Music Library blog posts

Demystifying Data & GIS Services

Thu, 01/23/2014 - 20:41

Need help finding, processing, mapping, or visualizing data? We can do that!

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Sick of winter? Need a remedy for cabin fever?

Wed, 01/22/2014 - 20:04

White Ibis Pair: In Tandem

Experience Nature: Up Close and Personal – a Photography Exhibit in Lilly Library

Spring Semester is a misleading term, as it actually begins in January when the cold and barren landscapes of winter abound.

Lilly Library presents an exhibit of photographs to transport you to warmer times and places. Award-winning wildlife and nature photographer Kim Hawks focuses on shore birds, landscapes, and for those who enjoy the beauty of flowers such as those in Duke Gardens, extremely detailed macro plant portraits.

Featured in this exhibit is Turtle Tracks: False Crawl, winner of the 2013 Wildlife in North Carolina Photography Contest (First Place in Animal Behavior Category).

On exhibit January 6 – March 15, 2014
Lilly Library, East Campus (Directions)

Gallery Reception – Meet the Artist
Date: Saturday, February 8, 2014 Time: 3 p.m.
Location: Thomas Room, Lilly Library,East Campus

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Unveiling the Haitian Declaration of Independence

Wed, 01/22/2014 - 17:38

Students, faculty, and librarians celebrate the “birth certificate” of a country

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Cabaret Couture: What to Wear to the Library Party?

Tue, 01/21/2014 - 18:26

We put together a few suggestions to inspire your inner Parisian

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Conservation Lab’s 1091 Project: Looking Ahead to 2014

Tue, 01/21/2014 - 18:12

The conservation labs at Duke and Iowa State compare notes on what’s in store this year

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Cabaret Couture

Tue, 01/21/2014 - 18:06

Composite photograph of cabaret star Josephine Baker and the cast of “Plantation Days,” a 1923 musical revue by African American jazz pianist James P. Johnson. Parisian cabarets featured comedians, clowns, acrobats, and a variety of other entertainments. But singers and dancers always attracted the largest crowds.

As you might have heard, the Duke Library Party has been resurrected after a one-year hiatus, thanks to the help of the Duke Marketing Club. The date: February 21, 2014. The theme: “Life Is a Cabaret.” Party-goers will be invited to enjoy a rollicking nightlife scene right out of late 19th- and early 20th-century Paris, in what was only hours earlier just another room in Perkins Library. Of course, one must always be fashionably attired when attending such soirées, so we have put together a gallery of cabaret fashions to inspire your inner Parisian of the Belle Époque.

But first, a note on the phenomenon of the cabaret itself. Cabarets took Parisian culture by storm. Until 1867, song lyrics and theatrical performances were carefully censored and regulated in France. By the 1880s, these restrictions had relaxed, and a freer, more risqué form of entertainment began to flourish in the bohemian, working-class neighborhood of Montmartre. Legendary cabarets like the Moulin Rouge, the Chat Noir, and the Mirliton were filled with comedians, clowns, acrobats, and—most importantly—singers and dancers. The songs were bold and bawdy, the dancing suggestive, and audiences adored it.

The historical, artistic, and cultural impact of cabaret life will be the subject of an upcoming library exhibit—Cheap Thrills: The Highs and Lows of Paris’s Cabaret Culture, 1880-1939—which will go on display in the Perkins Library Gallery on February 19 and run through May. The exhibit will highlight the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library’s extensive collection of cabaret-related materials, including biographies, guidebooks, periodicals, and musical scores.

Now back to the fashion show.

 

One of the more ladylike ensembles, this particular dress worn by cabaret star and American dancer Isadora Duncan would have you floating through the crowd this February.

For a more scandalous look, this illustration from Gil Blas is classic cabaret, right down to the black stockings and abundant use of tassels. (Don’t forget the fan!) Gentlemen: note the top hats, high collars, and ubiquitous mustaches.

Prepare to dance the night away, just like this lovely lady in a flouncy, frilled frock.

