for display, I found myself learning a great deal and becoming even more excited about working in such a vibrant field as the environmental humanities.

Thanks are due to Meg Brown, who expertly tutored us on the process of creating a coherent and compelling exhibition; to Michael Daul, for helping to create our online exhibit; to Patrick Dougherty, whose guest lecture informed the class about the broader world of environmental art; and, of course, to the students of “Unnatural Nature,” who made this experience rewarding and memorable.

The exhibit is on display on the Student Wall in Perkins Library during the month of February or visit the exhibit online-including a student created documentary AND student performed and written rap!

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Hundreds of NC Oral Histories Digitized

Tue, 02/11/2014 - 03:42

North Carolina interviews expand collection of oral histories about the Jim Crow South

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The Mystery of Jefferson Davis’s Hair

Tue, 02/11/2014 - 03:34

Why do we have “giant clumps” of the Confederate President’s locks in the archives?

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First Year Library

Fri, 02/07/2014 - 19:30

Members of the First Year Library Advisory Board meet with University Archivists Amy McDonald and Valerie Gillespie

INTRODUCING OUR FIRST-YEAR LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD!

East Campus Libraries are delighted to report that we’ve appointed our 2013-2014 First Year Library Advisory Board. Here’s a list, with some of their thoughts about libraries:

Levi Crews
“The library system at Duke will be an integral part of my university experience; … I value the opportunity to make a difference in a community… I hope that my role on the board will be able to make me and those around me more comfortable with the vast resources Duke provides”.

Yujiao (Catherine) Sun
“The library is the defining key to a community’s cultural atmosphere and development. A university’s library plays an even more critical role because it is the heart of the academic community. … I want to become a member of First Year Library Advisory Board because I want to bring the library closer to my classmates and make the library better for the entire Duke community.”

Katherine M. Zhou
“I’ve always considered a library as a “home away from home.” With a natural curiosity for knowledge, I appreciate a well-maintained library that contains an abundance of literature, is updated with the latest technological systems, and provides a comfortable area to do exactly what Duke is for: to learn. I would like to do my best to provide insight from a student perspective on how to enhance Duke’s libraries”.

Grace Li
“Since I was little, I’ve always loved reading and writing. In the fourth grade, my parents had a meeting with my school librarian, asking how to get me to stop reading (it didn’t work). Libraries have always been a sort of sanctuary for me, because there’s something so beautiful about a place that’s dedicated to books, to education, and to learning. I want to contribute to that, in any way possible”.

Zach Heater
“The thing that makes me most excited about Duke is the potential for original research, and as a humanities guy I know that the roots of original research lie in the astounding array of resources at the libraries. I have always loved spending time at the library, but even more so, I’ve always loved helping people discover how to make the library work for them. …I am very interested in reaching out to freshmen and helping them make the very most of the amazing resources Duke’s libraries are blessed to have”.

Angela Sun
“I appreciate that Duke University involves freshmen through the First-Year Advisory Board. Every freshman is coming to the same new learning environment that is Duke. As freshmen, they can bring new, fresh perspectives to the board. They can identify with their fellow freshmen and help their classmates become better informed and more involved in Duke’s resources and services”.
The first year library advisory board is a coalition of first year students and library coordinators whose mission includes three responsibilities:
• It provides feedback on library initiatives-for example, library renovations and new programs– providing valuable input crucial to the success of a first year gateway library and the policies and decisions of the library with regard to it.
• It represents the first year class and the students’ library related needs during a unique and pivotal year of transition into university culture and its academic expectations.
• It actively searches for ways to improve the library and develops programs to make first year students aware of its resources and services, including those of the wider community and TRLN.

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Bingham Center Director Receives Career Achievement Award

Fri, 02/07/2014 - 13:00

Laura Micham recognized for long-standing contributions to women’s studies in librarianship

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Doing Digital Humanities: New Workshops This Spring

Wed, 02/05/2014 - 21:36

Panels, presentations to focus on pedagogy and tools for teaching with digital humanities

The post Doing Digital Humanities: New Workshops This Spring appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Trent Room Becomes the Richmond House Room

Tue, 02/04/2014 - 17:48

The Medical Center Library’s historic wood-paneled room gets a new name

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Fear and Loathing in Page Auditorium

Fri, 01/31/2014 - 15:32

A look back at gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson’s memorable visit to Duke

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Good Questions: How to Track Down a Top-Secret Letter

Thu, 01/30/2014 - 17:09

A new series on the most interesting questions we get asked, and how we answered them

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Good Questions: How to Track Down a Top-Secret Letter

Thu, 01/30/2014 - 13:00

The declassified “top secret” letter sent by Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir to U.S. President Richard Nixon (via several intermediaries) in October 1973. Click on the image to see the full document on the National Security Archive website.

The questions we get in Perkins Research Services range from the fatuous to the far-fetched to the fascinating. This is the first of a series on our most interesting research questions, and how we go about answering them.

In this age of Edward Snowden’s NSA leaks and Julian Assange’s WikiLeaks, a lot of current U.S. classified information is in the news and floating around on the web, should you choose to seek it out. But how do you find top-secret communications between world leaders from the past? This was the question I received via IM recently.

According to several articles, in October 1973 Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir sent an urgent letter to President Richard Nixon via Henry Kissinger. The researcher (let’s call her Mary) had already checked many primary sources, databases, and yes, even Google. But she could not locate the original letter. Only quoted fragments of the declassified document could be found.

Rule #1 of library detective work: Go with your gut (especially if it’s an experienced gut). If you think it should be found in the National Security Archive database and Mary didn’t find it there—look again, trying other search strategies. So I did.

No luck there. This question obviously would take more persistence as well as intestinal fortitude. I checked the print Foreign Relations of the U.S. and other sources in the Reference area then redoubled my efforts. (For those with less research experience in this area, there are clues in the library’s guide to International & Transnational Relations.)

In true government document fashion, my search results often had obscure titles that made it difficult to know if I had hit pay dirt. With a combination of persistence, collaboration, educated guessing, and serendipity….

BINGO! Document 7 in a search of the National Security Archive website through GWU was described thus: “Deputy Assistant to the President for National Security Brent Scowcroft to Kissinger, 5 October 1973, enclosing message from Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir (passed through Israeli chargé Shalev).” The murky type on the cover page said “Top Secret/Exclusively Eyes Only.” Coo-oo-uhl. Once I deciphered the trail of all the people through whom it was transmitted, it became clear that the next page was Meir’s own message. I IM’d Mary, who excitedly confirmed this by matching some of the quotes she had found.

Although we found our answer on the free web after all, it took a library to index and share the document and librarian intervention to track it down. You might call us everyone’s favorite “intelligence agency,” mining and exposing information for the common good.

Post by Catherine Shreve, Librarian for Public Policy & Political Science

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New MOOC Specialization: Reasoning, Data Analysis, and Writing

Wed, 01/29/2014 - 18:11

Duke launches new multi-series course track on Coursera

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What’s In the Lab? Duke & Sons Tobacco Album

Wed, 01/29/2014 - 17:59

Historical scrapbook of tobacco collectors cards poses conservation challenges

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The Writing in the Wall: An Interesting Renovation Discovery

Sun, 01/26/2014 - 18:00

The library’s old pneumatic tube system reveals some hidden surprises

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Bound Images: Maps in Books, Jan. 30

Fri, 01/24/2014 - 15:38

Join the BorderWork(s) Lab for a discussion of historical cartography and printing, 1500-1850

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