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A speech on the Garden of Eden, or, Paradise lost and found

Baskin Collection Additions - Thu, 08/11/2016 - 00:00

Author: Woodhull, Victoria C. (Victoria Claflin), 1838-1927, author.
Published: New York : Woodhull & Claflin, 111 Nassau Street, 1876.

Currently held at: DUKE

Spaulding's classical and comical song book : containing the latest compositions.

Baskin Collection Additions - Thu, 08/11/2016 - 00:00

Published: [New York?] : [Spaulding's Classical and Comical Concert Company], [1871?]

Currently held at: DUKE

The Union.

Baskin Collection Additions - Thu, 08/11/2016 - 00:00

Published: London : Sherwood, Gilbert & Piper, 1842-1843

Currently held at: DUKE

Friend of Virtue.

Baskin Collection Additions - Thu, 08/11/2016 - 00:00

Published: Boston : New England Female Moral Reform Society, 1838-1867.

Currently held at: DUKE

Annual Report of the Managers of the Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Delinquents in the City of New York.

Baskin Collection Additions - Thu, 08/11/2016 - 00:00

Author: Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Delinquents in the City of New-York.
Published: New York, N.Y. : Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Delinquents in the City of New-York

Currently held at: DUKE

... Annual Report.

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 08/10/2016 - 00:00

Author: Cecil Houses, Inc.
Published: London : Cecil Houses Women's Public Lodging House Fund, 1928-

Currently held at: DUKE

The spirit of freedom in education

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 08/10/2016 - 00:00

Author: Ferm, Elizabeth Byrne, 1867-1944, author.
Published: Stelton, N.J. : The Modern School, 1919.

Currently held at: DUKE

The modern school

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 08/10/2016 - 00:00

Author: Ferrer Guardia, Francisco, 1859-1909, author.
Published: New York : The Francisco Ferrer Assn., 241 Fifth Avenue, [between 1910 and 1919?]

Currently held at: DUKE

Personal rights and sexual wrongs

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 08/10/2016 - 00:00

Author: Dawson, Oswald, author.
Published: London : Wm. Reeves, 185, Fleet Street ; Leeds : Geo. Cornwell, 4 Upper Mill Hill, 1897.

Currently held at: DUKE

... Annual Report of Miss J.P. Moore's Home for Aged and Destitute Women.

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 08/10/2016 - 00:00

Published: New Orleans : Miss J.P. Moore's Home for Aged and Destitute Women, 1880-

Currently held at: DUKE

Annual report ... of the Women's Trade Union League of New York.

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 08/10/2016 - 00:00

Author: Women's Trade Union League of New York.
Published: New York, N.Y. : Women's Trade Union League of New York

Currently held at: DUKE

Measuring the Children of the Corn

Baskin Test - Tue, 08/09/2016 - 13:15

“The babies are entered like any other exhibit at an agricultural fair. . . . They are examined by judges, just as live stock [sic], grain or apples are examined. . . . The result is bound to be – not prettier babies, – but better babies at each year’s fair, – a stronger, healthier race of people on the farms, in small towns and in the state.”

This excerpt from a Better Babies Bureau circular, from the papers of Victor Bassett, contains several templates for Better Baby Contest advertisements. Popular at local fairs in the early 20th century, Better Baby Contests presented a lighthearted way to challenge infant mortality and promote fitter populations. However, they also reveal governmental eugenic efforts to objectively quantify and thus improve American health.

Announcement for Better Babies Contest.

Examiners judged children under five years old on their measurements and proportions, mental and developmental states, vision and hearing, and physical development. These tests set government-determined averages as the standard by encouraging families to “produce” children who met or exceeded these ideals. Additionally, they served to cement the public health as existing in the realm of scientific medicine and the government, rather than in the home. These kinds of contests illustrate the complex relationship between eugenics, popular movements, and public health.

