Seven passages to a flight

Baskin Collection Additions - Thu, 04/06/2017 - 00:00

Author: Ringgold, Faith, artist.
Published: San Diego, California : Brighton Press, 1995.

Currently held at: DUKE

Technology, Hope, and Motherhood: What We Can Learn from the History of the Infant Incubator

Baskin Test - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 17:37

Date: Tuesday, April 11, 2017
Time: 5:00 p.m.
Location: Rubenstein Library Room 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)

Dr. Jeffrey Baker

Join the Trent History of Medicine Lecture Series for our next talk by Jeff Baker, M.D., Ph.D., on Technology, Hope, and Motherhood:  What We Can Learn from the History of the Infant Incubator. At the turn of the last century, a new medical invention known as the infant incubator captured the imagination of physicians and the public.   The device became a public sensation and appeared in settings ranging from hospitals to world fairs midway side-shows (complete with live infants).   But in the process it set off a great controversy regarding whether so-called premature and weak infants should be rescued in the first place, and whether their care should be entrusted to mothers, physicians, or scientifically-trained nurses.

Dr. Baker is the Director of the Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities & History of Medicine and Professor of Pediatrics in the School of Medicine at Duke University. He is the author of The machine in the nursery : incubator technology and the origins of newborn intensive care (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996) and a leading authority on the history of neonatal medicine.

The talk will be held in the Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room, Room 153, of the Rubenstein Library at Duke University. All are welcome to attend.  Sponsored by the History of Medicine Collections.

The post Technology, Hope, and Motherhood: What We Can Learn from the History of the Infant Incubator appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Technology, Hope, and Motherhood: What We Can Learn from the History of the Infant Incubator

Devil's Tale Posts - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 17:37

Date: Tuesday, April 11, 2017
Time: 5:00 p.m.
Location: Rubenstein Library Room 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)

Dr. Jeffrey Baker

Join the Trent History of Medicine Lecture Series for our next talk by Jeff Baker, M.D., Ph.D., on Technology, Hope, and Motherhood:  What We Can Learn from the History of the Infant Incubator. At the turn of the last century, a new medical invention known as the infant incubator captured the imagination of physicians and the public.   The device became a public sensation and appeared in settings ranging from hospitals to world fairs midway side-shows (complete with live infants).   But in the process it set off a great controversy regarding whether so-called premature and weak infants should be rescued in the first place, and whether their care should be entrusted to mothers, physicians, or scientifically-trained nurses.

Dr. Baker is the Director of the Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities & History of Medicine and Professor of Pediatrics in the School of Medicine at Duke University. He is the author of The machine in the nursery : incubator technology and the origins of newborn intensive care (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996) and a leading authority on the history of neonatal medicine.

The talk will be held in the Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room, Room 153, of the Rubenstein Library at Duke University. All are welcome to attend.  Sponsored by the History of Medicine Collections.

The post Technology, Hope, and Motherhood: What We Can Learn from the History of the Infant Incubator appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Technology, Hope, and Motherhood: What We Can Learn from the History of the Infant Incubator

History of Medicine Blog - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 17:37

Date: Tuesday, April 11, 2017
Time: 5:00 p.m.
Location: Rubenstein Library Room 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)

Dr. Jeffrey Baker

Join the Trent History of Medicine Lecture Series for our next talk by Jeff Baker, M.D., Ph.D., on Technology, Hope, and Motherhood:  What We Can Learn from the History of the Infant Incubator. At the turn of the last century, a new medical invention known as the infant incubator captured the imagination of physicians and the public.   The device became a public sensation and appeared in settings ranging from hospitals to world fairs midway side-shows (complete with live infants).   But in the process it set off a great controversy regarding whether so-called premature and weak infants should be rescued in the first place, and whether their care should be entrusted to mothers, physicians, or scientifically-trained nurses.

