Rights! Camera! Action! Film Screening: 'Fire at Sea / Fuocoammare' (2016)

Rubenstein Library Events - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 23:00
Other (see event description)East Campus

Join the Rubenstein Library's Human Rights Archive and the Duke Human Rights Center @FHI for a special film screening, photo exhibition, and post-film discussion.

The first documentary to ever win the top award at the Berlin International Film Festival, Fire at Sea takes place in Lampedusa, a once peaceful Mediterranean island that has become a major entry point for African refugees into Europe. There, we meet Samuele, a 12-year-old boy who lives simply, climbing rocks by the shore and playing with his slingshot. Yet nearby we also witness thousands of men, women, and children trying to survive the crossing from Africa in boats that are too small for such a journey. Filmmaker Gianfranco Rose masterfully places these realities side by side, and in so doing creates a remarkable third narrative that jolts us into a new understanding of what is really happening in the Mediterranean today.

The screening will be accompanied by an exhibit of works by photographer Darrin Zammit Lupi, who will participate in a post-screening discussion.

Free and open to the public.

 

Location: Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse

 

More about Fire at Sea:

"‘Fire at Sea’ Is Not the Documentary You’d Expect About the Migrant Crisis. It’s Better." (New York Times)

 

For more information, contact:

Patrick Stawski, Human Rights Archivist

 

Currents of Change: Migration, Transit and Outcomes in the Mediterranean

Rubenstein Library Events - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 16:00
Rubenstein 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)West Campus

Join the Human Rights Archive and the Forum for Scholars and Publics for a dialogue and critical examination of the history of recent immigration in the Mediterranean and its impact on individual, local, and global migration politics, policy, and culture.

Our key guest will be Malta-based Darrin Zammit Lupi, an internationally respected and award-winning photojournalist and humanitarian who has been participating in and documenting sea migration in the Mediterranean region for over ten years.

Zammit Lupi will be joined by Niels Frenzen, faculty at USC Gould School of Law and an advocate since the 1980s both for migrants crossing the Caribbean and the Mediterranean, and Holly Ackerman, Duke Librarian and scholar on sea migration.

 

Co-sponsored by the Forum for Scholars and Publics, Duke Human Rights Center @ FHI, and the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

 

More about the Darrin Zammit Lupi:

www.darrinzammitlupi.com

 

For more information, contact:

Patrick Stawski, Human Rights Archivist

 

Two bestiaries

Baskin Collection Additions - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 00:00

Author: Angel, Marie, illustrator.
Published: [Cambridge, Massachusetts] : Harvard College Library, [1964?]

Currently held at: DUKE

History of the Associated Country Women of the World and of its member societies 1929-1953

Baskin Collection Additions - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 00:00

Author: Scarborough, Neve, author.
Published: London : [Publisher not identified], 1953.

Currently held at: DUKE

The pioneer policewoman

Baskin Collection Additions - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 00:00

Author: Allen, Mary S. (Mary Sophia), author.
Published: London : Chatto & Windus, 1925.

Currently held at: DUKE

Our girls in wartime

Baskin Collection Additions - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 00:00

Author: Gordon, Hampden, author.
Published: London : John Lane, the Bodley Head ; New York : John Lane Company ; Toronto : S.B. Gundy, [1917]

Currently held at: DUKE

The story of the Sargent Industrial School at Beacon, New York, 1891-1916 : told by Sarah Louise Arnold, dean of Simmons College, Boston.

Baskin Collection Additions - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 00:00

Author: Arnold, Sarah Louise, 1859-1943, author.
Published: [Boston?] : Printed for the scholars, 1917.

Currently held at: DUKE

Catalogue "E" : issued May first, nineteen hundred nine.

Baskin Collection Additions - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 00:00

Author: Keramic Studio Publishing Company, publisher.
Published: Syracuse, New York : Keramic Studio Pub. Co., [1909]

Currently held at: DUKE

Stumbling-blocks

Baskin Collection Additions - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 00:00

Author: Hamilton, Gail, 1833-1896, author.
Published: Boston : Ticknor and Fields, 1864.

Currently held at: DUKE

Six sermons on the nature, occasions, signs, evils, and remedy of intemperance

Baskin Collection Additions - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 00:00

Author: Beecher, Lyman, 1775-1863, author.
Published: Boston : Crocker & Brewster, No. 47, Washington Street ; New York : J. Leavitt, 132, Broadway, 1827.

