Guantanamo and the Trump Presidency: Peter Honigsberg, Witness to Guantanamo Project

Rubenstein Library Events - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 16:00
Other (see event description)West Campus

President Donald Trump had said that he would “load [Guantanamo] up with some bad dudes.” He also said that he would be willing to bring American citizens to Guantanamo for trial, although current law forbids the trial of Americans in Guantanamo. What does the future hold for the current 41 prisoners at Guantanamo, and could the Trump Administration transfer other alleged terrorists to Guantanamo?

 

The Witness to Guantanamo Project is the world’s most comprehensive collection of filmed stories about the prison camps at the U.S. naval base in Cuba. Join Peter Honigsberg, founder and director, for a special lunchtime discussion. Free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided.

 

Location: Forum for Scholars and Publics, 011 Old Chem Building

Sponsored by the Human Rights Archive in the Rubenstein Library and the Forum for Scholars and Publics.

 

More about the Witness to Guantanamo Project:

witnesstoguantanamo.com

 

For more information, contact:

Patrick Stawski, Human Rights Archivist

 

Re-Imagining: Revisited and Revived

Rubenstein Library Events - Wed, 04/19/2017 - 04:00
Other (see event description)West Campus

Distinguished historian Dr. Sara M. Evans, WC’ 66, and feminist theologian Dr. Sherry Jordon will facilitate a conversation on the future of the Re-Imagining Movement, nearly 25 years after 2000+ theologians, clergy, and laity assembled at the first Re-Imagining conference to address injustices to women and promote equal partnership with men at all levels of religious life.

Location: Forum for Scholars and Publics (Old Chemistry Building 011)

Light lunch will be served beginning at 11:45am. 

Co-Sponsored by the Forum for Scholars and Publics, the Office of Religious Life, Duke University Chapel, and the Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies at Duke University.

Re-Imagining: Revisited and Revived

Rubenstein Library Events - Tue, 04/18/2017 - 20:00
Rubenstein 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)West Campus

Distinguished historian Dr. Sara M. Evans, WC’ 66, will provide a history of the Re-Imagining Movement nearly 25 years after 2000+ theologians, clergy, and laity assembled at the first Re-Imagining conference to address injustices to women and promote equal partnership with men at all levels of religious life. Reception to follow. 

Co-Sponsored by the Forum for Scholars and Publics, the Office of Religious Life, Duke University Chapel, and the Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies at Duke University.

Kate Zambreno: Book of Mutter (Reading)

Rubenstein Library Events - Thu, 04/06/2017 - 21:00
Other (see event description)East Campus

Location: Pink Parlor, East Duke Building

Author Kate Zambreno will read from her new publication Book of Mutter. From the MIT Press website: “Composed over thirteen years, Kate Zambreno’s Book of Mutter is a tender and disquieting meditation on the ability of writing, photography, and memory to embrace shadows while in the throes—and dead calm—of grief.” Kate Zambreno is the author of two novels, O Fallen Angel and Green Girl. She is also the author of the work Heroines (Semiotext(e)). She teaches in the writing programs at Columbia University and Sarah Lawrence College. Co-sponsored by the English Department, Program in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies, and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

"Sharing Our Stories" reception for Veteran Feminists of America Conference

Rubenstein Library Events - Thu, 03/30/2017 - 20:00
Rubenstein 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)West Campus

The Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture will present a display of materials from the Veteran Feminists of America records as well as the papers of Southern feminists and will offer tours of the Rubenstein Library spaces. This part of the program is free and open to the public (registration not required).

This event is part of the program for "Sharing Our Stories:  The Second Wave Feminist Movement" hosted by Veteran Feminists of America (VFA) on March 31, 2017. at the Hilton Durham Hotel, 3800 Hillsborough Rd., Durham, NC. Registration required

The VFA will present a conference including a keynote lecture and panel discussions between Second Wave activists and historians who are studying the women’s movement.. Featured speakers include Dr. Nancy MacLean (Duke, History Department), Mandy Carter (National Black Justice Coalition), and others. 

