Pioneering African-American Women in the Advertising Business

Rubenstein Library Events - Wed, 02/22/2017 - 20:30
Rubenstein 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)West Campus

Dr. Judy Foster Davis of Eastern Michigan University’s College of Business will present on her research into the history of African-American women who have worked in the advertising industry. She has recently published a new book on this topic. Her research focuses on marketing communications strategies and policies in corporate and entrepreneurial settings and historical and multicultural marketing topics. This event is part of the Hartman Center’s 25th Anniversary lecture series focusing on women in advertising.

Co-sponsored by the Baldwin Scholars and African & African American Studies.

 

Looking at Jay Anderson’s Historical Photos of Duke

Baskin Test - Wed, 02/22/2017 - 15:35

Post contributed by Tracy Jackson, Technical Services Archivist for the Duke University Archives.

The University Archives recently completed processing of the Jay Carl Anderson Photographs and Papers, a collection with many images of Duke’s campus, students, and athletic events, as well as politicians, scenes of Durham and elsewhere in North Carolina, and many other locations and subjects, mostly dating from the 1970s and 1980s. The collection is a rich new resource for researchers interested in Blue Devils men’s basketball, student life, campus protests, the city of Durham, political campaigning in NC, and photojournalism, and it offers many beautiful and fascinating new views of familiar subjects.

East Campus pavilion, circa 1980

Jay Anderson was a native of New York State who enrolled at Duke in 1974. He first published a photograph in his local newspaper at 16, and by the time he was a Duke student he was working as a freelance photographer submitting images to the New York Times. He took pictures for the Chronicle and then became involved with the Chanticleer, serving as editor for the 1978 Chanticleer during his senior year. He photographed many aspects of life at Duke, taking pictures of students, classes, events, and scenes on campus, as well as representing life off campus, snapping pictures of life in the surrounding neighborhoods, downtown Durham, and elsewhere in the Triangle. He also traveled, spending about six months in Europe and going as far east as Moscow, photographing life in the Soviet Union in 1977. He brought many of these images back to the Duke community, publishing spreads in the Chronicle and showing his work in exhibits and contests.

A 1975 issue of the Chronicle featuring Anderson’s images of people in Durham.

Anderson also photographed political persons and events, attending and photographing the 1976 Democratic National Convention in New York City and capturing presidential candidates and politicians, both on and off the campaign trail.

Jimmy Carter at a 1976 Presidential Debate on the campus of the College of William and Mary.

A resident of Pegram dormitory, he took a number of photos of friends and residents. New to Durham and the South when he arrived at Duke, he took an interest in life off campus and in the surrounding areas, including residents in nearby neighborhoods, events downtown, and the State Fair in Raleigh. He documented campus protests and performances, including visits from celebrities and politicians. And he lovingly captured athletics, particularly men’s basketball, capturing many of the players and fans mid-action.

UNC-Chapel Hill vs. Duke Men’s Basketball Game, January 14, 1978.

 

Johnny Dawkins, Colorado vs. Duke Men’s Basketball Game, December 21, 1983.

Many of the images are not labeled or identified, or have only general topical labels. As with many photographic collections, identifying information can sometimes be found in the image itself. Anderson also kept copies of many publications featuring his work, which include additional description.

1980 Duke/UNC basketball game, image submitted to New York Times.

After graduation, Jay Anderson remained in Durham for many years, and continued to photograph Duke events, particularly men’s basketball, and he remained involved with the Chanticleer for several years. He became the official photographer for the American Dance Festival and worked as a freelance photographer for a variety of publications as well as for private commercial work (his ADF photographs can be found in the Jay Anderson Papers in the American Dance Festival Archives, also housed here at Duke).

We’re excited to make this collection available to researchers. For anyone with an interest in Duke, politics, photography, or any number of related topics, the Jay Carl Anderson Photographs and Papers offers a lot to explore.