Though we can’t recommend this particular ensemble (the Library Party is a respectable event, and banana leaves are hard to come by in February anyway), Josephine Baker’s iconic “banana girdle” outfit is one of the most famous examples of cabaret style.

So there are a few ideas to inspire you, with more to come. Start assembling your bejeweled, ruffled, bohemian, mustachioed wardrobe and get ready to party in the City of Light!

(With the exception of the composite photo at top, all images are taken from two French publications of the time: Gil Blas, a Parisian literary periodical, and Le Mirliton, a weekly newsletter published by the famous cabaret of the same name. All come from the collections of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.)

 

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Manga Fan? We’ve Got You Covered

Thu, 01/16/2014 - 15:59

Check out some of these recently acquired series in Lilly Library

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Honoring the Legacy of Nelson Mandela (1918-2013)

Wed, 01/15/2014 - 21:18

 

A photographic exhibit in Perkins Library documents the life of Nelson Mandela as taken by his personal photographer Benny Gool. The images were selected from a historic exhibition that took place at Pop International Galleries in New York in February 2013. The prints were made available for this memorial display with the generous help of Todd Ruppert, a member of the Duke University Libraries Advisory Board, and IconsPhotos the representative of the archive. The images cover historic events, major celebrities and world figures, and the endearing charm and connection that Mandela had to the people of South Africa and the world. All photos are available for purchase. Visit http://www.iconsphotos.com/for more information about the original exhibition.

The exhibit will be on display on the Campus Club Exhibit Wall (located near the Bostock corridor entrance) in Perkins Library until February 14, 2014.

 

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New Books by Duke Faculty: Winter 2013-14

Wed, 01/15/2014 - 18:00

Check out new scholarship and fiction from Duke faculty and staff members

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Lilly Video Spotlight: Action Heroines

Wed, 01/15/2014 - 15:17

Lilly Library has great films featuring action heroines. Go ahead, make her day -
Check out these heroines and their sisters in action in the Lilly Video Spotlight!

La Femme Nikita (1990)

La Femme Nikita (DVD 8982) A cop-killer junkie (Anne Parillaud) is forced by the government to become an undercover assassin or face a life in prison.

Brave (DVD 22979) Princess Merida, an archer and self-reliant young woman, makes a decision which defies custom and brings chaos to her kingdom. To restore her kingdom, she must discover her bravery and inner strength.

Alien (DVD 3311) Terror begins when the crew of a spaceship investigates a transmission from a desolate planet and discovers a life form that is perfectly evolved to annihilate mankind.

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Manga Fan? The Duke University Libraries Have You Covered! Part I

Tue, 01/14/2014 - 21:25

Guest post by William Hanley, Library Associate in Electronic Resources and Serials Management, manga expert and fan extraordinaire

Manga: /ˈmaŋgə/
(from the Oxford Dictionary)

Noun:    a style of Japanese comic books and graphic novels, typically aimed at adults as well as children.

Origin:   1950’s: Japanese, from ‘man’ (indiscriminate) + ‘ga’ (picture) (translated as “whimsical drawings” or “impromptu sketches” in modern English)

While manga are enormously popular in Japan and are read by business people, university students and the elderly, as well as children, they have become a global phenomenon.  Many series have themes in academic areas such as psychology, environmental studies, gender roles, world history, cultural studies in general and, of course, Japanese cultural studies in particular.

In the summer of 2013, Lilly Library acquired several manga series of particular merit in these categories.