WOLA-Duke Human Rights Book Award, Chad Broughton, “Boom, Bust, Exodus: The Rust Belt, the Maquilas, and a Tale of Two Cities”

Rubenstein Library Events - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 21:30
Other (see event description)East Campus

Boom, Bust, Exodus (Oxford UP, 2015) traces the ripple effects of a single factory closing in Galesburg, Illinois, and its reopening in Reynosa, Tamaulipas, a border city in Mexico. Chad Broughton uses a transnational and longitudinal approach to tell a human and humane story of the NAFTA era from the point of view of those most caught up in its dislocation—former industrial workers and their families in the Rust Belt; assemblers and activists in the borderland maquiladoras; and migrant laborers from the Mexican countryside.

Boom, Bust, Exodus is the winner of the 2016 WOLA-Duke Human Rights Book Award, sponsored by the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA) and Duke University. The award honors the best current fiction and non-fiction book published in English on human rights, democracy and social justice in contemporary Latin America. Books are evaluated by a panel of expert judges drawn from academia, journalism and public policy circles.

Location: Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall, Smith Warehouse, Bay 4

Sponsored by the Human Rights Archive in the Rubenstein Library, Duke Human Rights Center@the Franklin Humanities Institute, and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

 

More about the book:

 

For more information, contact:

Patrick Stawski, Human Rights Archivist

 

Mystery in the Stacks – A Library Party to Die For

Rubenstein Library Events - Sat, 03/04/2017 - 02:00
Other (see event description)West Campus

The Library Party is a unique Duke tradition. For one night only, Perkins and Bostock Libraries throw open their doors for a night of music, food, and un-shushed entertainment. The event is free and open to the entire Duke community.

After a couple of years on hiatus, the Library Party is back! Once again, the Libraries are partnering with the Duke Marketing Club to organize this year’s event. The theme—“Mystery in the Stacks”—is inspired by classic works of mystery and detective fiction.

The event will feature live music, costumes, decorations, food and beverages, and plenty of mystery!

Location
Perkins and Bostock Libraries, 1st Floor

Admission
Free and open to the Duke community

Dress
Semi-formal attire, or dress as your favorite mystery character!

Advance Wristband Sales (New This Year!)
To cut down on lines at the event, drink wristbands will be available for purchase (credit card only) the week of February 27-March 3 at Saladelia locations in von der Heyden, West Union, and the Sanford School of Public Policy. Legal ID required. Get yours ahead of time and avoid the line.

Never been to a Library Party?
Check out these images, videos, and recaps from our Life is a Cabaret Party in 2014, Heroes and Villains Party in 2012, and the Mad Men and Mad Women Party in 2011.

RSVP
On Facebook, and share!

Keep the Mystery Going
The Library Party will be followed by a Freewater Presentations screening of Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho in Griffith Theater at 12:15 a.m.

Many thanks to our not-so-mysterious co-sponsors: the Office of the President, Office of the Provost, Markets & Management Studies, Program in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies, and Duke Student Government.

For more information, contact:

Aaron Welborn, Director of Communications

 

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Visiting Filmmaker: Carlos Sandoval | Reception & Public Conversation

Rubenstein Library Events - Thu, 03/02/2017 - 22:00
Rubenstein 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)West Campus

Public conversation with Dr. Diamonstein-Spielvogel on Sandoval's filmmaking career. Refreshments at 5:00, conversation begins at 5:30pm. More info: http://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/documentaryarts/news

2017 Andrew T. Nadell Prize for Book Collecting

Rubenstein Library Events - Tue, 02/28/2017 - 18:30
Rubenstein 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)West Campus

The Nadell Prize for Book Collecting is held every other year to promote the development of students’ personal libraries. The contest is named for Dr. Andrew T. Nadell M’74, who began collecting rare books when he was a student at Duke. The contest is open to all students enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate/professional degree program at Duke.

Members of the public are invited to a showing at which undergraduate and graduate student competitors will have selections from their collections on display and answer questions about the works they collect.

Winners of the contest will also be eligible to enter the National Collegiate Book Collecting Contest, where they will compete for a $2,500 prize and an invitation to the awards ceremony in Washington, D.C., at the Library of Congress.

For more information, contact:

Megan Crain, Development Assistant

 

Sophia Foord letter to Robert Adams, 1848 May 8.