The post Looking at Jay Anderson’s Historical Photos of Duke appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Looking at Jay Anderson’s Historical Photos of Duke

Tech Services Feed - Wed, 02/22/2017 - 15:35

Post contributed by Tracy Jackson, Technical Services Archivist for the Duke University Archives.

The University Archives recently completed processing of the Jay Carl Anderson Photographs and Papers, a collection with many images of Duke’s campus, students, and athletic events, as well as politicians, scenes of Durham and elsewhere in North Carolina, and many other locations and subjects, mostly dating from the 1970s and 1980s. The collection is a rich new resource for researchers interested in Blue Devils men’s basketball, student life, campus protests, the city of Durham, political campaigning in NC, and photojournalism, and it offers many beautiful and fascinating new views of familiar subjects.

East Campus pavilion, circa 1980

Jay Anderson was a native of New York State who enrolled at Duke in 1974. He first published a photograph in his local newspaper at 16, and by the time he was a Duke student he was working as a freelance photographer submitting images to the New York Times. He took pictures for the Chronicle and then became involved with the Chanticleer, serving as editor for the 1978 Chanticleer during his senior year. He photographed many aspects of life at Duke, taking pictures of students, classes, events, and scenes on campus, as well as representing life off campus, snapping pictures of life in the surrounding neighborhoods, downtown Durham, and elsewhere in the Triangle. He also traveled, spending about six months in Europe and going as far east as Moscow, photographing life in the Soviet Union in 1977. He brought many of these images back to the Duke community, publishing spreads in the Chronicle and showing his work in exhibits and contests.

A 1975 issue of the Chronicle featuring Anderson’s images of people in Durham.

Anderson also photographed political persons and events, attending and photographing the 1976 Democratic National Convention in New York City and capturing presidential candidates and politicians, both on and off the campaign trail.

Jimmy Carter at a 1976 Presidential Debate on the campus of the College of William and Mary.

A resident of Pegram dormitory, he took a number of photos of friends and residents. New to Durham and the South when he arrived at Duke, he took an interest in life off campus and in the surrounding areas, including residents in nearby neighborhoods, events downtown, and the State Fair in Raleigh. He documented campus protests and performances, including visits from celebrities and politicians. And he lovingly captured athletics, particularly men’s basketball, capturing many of the players and fans mid-action.

UNC-Chapel Hill vs. Duke Men’s Basketball Game, January 14, 1978.

 

Johnny Dawkins, Colorado vs. Duke Men’s Basketball Game, December 21, 1983.

Many of the images are not labeled or identified, or have only general topical labels. As with many photographic collections, identifying information can sometimes be found in the image itself. Anderson also kept copies of many publications featuring his work, which include additional description.

1980 Duke/UNC basketball game, image submitted to New York Times.

After graduation, Jay Anderson remained in Durham for many years, and continued to photograph Duke events, particularly men’s basketball, and he remained involved with the Chanticleer for several years. He became the official photographer for the American Dance Festival and worked as a freelance photographer for a variety of publications as well as for private commercial work (his ADF photographs can be found in the Jay Anderson Papers in the American Dance Festival Archives, also housed here at Duke).

We’re excited to make this collection available to researchers. For anyone with an interest in Duke, politics, photography, or any number of related topics, the Jay Carl Anderson Photographs and Papers offers a lot to explore.

The post Looking at Jay Anderson’s Historical Photos of Duke appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Looking at Jay Anderson’s Historical Photos of Duke

Devil's Tale Posts - Wed, 02/22/2017 - 15:35

Post contributed by Tracy Jackson, Technical Services Archivist for the Duke University Archives.

The University Archives recently completed processing of the Jay Carl Anderson Photographs and Papers, a collection with many images of Duke’s campus, students, and athletic events, as well as politicians, scenes of Durham and elsewhere in North Carolina, and many other locations and subjects, mostly dating from the 1970s and 1980s. The collection is a rich new resource for researchers interested in Blue Devils men’s basketball, student life, campus protests, the city of Durham, political campaigning in NC, and photojournalism, and it offers many beautiful and fascinating new views of familiar subjects.

