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Faculty Bookwatch features J. Kameron Carter

The Franklin Humanities Institute & the Duke University Libraries are pleased to present a panel discussion of Race: A Theological Account by J. Kameron Carter, Associate Professor of Theology & Black Church Studies, Duke Divinity School. Professor Carter will respond to comments on his book by a panel of Duke faculty: Elizabeth Clark, John Carlisle Kilgo Professor of Religion; Mary McClintock Fulkerson, Professor of Theology; Kenneth Surin, Professor and Chair, Program in Literature; and Maurice Wallace, Associate Professor of English and African & African American Studies.  The program, which is open to everyone, is part of the Faculty Bookwatch series.

Wednesday, 4 February 2009, 4:30pm, Perkins Library Biddle Rare Book Room. Book sale and reception following the program

ABOUT THE FEATURED BOOK & AUTHOR
In Race: A Theological Account, J. Kameron Carter meditates on the multiple legacies implicated in the production of a racialized world and that still mark how we function in it and think about ourselves. These are the legacies of colonialism and empire, political theories of the state, anthropological theories of the human, and philosophy itself, from the eighteenth-century Enlightenment to the present.

Professor Carter teaches courses in both theology and black church studies. His academic interests range from systematic theology and theological exegesis to philosophy, literature, and cultural studies. He draws significantly on patristic and medieval approaches to theology in engaging the contemporary theological and cultural imagination. He is pursuing research towards a new work tentatively titled "Religion and the Black Intellectual Imagination" and is engaged in a long-term research project which will yield a dogmatic Christology for the 21st century.

ABOUT FACULTY BOOKWATCH
Faculty Bookwatch is a series intended to celebrate and to encourage scholarly conversations on important recent books by Duke faculty in the humanities and interpretive social sciences. Each program consists of a panel discussion on the book with speakers representing different fields and disciplines, with additional remarks by the featured author. 


 

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Posted 28 January 2009
 

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Last modified January 28, 2009 9:57:14 AM EST