Baskin Collection Additions - Fri, 02/24/2017 - 00:00

Author: Foord, Sophia, 1802-1885, correspondent.

Currently held at: DUKE

Lydia Bailey account statement, 1823 April 02.

Baskin Collection Additions - Fri, 02/24/2017 - 00:00

Author: Bailey, Lydia R., 1779-1869, creator.

Currently held at: DUKE

Maria de Bruyn Papers

Current Exhibits - Thu, 02/23/2017 - 21:35

Maria de Bruyn is a medical anthropologist who worked for non-profit organizations in The Netherlands and United States, as well as international non-governmental and United Nations agencies, in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) with a special focus on HIV and AIDS and health-related human rights. She donated her historical papers to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library in 2015. 

Beef & Okra Gumbo (1957) – Rubenstein Library Test Kitchen

Baskin Test - Thu, 02/23/2017 - 21:11

Post contributed by Ashley Rose Young, a Ph.D. candidate in History at Duke University and the Business History Graduate Intern at the Hartman Center.

Throwing a Mardi Gras-themed party this weekend? Then check out this gumbo recipe!

New Orleans Carnival season is in full swing with Mardi Gras fast approaching. My Twitter feed is full of images of brightly clad parade goers and heaps of dazzling beads. Scrolling through my feed the other day, nostalgia overwhelmed me. I had been missing New Orleans, the subject of my dissertation research. In that moment, I wanted one thing: gumbo.

With a goal to kick off the Rubenstein Test Kitchen in 2017, I thought I could make gumbo from a historic recipe, satiating my emotional need for it while also sharing my passion for the dish with wider audiences. There was one flaw in my plan, though. I had already written a blog post for the Devil’s Tale on Shrimp Gumbo Filé. As I pointed out in that post, however, New Orleans-style gumbo is anything but formulaic and reflects the complexity of New Orleans’ Creole food culture. There were an infinite number of combinations that I could draw upon to make a gumbo dish that would look nothing like the one I had made a few years ago.

So, I set out to look for a gumbo recipe that stood in contrast to the meaty seafood stew I had previously made from the Picayune’s Creole Cook Book (1916). Whereas I tend to gravitate towards roux-based stews with chicken, ham, and seafood, I knew that there were entirely different gumbo traditions—ones that drew upon ingredients that I have never tried in my gumbos.

Ladies Home Journal (1957). David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

I found just the recipe I was looking for in an article published in a 1957 issue of Ladies Home Journal. This was a beef-based stew with tomatoes and okra, among other unfamiliar gumbo ingredients like basil and oregano. The recipe came from an article titled, “Main Dishes with a Southern Accent,” written by Dorothy James, a native New Orleanian.

Okra Gumbo

Buy 2 pounds of either stewing beef or veal cut into 1” cubes. Put in a heavy kettle or Dutch oven along with 2 cups water, 2 cups chopped onion, ¾ cup chopped green pepper, ¾ cup chopped celery, 2 cloves garlic, crushed. Season with 1½  teaspoons salt, 1½ teaspoons gumbo filé, 1 teaspoon sugar, ½ teaspoon basil, ½ teaspoon orégano, 1/8 teaspoon pepper and a dash of crushed red-pepper flakes. Gumbo filé is innate to gumbo as far as Southern cooks are concerned, but it is not generally available in the North. It may be omitted, in which case add a little more red pepper and herbs. Simmer, covered, for 1 hour. Separate the meat from the broth and set both aside. Make a brown roux with ¼ cup flour and ¼ cup bacon drippings. Add the broth, 4 fresh tomatoes, peeled and quartered, and 1 cup tomato sauce. Cover and cook until the sauce is well blended. Then add the meat, cover again, and simmer gently about 45 minutes longer. Stir occasionally to prevent sticking. Wash and trim 1½ pounds fresh okra. Then cut into ½” pieces—there will be about 3 cups. (You can use two 10-ounce packages of frozen okra). Add to the gumbo and cook another 20-30 minutes, or until the okra is tender. Serve with rice. Makes 6 servings.