Thanks to a generous History of Medicine travel grant, my visit to the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library allowed me to conduct research to support my dissertation, “Measuring Health: The United States Sanitary Commission, Statistics, and American Public Health in the Nineteenth Century.” I examine the statistical work of the United States Sanitary Commission (USSC).

During the American Civil War, the USSC attempted to improve the health of the Union Army. The leaders of this organization understood their work as forwarding ideas about preventative medicine and improving sanitation. Yet with the entirety of the Union army at their disposal, the USSC also inspected and measured over one million soldiers and sailors. These records include tabulations not simply of height and weight, but also the distance between a man’s eyes, the size of his head, and angles of his face. The statisticians presented their findings in groups divided by race and education level, and, while they provided limited interpretation of these numbers, they were made available to the broader scientific and anthropologic communities. It was in their hands that these numbers defined medical standards for Americans and shaped the nature of American public health.

My project explores why these statistics were collected and how they were used, and, more broadly, the Commission’s public health legacy. By using these statistics as a starting point, I explore the ties between the USSC and changes in public health, and how research from a 19th century organization continues to impact later public health issues. These Better Baby Contests represent the Commission’s legacy of measuring the quality and usefulness of a human being and of using governmental authority to establish scientific authority.

Post contributed by Sara Kern, a Ph.D. candidate in History & Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Penn State University.

The post Measuring the Children of the Corn appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Measuring the Children of the Corn

Devil's Tale Posts - Tue, 08/09/2016 - 13:15

“The babies are entered like any other exhibit at an agricultural fair. . . . They are examined by judges, just as live stock [sic], grain or apples are examined. . . . The result is bound to be – not prettier babies, – but better babies at each year’s fair, – a stronger, healthier race of people on the farms, in small towns and in the state.”

This excerpt from a Better Babies Bureau circular, from the papers of Victor Bassett, contains several templates for Better Baby Contest advertisements. Popular at local fairs in the early 20th century, Better Baby Contests presented a lighthearted way to challenge infant mortality and promote fitter populations. However, they also reveal governmental eugenic efforts to objectively quantify and thus improve American health.

Announcement for Better Babies Contest.

Examiners judged children under five years old on their measurements and proportions, mental and developmental states, vision and hearing, and physical development. These tests set government-determined averages as the standard by encouraging families to “produce” children who met or exceeded these ideals. Additionally, they served to cement the public health as existing in the realm of scientific medicine and the government, rather than in the home. These kinds of contests illustrate the complex relationship between eugenics, popular movements, and public health.

Thanks to a generous History of Medicine travel grant, my visit to the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library allowed me to conduct research to support my dissertation, “Measuring Health: The United States Sanitary Commission, Statistics, and American Public Health in the Nineteenth Century.” I examine the statistical work of the United States Sanitary Commission (USSC).

During the American Civil War, the USSC attempted to improve the health of the Union Army. The leaders of this organization understood their work as forwarding ideas about preventative medicine and improving sanitation. Yet with the entirety of the Union army at their disposal, the USSC also inspected and measured over one million soldiers and sailors. These records include tabulations not simply of height and weight, but also the distance between a man’s eyes, the size of his head, and angles of his face. The statisticians presented their findings in groups divided by race and education level, and, while they provided limited interpretation of these numbers, they were made available to the broader scientific and anthropologic communities. It was in their hands that these numbers defined medical standards for Americans and shaped the nature of American public health.

My project explores why these statistics were collected and how they were used, and, more broadly, the Commission’s public health legacy. By using these statistics as a starting point, I explore the ties between the USSC and changes in public health, and how research from a 19th century organization continues to impact later public health issues. These Better Baby Contests represent the Commission’s legacy of measuring the quality and usefulness of a human being and of using governmental authority to establish scientific authority.

Post contributed by Sara Kern, a Ph.D. candidate in History & Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Penn State University.