East Campus pavilion, circa 1980

Jay Anderson was a native of New York State who enrolled at Duke in 1974. He first published a photograph in his local newspaper at 16, and by the time he was a Duke student he was working as a freelance photographer submitting images to the New York Times. He took pictures for the Chronicle and then became involved with the Chanticleer, serving as editor for the 1978 Chanticleer during his senior year. He photographed many aspects of life at Duke, taking pictures of students, classes, events, and scenes on campus, as well as representing life off campus, snapping pictures of life in the surrounding neighborhoods, downtown Durham, and elsewhere in the Triangle. He also traveled, spending about six months in Europe and going as far east as Moscow, photographing life in the Soviet Union in 1977. He brought many of these images back to the Duke community, publishing spreads in the Chronicle and showing his work in exhibits and contests.

A 1975 issue of the Chronicle featuring Anderson’s images of people in Durham.

Anderson also photographed political persons and events, attending and photographing the 1976 Democratic National Convention in New York City and capturing presidential candidates and politicians, both on and off the campaign trail.

Jimmy Carter at a 1976 Presidential Debate on the campus of the College of William and Mary.

A resident of Pegram dormitory, he took a number of photos of friends and residents. New to Durham and the South when he arrived at Duke, he took an interest in life off campus and in the surrounding areas, including residents in nearby neighborhoods, events downtown, and the State Fair in Raleigh. He documented campus protests and performances, including visits from celebrities and politicians. And he lovingly captured athletics, particularly men’s basketball, capturing many of the players and fans mid-action.

UNC-Chapel Hill vs. Duke Men’s Basketball Game, January 14, 1978.

 

Johnny Dawkins, Colorado vs. Duke Men’s Basketball Game, December 21, 1983.

Many of the images are not labeled or identified, or have only general topical labels. As with many photographic collections, identifying information can sometimes be found in the image itself. Anderson also kept copies of many publications featuring his work, which include additional description.

1980 Duke/UNC basketball game, image submitted to New York Times.

After graduation, Jay Anderson remained in Durham for many years, and continued to photograph Duke events, particularly men’s basketball, and he remained involved with the Chanticleer for several years. He became the official photographer for the American Dance Festival and worked as a freelance photographer for a variety of publications as well as for private commercial work (his ADF photographs can be found in the Jay Anderson Papers in the American Dance Festival Archives, also housed here at Duke).

We’re excited to make this collection available to researchers. For anyone with an interest in Duke, politics, photography, or any number of related topics, the Jay Carl Anderson Photographs and Papers offers a lot to explore.

The post Looking at Jay Anderson’s Historical Photos of Duke appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Looking at Jay Anderson’s Historical Photos of Duke

UArchives blog posts - Wed, 02/22/2017 - 15:35

Post contributed by Tracy Jackson, Technical Services Archivist for the Duke University Archives.

The University Archives recently completed processing of the Jay Carl Anderson Photographs and Papers, a collection with many images of Duke’s campus, students, and athletic events, as well as politicians, scenes of Durham and elsewhere in North Carolina, and many other locations and subjects, mostly dating from the 1970s and 1980s. The collection is a rich new resource for researchers interested in Blue Devils men’s basketball, student life, campus protests, the city of Durham, political campaigning in NC, and photojournalism, and it offers many beautiful and fascinating new views of familiar subjects.

East Campus pavilion, circa 1980

Jay Anderson was a native of New York State who enrolled at Duke in 1974. He first published a photograph in his local newspaper at 16, and by the time he was a Duke student he was working as a freelance photographer submitting images to the New York Times. He took pictures for the Chronicle and then became involved with the Chanticleer, serving as editor for the 1978 Chanticleer during his senior year. He photographed many aspects of life at Duke, taking pictures of students, classes, events, and scenes on campus, as well as representing life off campus, snapping pictures of life in the surrounding neighborhoods, downtown Durham, and elsewhere in the Triangle. He also traveled, spending about six months in Europe and going as far east as Moscow, photographing life in the Soviet Union in 1977. He brought many of these images back to the Duke community, publishing spreads in the Chronicle and showing his work in exhibits and contests.