The final product was incredibly tasty. The gumbo, which had three kinds of thickener (filé powder, roux, and okra slime), had a decadent, creamy texture. The tomato was not overwhelming and provided a tangy, sweet undercurrent that blended nicely with the kick of the red pepper flakes. I had to add a bit more salt to balance the flavors in the dish to my liking. Overall, it was a satisfying meal that showcased both beef and okra beautifully.

As is the case with any recipe, there are tips, tricks, and “trade secrets” that are regularly left out. I’ve added some notes to help create the most flavor-packed gumbo possible.

I purchased a fatty beef brisket from the local grocery store. The more fat in the meat, the more flavorful the stock. I also patted my beef try with a paper towel (thanks for the tip, Julia Child) and browned it in 2 tablespoons of oil to start a nice faun on the bottom of the pan. After a few minutes, I pulled the beef out, added a bit more oil to the pan, and sautéed my vegetables for 5 minutes. Then, I added the beef back in along with the water and spices. I added an extra cup of water so that the beef was almost completely covered.

After letting the stew simmer for an hour, I separated the beef and broth, trimming the extra fat off the beef once the meat had cooled. In the meantime, I washed out my cast iron pot and prepped to make a roux, the base of most Creole stews. For a detailed lesson on how to make a roux, see my previous blog post on gumbo. This time, I decided to make a quick roux, in ten minutes or less. I heated up equal parts oil and fat over medium-high heat and stirred constantly. My roux went from butter yellow to Hershey’s chocolate bar brown in about 9 minutes. I poured the broth back in and then added the tomatoes and tomato sauce, and eventually the beef (watch for splatter from the hot roux).

Finally, I added in the okra, and allowed the gumbo to simmer for another 30 minutes, while I prepared rice.

Voila!

The post Beef & Okra Gumbo (1957) – Rubenstein Library Test Kitchen appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Beef & Okra Gumbo (1957) – Rubenstein Library Test Kitchen

Devil's Tale Posts - Thu, 02/23/2017 - 21:11

Post contributed by Ashley Rose Young, a Ph.D. candidate in History at Duke University and the Business History Graduate Intern at the Hartman Center.

Throwing a Mardi Gras-themed party this weekend? Then check out this gumbo recipe!

New Orleans Carnival season is in full swing with Mardi Gras fast approaching. My Twitter feed is full of images of brightly clad parade goers and heaps of dazzling beads. Scrolling through my feed the other day, nostalgia overwhelmed me. I had been missing New Orleans, the subject of my dissertation research. In that moment, I wanted one thing: gumbo.

With a goal to kick off the Rubenstein Test Kitchen in 2017, I thought I could make gumbo from a historic recipe, satiating my emotional need for it while also sharing my passion for the dish with wider audiences. There was one flaw in my plan, though. I had already written a blog post for the Devil’s Tale on Shrimp Gumbo Filé. As I pointed out in that post, however, New Orleans-style gumbo is anything but formulaic and reflects the complexity of New Orleans’ Creole food culture. There were an infinite number of combinations that I could draw upon to make a gumbo dish that would look nothing like the one I had made a few years ago.

So, I set out to look for a gumbo recipe that stood in contrast to the meaty seafood stew I had previously made from the Picayune’s Creole Cook Book (1916). Whereas I tend to gravitate towards roux-based stews with chicken, ham, and seafood, I knew that there were entirely different gumbo traditions—ones that drew upon ingredients that I have never tried in my gumbos.

Ladies Home Journal (1957). David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

I found just the recipe I was looking for in an article published in a 1957 issue of Ladies Home Journal. This was a beef-based stew with tomatoes and okra, among other unfamiliar gumbo ingredients like basil and oregano. The recipe came from an article titled, “Main Dishes with a Southern Accent,” written by Dorothy James, a native New Orleanian.