The post Measuring the Children of the Corn appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Measuring the Children of the Corn

History of Medicine Blog - Tue, 08/09/2016 - 13:15

“The babies are entered like any other exhibit at an agricultural fair. . . . They are examined by judges, just as live stock [sic], grain or apples are examined. . . . The result is bound to be – not prettier babies, – but better babies at each year’s fair, – a stronger, healthier race of people on the farms, in small towns and in the state.”

This excerpt from a Better Babies Bureau circular, from the papers of Victor Bassett, contains several templates for Better Baby Contest advertisements. Popular at local fairs in the early 20th century, Better Baby Contests presented a lighthearted way to challenge infant mortality and promote fitter populations. However, they also reveal governmental eugenic efforts to objectively quantify and thus improve American health.

Announcement for Better Babies Contest.

Examiners judged children under five years old on their measurements and proportions, mental and developmental states, vision and hearing, and physical development. These tests set government-determined averages as the standard by encouraging families to “produce” children who met or exceeded these ideals. Additionally, they served to cement the public health as existing in the realm of scientific medicine and the government, rather than in the home. These kinds of contests illustrate the complex relationship between eugenics, popular movements, and public health.

Thanks to a generous History of Medicine travel grant, my visit to the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library allowed me to conduct research to support my dissertation, “Measuring Health: The United States Sanitary Commission, Statistics, and American Public Health in the Nineteenth Century.” I examine the statistical work of the United States Sanitary Commission (USSC).

During the American Civil War, the USSC attempted to improve the health of the Union Army. The leaders of this organization understood their work as forwarding ideas about preventative medicine and improving sanitation. Yet with the entirety of the Union army at their disposal, the USSC also inspected and measured over one million soldiers and sailors. These records include tabulations not simply of height and weight, but also the distance between a man’s eyes, the size of his head, and angles of his face. The statisticians presented their findings in groups divided by race and education level, and, while they provided limited interpretation of these numbers, they were made available to the broader scientific and anthropologic communities. It was in their hands that these numbers defined medical standards for Americans and shaped the nature of American public health.

My project explores why these statistics were collected and how they were used, and, more broadly, the Commission’s public health legacy. By using these statistics as a starting point, I explore the ties between the USSC and changes in public health, and how research from a 19th century organization continues to impact later public health issues. These Better Baby Contests represent the Commission’s legacy of measuring the quality and usefulness of a human being and of using governmental authority to establish scientific authority.

Post contributed by Sara Kern, a Ph.D. candidate in History & Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Penn State University.

The post Measuring the Children of the Corn appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Report of the ... Annual Convention of the Michigan Equal Suffrage Association.

Baskin Collection Additions - Tue, 08/09/2016 - 00:00

Author: Michigan Equal Suffrage Association.
Published: Charlotte, Mich., [etc.] : Michigan Equal Suffrage Association

Currently held at: DUKE

Report of the Association for the Advancement of Women.

Baskin Collection Additions - Tue, 08/09/2016 - 00:00

Author: Association for the Advancement of Women.
Published: Boston : Association for the Advancement of Women

Currently held at: DUKE

La femme au XIXe siècle

Baskin Collection Additions - Tue, 08/09/2016 - 00:00

Author: Pelletan, Eugène, 1813-1884, author.
Published: Paris : Librairie Pagnerre, 18, rue de Seine, 1869.

Currently held at: DUKE

The Home Guardian.

Baskin Collection Additions - Tue, 08/09/2016 - 00:00

Published: Boston : New England Female Moral Reform Society

Currently held at: DUKE

The Mothers' journal, and family visitant.

Baskin Collection Additions - Tue, 08/09/2016 - 00:00

Published: New York : Bennett, Backus, & Hawley, 1843-

Currently held at: DUKE

More ways than one : a comedy, in five acts

Baskin Collection Additions - Tue, 08/09/2016 - 00:00

Author: Cowley, Hannah, 1743-1809, author.
Published: Boston : Printed by Russell and Cutler, for John West, No. 75, Cornhill, 1806.

Currently held at: DUKE

Pages

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