A 1975 issue of the Chronicle featuring Anderson’s images of people in Durham.

Anderson also photographed political persons and events, attending and photographing the 1976 Democratic National Convention in New York City and capturing presidential candidates and politicians, both on and off the campaign trail.

Jimmy Carter at a 1976 Presidential Debate on the campus of the College of William and Mary.

A resident of Pegram dormitory, he took a number of photos of friends and residents. New to Durham and the South when he arrived at Duke, he took an interest in life off campus and in the surrounding areas, including residents in nearby neighborhoods, events downtown, and the State Fair in Raleigh. He documented campus protests and performances, including visits from celebrities and politicians. And he lovingly captured athletics, particularly men’s basketball, capturing many of the players and fans mid-action.

UNC-Chapel Hill vs. Duke Men’s Basketball Game, January 14, 1978.

 

Johnny Dawkins, Colorado vs. Duke Men’s Basketball Game, December 21, 1983.

Many of the images are not labeled or identified, or have only general topical labels. As with many photographic collections, identifying information can sometimes be found in the image itself. Anderson also kept copies of many publications featuring his work, which include additional description.

1980 Duke/UNC basketball game, image submitted to New York Times.

After graduation, Jay Anderson remained in Durham for many years, and continued to photograph Duke events, particularly men’s basketball, and he remained involved with the Chanticleer for several years. He became the official photographer for the American Dance Festival and worked as a freelance photographer for a variety of publications as well as for private commercial work (his ADF photographs can be found in the Jay Anderson Papers in the American Dance Festival Archives, also housed here at Duke).

We’re excited to make this collection available to researchers. For anyone with an interest in Duke, politics, photography, or any number of related topics, the Jay Carl Anderson Photographs and Papers offers a lot to explore.

The post Looking at Jay Anderson’s Historical Photos of Duke appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Wives & mothers in Victorian industry

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 02/22/2017 - 00:00

Author: Hewitt, Margaret, 1928- author.
Published: Salisbury Square, London : Rockliff, [1958]

Currently held at: DUKE

The Negro in the slaughtering and meat-packing industry in Chicago

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 02/22/2017 - 00:00

Author: Herbst, Alma, 1892-1968, author.
Published: Boston and New York : Houghton Mifflin Company, 1932.

Currently held at: DUKE

The woman who toils : being the experiences of two gentlewomen as factory girls

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 02/22/2017 - 00:00

Author: Van Vorst, John, Mrs., 1873-1928, author.
Published: Toronto : George N. Morang, Co. Limited, 1903.

Currently held at: DUKE

Book Talk: Sydney Nathans, Author of "A Mind to Stay: White Plantation, Black Homeland" (2017)

Rubenstein Library Events - Tue, 02/21/2017 - 21:00
Rubenstein 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)West Campus

In his new book, Sydney Nathans, Professor Emeritus of History at Duke, tells the rare story of people who moved from being enslaved to becoming owners of the very land they had worked in bondage, and who have held on to it from emancipation through the Civil Rights era.

The story began in 1844, when North Carolina planter Paul Cameron bought 1,600 acres near Greensboro, Alabama, and sent out 114 enslaved people to cultivate cotton and enlarge his fortune. In the 1870s, he sold the plantation to emancipated black families who worked there. 

Drawing on thousands of letters from the planter and on interviews with descendants of those who bought the land, A Mind to Stay: White Plantation, Black Homeland (Harvard, 2017) unravels how and why the planter’s former laborers purchased the site of their enslavement, kept its name as Cameron Place, and defended their homeland against challengers from the Jim Crow era to the present day.

Through the prism of a single plantation and the destiny of black families that dwelt on it for over a century and a half, A Mind to Stay brings to life a vivid cast of characters and illuminates the changing meaning of land and landowning to successive generations of rural African Americans. Those who remained fought to make their lives fully free—for themselves, for their neighbors, and for those who might someday return.