Dr. Baker is the Director of the Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities & History of Medicine and Professor of Pediatrics in the School of Medicine at Duke University. He is the author of The machine in the nursery : incubator technology and the origins of newborn intensive care (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996) and a leading authority on the history of neonatal medicine.

The talk will be held in the Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room, Room 153, of the Rubenstein Library at Duke University. All are welcome to attend.  Sponsored by the History of Medicine Collections.

The post Technology, Hope, and Motherhood: What We Can Learn from the History of the Infant Incubator appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

The Best of DC.

Tech Services - New Books and Serials - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 04:00
1979-1986

A Sound Mind in a Sound Body

Current Exhibits - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 02:32

The items in the exhibit trace the history of medical advice written specifically for scholars and students and reflect the wide range of approaches to scholarly health.

Royal India & The British

Current Exhibits - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 02:23

This exhibition focuses on the architecture of the Mughal Emperors and on Maharajas, indigenous Indian rulers, photographed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by an Englishman, Samuel Bourne, and an Indian, Raja Lala Deen Dayal.

Wages and the family

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 00:00

Author: Douglas, Paul H. (Paul Howard), 1892-1976, author.
Published: Chicago, Illinois : University of Chicago Press, [1927]

Currently held at: DUKE

The cry for justice : an anthology of the literature of social protest

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 00:00

Published: Pasadena, California : Published by Upton Sinclair, 1921.

Currently held at: DUKE

Certain dangerous tendencies in American life : and other papers.

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 00:00

Author: Harrison, Jonathan Baxter, 1835-1907, author.
Published: Boston : Houghton, Osgood and Company ; Cambridge : The Riverside Press, 1880.

Currently held at: DUKE

Nature's aristocracy, or, Battles and wounds in time of peace : a plea for the oppressed

Baskin Collection Additions - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 00:00

Author: Collins, Jennie, author.
Published: Boston : Lee and Shepard, Publishers ; New York : Lee, Shepard, and Dillingham, 1871.

Currently held at: DUKE

Pearl S. Buck letter to Frances Perkins, 1939 May 24.

Baskin Collection Additions - Tue, 04/04/2017 - 00:00

Author: Buck, Pearl S. (Pearl Sydenstricker), 1892-1973, correspondent.

Currently held at: DUKE

A Sound Mind in a Sound Body: Health Advice for Scholars and Students

Baskin Test - Mon, 04/03/2017 - 15:49
Calvin Cutter. A Treatise on Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene: Designed for Colleges, Academies, and Families. Philadelphia, 1852.

“It is an old complaint,” wrote the eighteenth-century Swiss physician Samuel-André-Auguste-David Tissot, “that study, though essentially necessary to the mind, is hurtful to the body.” Student health is the subject of a new exhibit entitled “A Sound Mind in a Sound Body: Health Advice for Scholars and Students,” now on display in the Josiah Charles Trent History of Medicine Room.

Title page to Thomas Cogan. The Haven of Health… London, 1612.

Since antiquity, scholars and students have been bombarded with warnings about the potential health hazards associated with a life of sedentary study, the medical side effects of which have been said to range from a loss of vision, cramped posture, and consumption to melancholia, bad digestion, and even hemorrhoids. Heeding these warnings, scholars and students have for centuries turned to medical guides for advice on how best to counteract the effects of “hard study.” While such guides often vary as to specifics, all commend some form of attention to diet, exercise, and regimen as means to a long and healthy life, urging adherence to an ancient ideal: mens sana in corpore sano, a sound mind in a sound body.

“Health and Strength,” Wilbur Wade Card Papers, Duke University Archives, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

The items in the exhibit trace the history of medical advice written specifically for scholars and students and reflect the wide range of approaches to scholarly health.  The exhibit, on display in the Josiah Charles Trent History of Medicine Room, runs through July 16, 2017.

A Sound Mind in a Sound Body is curated by Thomas Gillan, Josiah Charles Trent History of Medicine Intern

The post A Sound Mind in a Sound Body: Health Advice for Scholars and Students appeared first on The Devil's Tale.