 

Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind
by Hayao Miyazaki

When it comes to manga and Japanese animation (anime) on a global scale, no name is better known than Hayao Miyazaki.  The film director, animator, manga artist, producer and screenwriter had a career that spanned six decades during which he’s received several awards including an Oscar for his movie, “Spirited Away.”  Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind tells the story of Nausicaä, a princess of a small kingdom on a post-apocalyptic Earth, who becomes involved in a war between kingdoms while an environmental disaster threatens the survival of humankind.  Using her innate empathic bond with the giant Ohmu, insects, and animals of every species, she struggles to bring about a peaceful coexistence among the people of her world, as well as between humanity and nature. It is a tale of humans’ struggle with nature and with each other, as well as the effect war and violence have on society.   The manga is often noted as Miyazaki’s best work.  Mike Crandol of Anime News Network praised the manga stating, “I dare say the manga is [Miyazaki's] finest work ever–animated, printed, or otherwise–and that’s saying a lot.  Manga allows for a depth of plot and character unattainable in the cinematic medium, and Miyazaki uses it to its fullest potential.”  The series is available in the Lilly Library in a deluxe box set containing two hardcover volumes with bonus interior color pages and maps.

 

Hikaru no Go
by Yumi Hotta
Hikaru no Go is a coming of age story written by Yumi Hotta, based around the board game Go.  Although highly fictionalized (the story involves a typical Japanese sixth-grader who finds a best friend in a ghost from Shogunate Japan), the production of the series’ Go games was supervised by Go professional Yukari Umezawa (5-dan).  When added to Hotta’s research on the game, the series gives many accurate glimpses into the culture of modern-day Go.  Since its debut, the manga has been largely responsible for popularizing Go amongst the youth of Japan, China, South Korea, and Taiwan.

 

Full Metal Alchemist
by Hiromu Arakawa

Set in a fictional universe in which alchemy is one of the most advanced scientific techniques, Full Metal Alchemist follows two brothers in their struggle for redemption.  After a disastrous failed attempt to bring their mother back to life through alchemy, Edward and Alphonse Elric search for the Philosopher’s Stone.  It is the only tool that can restore their bodies.  The series explores the concept of equivalent exchange: in order to obtain something new, the person must pay with something of the same value.  Sacrifice is an ongoing theme throughout the story. As one of the best-selling (and possibly the most critically-acclaimed) series in the past 15 years, Full Metal Alchemist is an important pop cultural reference in manga.

5 Centimeters Per Second
by Makoto Shinkai

5 Centimeters Per Second takes its name from the speed at which cherry blossoms – a symbol of transience in Japan – fall from the tree.  This manga adaptation of an anime of the same name portrays a love story where the central conflict is an epiphany: the realization that daily-life can separate people from one another, and that the slow passage of time can gradually deaden the deep feelings they may have for each other.  The work is filled with poignant images that come from two lives intersecting and the hope and disappointment that love brings.

 

Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms
by Fumiyo Kouno

A quote from the back cover of Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms sums up this historical drama quite well.  “What impact did World War II and the dropping of the atomic bomb have on the common people of Japan?  Through the eyes of an average woman living in 1955, Japanese artist Fumiyo Kouno answers these questions.”Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms brings together three short stories dealing with every-day people living in Japan and how the bombing of Hiroshima affected their lives.  With the first story taking place in 1955, the second in 1987, and the third in 2004 the work gives a unique view of how war impacts a country and its people throughout the years.

 

Twin Spica
by Kou Yaginuma

Twin Spica tells the story of a group of Japanese high school students training to become astronauts in the early 21st century after the country’s first human spaceflight launch ended in disaster.  A mixture of coming-of-age, science, and the supernatural genres, the series is a great example of the paramount theme in most manga for young adults and children: never give up in following your dreams.  Additionally, author Kou Yaginuma, makes various references to historical figures and events in space exploration, making the work both heartfelt and technically sound, a perfect blend of teenage melodrama and space science.

 

Genshiken
by Shimoku Kio

Otaku is a Japanese word meaning “a person extremely knowledgeable about the minute details of a particular hobby; specifically one who is obsessed with anime, video games, or computers and rarely leaves home.”  Often used as a derogatory slang term in Japan — oddly enough, many American fans proudly self-identify as Otaku — this is the culture highlighted in Genshiken. Part comedy, part slice-of-life, Genshiken portrays a college club for otaku and the lifestyle its members pursue.  The series gives a surprisingly realistic glimpse into Japanese fandom and includes many excellent references to manga, anime, video games and other aspects of otaku culture such as cosplay, fan conventions, model building and figurines.