Okra Gumbo

Buy 2 pounds of either stewing beef or veal cut into 1” cubes. Put in a heavy kettle or Dutch oven along with 2 cups water, 2 cups chopped onion, ¾ cup chopped green pepper, ¾ cup chopped celery, 2 cloves garlic, crushed. Season with 1½  teaspoons salt, 1½ teaspoons gumbo filé, 1 teaspoon sugar, ½ teaspoon basil, ½ teaspoon orégano, 1/8 teaspoon pepper and a dash of crushed red-pepper flakes. Gumbo filé is innate to gumbo as far as Southern cooks are concerned, but it is not generally available in the North. It may be omitted, in which case add a little more red pepper and herbs. Simmer, covered, for 1 hour. Separate the meat from the broth and set both aside. Make a brown roux with ¼ cup flour and ¼ cup bacon drippings. Add the broth, 4 fresh tomatoes, peeled and quartered, and 1 cup tomato sauce. Cover and cook until the sauce is well blended. Then add the meat, cover again, and simmer gently about 45 minutes longer. Stir occasionally to prevent sticking. Wash and trim 1½ pounds fresh okra. Then cut into ½” pieces—there will be about 3 cups. (You can use two 10-ounce packages of frozen okra). Add to the gumbo and cook another 20-30 minutes, or until the okra is tender. Serve with rice. Makes 6 servings.

The final product was incredibly tasty. The gumbo, which had three kinds of thickener (filé powder, roux, and okra slime), had a decadent, creamy texture. The tomato was not overwhelming and provided a tangy, sweet undercurrent that blended nicely with the kick of the red pepper flakes. I had to add a bit more salt to balance the flavors in the dish to my liking. Overall, it was a satisfying meal that showcased both beef and okra beautifully.

As is the case with any recipe, there are tips, tricks, and “trade secrets” that are regularly left out. I’ve added some notes to help create the most flavor-packed gumbo possible.

I purchased a fatty beef brisket from the local grocery store. The more fat in the meat, the more flavorful the stock. I also patted my beef try with a paper towel (thanks for the tip, Julia Child) and browned it in 2 tablespoons of oil to start a nice faun on the bottom of the pan. After a few minutes, I pulled the beef out, added a bit more oil to the pan, and sautéed my vegetables for 5 minutes. Then, I added the beef back in along with the water and spices. I added an extra cup of water so that the beef was almost completely covered.

After letting the stew simmer for an hour, I separated the beef and broth, trimming the extra fat off the beef once the meat had cooled. In the meantime, I washed out my cast iron pot and prepped to make a roux, the base of most Creole stews. For a detailed lesson on how to make a roux, see my previous blog post on gumbo. This time, I decided to make a quick roux, in ten minutes or less. I heated up equal parts oil and fat over medium-high heat and stirred constantly. My roux went from butter yellow to Hershey’s chocolate bar brown in about 9 minutes. I poured the broth back in and then added the tomatoes and tomato sauce, and eventually the beef (watch for splatter from the hot roux).

Finally, I added in the okra, and allowed the gumbo to simmer for another 30 minutes, while I prepared rice.

Voila!

The post Beef & Okra Gumbo (1957) – Rubenstein Library Test Kitchen appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Capturing the Moment: Centuries of the Passover Haggadah

Current Exhibits - Thu, 02/23/2017 - 16:08

The Haggadah, a Jewish text written for the Passover Seder meal, has a long and interesting published  history. This exhibition will explore Haggadot illustrations and texts over the years and how these works can shed light on cultural, religious and political changes over time. 

Housewives build a new world.

Baskin Collection Additions - Thu, 02/23/2017 - 00:00

Author: Freundlich, Emmy, 1878-1948, author.
Published: London : Published by International Co-operative Women's Guild, Stanfield House, Prince Arthur Road, Hamstead, [1936]

Currently held at: DUKE

A legacy to wage-earning women : a survey of gainfully employed women of Brattleboro, Vermont, and of relief which they have received from the Thomas Thompson trust

Baskin Collection Additions - Thu, 02/23/2017 - 00:00

Author: Eaves, Lucile, 1869- author.
Published: Boston, Massachusetts : Women's Educational and Industrial Union, 1925.

Currently held at: DUKE

One thousand homeless men : a study of original records

Baskin Collection Additions - Thu, 02/23/2017 - 00:00

Author: Solenberger, Alice Willard, -1910, author.
Published: New York : Survey Associates, Inc., MCMXIV [1914]copyright 1911

Currently held at: DUKE

Lydia Maria Child letters, 1863-1873.

Baskin Collection Additions - Thu, 02/23/2017 - 00:00

Author: Child, Lydia Maria, 1802-1880, correspondent.

Currently held at: DUKE