Currently held at: DUKE

Eclipse Chasers of the Rubenstein

Devil's Tale Posts - Thu, 08/17/2017 - 20:59

Post contributed by Noah Huffman, Archivist for Metadata, Systems, and Digital Records

Darkness is Coming.  I don’t know about you, but on Monday, August 21, I’m heading to Greenville, S.C., inside the path of totality for the Great American Eclipse of 2017.  It’s my first eclipse chase, but I was curious if there was evidence of any earlier eclipse chasers in our Rubenstein collections.  Here’s what I found:

Eclipse of November 30, 1834 – Washington, D.C. – Charles Wilkes

In 1833, Lieutenant Charles Wilkes (1798-1877) assumed command of the Navy’s Depot of Charts and Instruments, what would later become the Naval Observatory.  When a partial eclipse cast its shadow over D.C. the following year, Wilkes carried out a series of observations and measurements on a hill “directly north of the Capital, distant from it 1300 feet, and about 80 feet to the West of its center.”  Wilkes relayed his observations (in excruciating detail) to Secretary of the Navy Mahlon Dickerson in a letter dated December 13, 1834, found in the Rubenstein’s Charles Wilkes Papers:

Portrait of Lieutenant Charles Wilkes (1840) by Thomas Sully, U.S. Naval Academy Museum

Sir, Agreeably to your desire, I have the honor to report the following results of the observations made at this Depot on the Eclipse… The instruments employed in the observation were a three foot reflecting telescope by Troughton, a 42 inch refraction by Harris, and a 30 inch refraction by Gilbert, the former with a magnifying power of 175, the two latter with ones of 40… The times of beginning (meantime) 0.49.40, ending 3.30.01 afternoon…

I’ll spare you the rest of the details, which include temperature measurements (it dropped 24 degrees during the eclipse), notes on how he synchronized three clocks (very carefully), and nearly two-pages on his method for determining the precise latitude of his observatory. Compared to modern eclipse chasers, Wilkes’ comments are strictly scientific. There is no self-reflection in his account, no mention of prostrating and weeping in ecstasy, only an apology for his tardiness in sending his observations:  “…they would have been sent to you sooner but owing to a severe sickness I was unable to attend to them.”

Eclipse of July 18, 1860 – Cumberland House, Saskatchewan, Canada – William Ferrel

William Ferrel (1817-1891), the meteorologist not the comedian, spent most of his career studying “mid-latitude atmospheric circulation,” but as the total eclipse of 1860 approached he headed for more northern latitudes in the path of totality–all the way to Cumberland House, a remote outpost of the Hudson’s Bay Company in what is now Northern Saskatchewan.

Eclipse of July 18, 1860, Saskatchewan. William Ferrel Papers, Rubenstein Library.

Ferrell was dispatched from Boston north to Saskatchewan by Charles Henry Davis, the superintendent of the American Nautical Almanac Office. In a letter dated June 11, 1860, Davis wrote to Ferrel with instructions:

Eclipse, Cumberland House, Saskatchewan, July 18, 1860. William Ferrel Papers, Rubenstein Library.

I hereby instruct you to proceed to Cumberland House … for the purpose of making, in its vicinity and on the central line of shadow, observations upon the eclipse of the Sun of the 18th of July of this year…I have called your special attention, first, to the bulging protuberances, or rose colored prominences, seen at the time of total obscuration, in order that you may assist if possible in determining the question of their origin. Second, to the use of the polariscope, in the manner recommended by Arago; and, third, to the careful examination during the period of darkness, of the regions bordering on the Sun, for the possible discovery of inter-Mercurial planets…

While Ferrel’s papers don’t include any written record of his observations, we do have two photos he snapped during the period of totality. Don’t look directly at them, but if you squint you can maybe see some…bulging protuberances?

 

Eclipse of May 28, 1900 – North Carolina – Edward Featherston Small Portrait of Edward Featherston Small, Rubenstein Library

Edward Featherston Small (1844-1924) was a photographer, salesman for the Duke tobacco company, owner of a popular roller-skating team in Durham (it’s true!), and, in 1900, an amateur astronomer. When the path of totality crossed through central North Carolina on May 28, 1900, Small aimed his (large) telescope and camera to the heavens to capture the event. We can only hope he was wearing proper eye protection.

Edward Featherston Small with telescope, May 28, 1900. Rubenstein Library Eclipse, May 28, 1900, North Carolina. Edward Featherston Small Papers, Rubenstein Library

The post Eclipse Chasers of the Rubenstein appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Eclipse Chasers of the Rubenstein

Baskin Test - Thu, 08/17/2017 - 20:59

Post contributed by Noah Huffman, Archivist for Metadata, Systems, and Digital Records

Darkness is Coming.  I don’t know about you, but on Monday, August 21, I’m heading to Greenville, S.C., in the path of totality for the Great American Eclipse of 2017.  It’s my first eclipse chase, but I wondered if there was evidence of any earlier eclipse chasers in Rubenstein collections.  Here’s what I found:

Eclipse of November 30, 1834 – Washington, D.C. – Charles Wilkes

In 1833, Lieutenant Charles Wilkes (1798-1877) assumed command of the Navy’s Depot of Charts and Instruments, what would later become the Naval Observatory.  When a partial eclipse cast its shadow over D.C. the following year, Wilkes carried out a series of observations and measurements on a hill “directly north of the Capital, distant from it 1300 feet, and about 80 feet to the West of its center.”  Wilkes relayed his observations (in excruciating detail) to Secretary of the Navy Mahlon Dickerson in a letter dated December 13, 1834, found in the Rubenstein’s Charles Wilkes Papers:

Portrait of Lieutenant Charles Wilkes (1840) by Thomas Sully, U.S. Naval Academy Museum

Sir, Agreeably to your desire, I have the honor to report the following results of the observations made at this Depot on the Eclipse… The instruments employed in the observation were a three foot reflecting telescope by Troughton, a 42 inch refraction by Harris, and a 30 inch refraction by Gilbert, the former with a magnifying power of 175, the two latter with ones of 40… The times of beginning (meantime) 0.49.40, ending 3.30.01 afternoon…

I’ll spare you the rest of the details, which include temperature measurements (it dropped 24 degrees during the eclipse!), notes on how he synchronized three clocks (very carefully), and nearly two-pages on his method for determining the precise latitude of his observatory. Compared to modern eclipse chasers, Wilkes’ comments are strictly scientific. There is no self-reflection in his account, no mention of prostrating and weeping, only an apology for his tardiness in sending his observations:  “…they would have been sent to you sooner but owing to a severe sickness I was unable to attend to them.”

Eclipse of July 18, 1860 – Cumberland House, Saskatchewan, Canada – William Ferrel

William Ferrel (1817-1891), the meteorologist not the comedian, spent most of his career studying “mid-latitude atmospheric circulation,” but as the total eclipse of 1860 approached he headed for more northern latitudes in the path of totality–all the way to Cumberland House, a remote outpost of the Hudson’s Bay Company in Northern Saskatchewan.

Eclipse of July 18, 1860, Saskatchewan. William Ferrel Papers, Rubenstein Library.

Ferrell was dispatched to Saskatchewan by Charles Henry Davis, the superintendent of the American Nautical Almanac Office. In a letter dated June 11, 1860, Davis wrote to Ferrel with instructions:

Eclipse, Cumberland House, Saskatchewan, July 18, 1860. William Ferrel Papers, Rubenstein Library.

I hereby instruct you to proceed to Cumberland House … for the purpose of making, in its vicinity and on the central line of shadow, observations upon the eclipse of the Sun of the 18th of July of this year…I have called your special attention, first, to the bulging protuberances, or rose colored prominences, seen at the time of total obscuration, in order that you may assist if possible in determining the question of their origin. Second, to the use of the polariscope, in the manner recommended by Arago; and, third, to the careful examination during the period of darkness, of the regions bordering on the Sun, for the possible discovery of inter-Mercurial planets…

While Ferrel’s papers don’t include any written record of his observations, we do have two photos he snapped during the period of totality. Don’t look directly at them, but if you squint you can maybe see something…inter-Mercurial?

 

Eclipse of May 28, 1900 – North Carolina – Edward Featherston Small Portrait of Edward Featherston Small, Rubenstein Library

Edward Featherston Small (1844-1924) was a photographer, salesman for the Duke tobacco company, owner of a popular roller-skating team in Durham (it’s true!), and, in 1900, an amateur astronomer. When the path of totality crossed through central North Carolina on May 28, 1900, Small aimed his (large) telescope and camera to the heavens to capture the event. We can only hope he was wearing proper eye protection.

Edward Featherston Small with telescope, May 28, 1900. Rubenstein Library Eclipse, May 28, 1900, North Carolina. Edward Featherston Small Papers, Rubenstein Library

The post Eclipse Chasers of the Rubenstein appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Letters on education : with observations on religious and metaphysical subjects

Baskin Collection Additions - Thu, 08/17/2017 - 00:00

Author: Macaulay, Catharine, 1731-1791, author.
Published: London : Printed for C. Dilly, in the Poultry, MDCCXC [1790]

Currently held at: DUKE

What every girl should know

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 00:00

Author: Sanger, Margaret, 1879-1966, author.
Published: Girard, Kansas : Haldeman-Julius Company, [not before 1923]

Currently held at: DUKE

Women and their work

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 00:00

Author: Lyttelton, Mary Kathleen, 1856-1907, author.
Published: [London] : Methuen & Co., 36 Essex Street W.C., 1901.

Currently held at: DUKE

Characteristics of women : moral, poetical, and historical

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 00:00

Author: Jameson, Mrs. (Anna), 1794-1860, author.
Published: Boston : James R. Osgood and Company, late Ticknor & Fields, and Fields, Osgood, & Co., 1875.

Currently held at: DUKE

Clarissa : a novel

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 00:00

Author: Richardson, Samuel, 1689-1761, author.
Published: London : Tinsley Brothers, 18, Catherine St., Strand, 1868.

Currently held at: DUKE

Teverino : a romance

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 00:00

Author: Sand, George, 1804-1876, author.
Published: New York : W.P. Fetridge & Co., publishers, Franklin Square ; Boston : Fetridge and Co. 100 Washington St., 1855.

Currently held at: DUKE

A handbook for travellers on the continent : being a guide to Holland, Belgium, Prussia, northern Germany, and the Rhine from Holland to Switzerland : with map and plans.

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 08/16/2017 - 00:00

Published: London : John Murray, Albemarle Street ; Paris : A. & W. Galignani and Co., Stassin and Xavier, 1854.

Currently held at: DUKE