Free and open to the public. Copies of the book will be for sale at the event.

Sponsored by the Duke University Libraries, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

 

For more information, contact:

Aaron Welborn, Director of Communications

 

Life lessons : trvths concerning people who have lived

Baskin Collection Additions - Tue, 02/21/2017 - 00:00

Author: Hubbard, Alice, 1861-1915, author.
Published: East Avrora, New York : The Roycrofters, [1909]

Currently held at: DUKE

The married women's property act : passed, August, 1882, becomes law, January 1st, 1883.

Baskin Collection Additions - Tue, 02/21/2017 - 00:00

Author: Great Britain, issuing body.
Published: [London] : [Weldon & Co.], [1882]

Currently held at: DUKE

Freedom in Kansas : speech of William H. Seward, in the Senate of the United States, March 3, 1858.

Baskin Collection Additions - Tue, 02/21/2017 - 00:00

Author: Seward, William H. (William Henry), 1801-1872, author.
Published: Washington, D.C. : Buell & Blanchard, printers, 1858.

Currently held at: DUKE

Persama and Medusin

Baskin Collection Additions - Mon, 02/20/2017 - 00:00

Author: Booth, Sabra, artist.
Published: [United States] : [Sabra Booth], 2009.

Currently held at: DUKE

Women in industry.

Baskin Collection Additions - Mon, 02/20/2017 - 00:00

Author: Great Britain. Ministry of Labour and National Service, creator.
Published: [London] : Issued by the Ministry of Labour and National Service, [1945]

Currently held at: DUKE

Windows on Henry Street

Baskin Collection Additions - Mon, 02/20/2017 - 00:00

Author: Wald, Lillian D., 1867-1940, author.
Published: Boston : Little, Brown, and Company, 1934.

Currently held at: DUKE

Twenty years at Hull-house : with autobiographical notes

Baskin Collection Additions - Mon, 02/20/2017 - 00:00

Author: Addams, Jane, 1860-1935, author.
Published: New York : The Macmillan Company, 1911.

Currently held at: DUKE

Autobiography, poems and songs of Ellen Johnston, the 'Factory Girl'.

Baskin Collection Additions - Fri, 02/17/2017 - 00:00

Author: Johnston, Ellen, approximately 1835-1873, author.
Published: Glasgow : William Love, 40 St. Enoch Square, MDCCCLXVII [1867]

Currently held at: DUKE

Women's war work in maintaining the industries & export trade of the United Kingdom : information officially compiled for the use of recruiting officers, military representatives and tribunals.

Baskin Collection Additions - Thu, 02/16/2017 - 00:00

Published: London : Printed under the authority of His Majesty's Stationery Office by the Chiswick Press, Tooks Court, Chancery Lane, E.C., 1916

Currently held at: DUKE

A dialogue concerning women : being a defence of the sex : written to Eugenia.

Baskin Collection Additions - Thu, 02/16/2017 - 00:00

Author: Walsh, William, 1663-1708, author.
Published: London : Printed for R. Bentley in Russel-Street in Covent-Garden, and J. Tonson at the Judge's-Head in Chancery-Lane, 1691.

Currently held at: DUKE

Ideas for Activism in the Time of Trump, featuring Mandy Carter

Rubenstein Library Events - Wed, 02/15/2017 - 17:00
Other (see event description)East Campus

Location: East Duke Parlors

Mandy Carter will speak about understanding the importance of the changing of hearts and minds and the changing of public policy in social justice movements, and how our North Carolina Moral Monday Movement can be a model of a diverse coalition that brings together social justice people to take a stand against the Trump Administration. Mandy Carter has a 50-year movement history of social, racial, and LGBTQA justice organizing since 1967. She is a co-founder of Southerners On New Ground and the National Black Justice Coalition. Her papers are housed at the Bingham Center. Sponsored by Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies and Baldwin Scholars as part of the Gender Wednesday series. Co-sponsored by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture. Lunch will be provided

Optional Facebook RSVP