 

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Unveiling the Haitian Declaration of Independence: Jan. 21

Tue, 01/14/2014 - 18:27

Help us celebrate the acquisition of this rare and important piece of world history

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Welcome to Our Redesigned Library Website!

Mon, 01/13/2014 - 15:12

Check out the new look and feel, and let us know what you think

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Save the Date! Library Party: Feb. 21

Fri, 01/10/2014 - 19:55

The Library Party is back, and it’s going to be (Belle) Epoque

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Save the Date! “Life Is a Cabaret” Library Party: Feb. 21

Fri, 01/10/2014 - 19:45

The Library Party is a unique Duke tradition. For one night only, Perkins and Bostock Libraries throw open their doors for a night of music, food, and un-shushed entertainment. The event is free and open to the entire Duke community.

After a year on hiatus as we prepared for the Rubenstein Library renovation, the Library Party is back! Once again, the Libraries are partnering with the Duke Marketing Club to organize this year’s event. The theme—“Life is a Cabaret”—is inspired by an upcoming exhibit on 19th- and early-20th-century Parisian cabarets that will be on display in the Perkins Gallery February–May, with a companion exhibit at the Nasher Museum.

Life Is a Cabaret will feature live music, costumes, decorations, food and beverages, and plenty of joi de vivre!

When: Friday, February 21
Time: 9 PM to Midnight
Where: Perkins Library
Admission: Free
Dress: Cocktail Attire, or Your Best Period-Appropriate Ensemble

Students: Never been to a Library Party? Check out these images, videos, and recaps from our Heroes and Villains Library Party in 2012 and the Mad Men and Mad Women Library Party in 2011.

Many thanks to the Office of the President and the Office of the Provost for sponsoring this event.

Stay tuned for more updates!

 

Illustration of cabaret girls by Albert Guillaume from Gil Blas, a Parisian literary periodical published 1879-1914.

About the Exhibit

Cheap Thrills: The Highs and Lows of Paris’s Cabarets, 1880-1939

On display in the Perkins Library Gallery, February 19 – May 12

This upcoming exhibit offers a whirlwind tour of Montmartre’s famed late-19th-century musical revues—the Chat Noir, Folies Bergère, and Moulin Rouge—which boasted such chanteuses as Yvette Guilbert and Josephine Baker. Cheap Thrills highlights the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library’s extensive collection of cabaret-related materials, including biographies, guidebooks, periodicals, and musical scores. The exhibit will be sonified, with recreated performances of the cabarets’ raucous ballads and rallying performances, all arranged and recorded by the Duke New Music Ensemble.

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Rubenstein Library Renovation Update: Jan. 10-24

Fri, 01/10/2014 - 19:16

The renovation enters a new phase, as demolition winds down and construction begins

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New York Times Academic Pass

Mon, 01/06/2014 - 18:24

Use your Duke email address to get free access to the New York Times on any device

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New York Times Academic Pass

Mon, 01/06/2014 - 18:22

With your Duke email address, you can get free access to NYTimes.com and the NYTimes apps.

You asked for web access, and The New York Times delivered: meet the NYTimes.com Academic Pass. You can now access articles for free on the New York Times website on any device, from any location with your Duke email address.

To get started:

  1. Visit nytimes.com/pass
  2. Click on “Register” to create an account with your Duke email address
  3. Click “Continue,” and check your Duke email account for a confirmation email (it may take up to 15 minutes to arrive)
  4. Click on the link in the email for your 24-hour access pass
  5. For each additional pass, go to nytimes.com/pass and log in again

Questions? Contact the Perkins Research Desk at askref@duke.edu or 660-5880.

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What Could Have Entered the Public Domain (But Didn’t)

Mon, 01/06/2014 - 18:16

Kevin Smith examines what did, didn’t, and should have entered the public domain on Jan. 1, 2014

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Duke MOOCs Year in Review

Mon, 01/06/2014 - 18:14

What the numbers tell us about Duke’s massive open online course offerings in 2013

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