Mary Lily Research Grant Recipients

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

2014-2015

Dr. Georgina Colby, linguistics and cultural studies, University of Westminster, for a book on Kathy Acker combining philosophical analysis with literary and critical theory, exploring connections between feminist theory, Acker’s use of philosophy, and her experimental writing practices.

Dr. Donna Drucker, civil and environmental engineering, Technische Universität Darmstadt, for a journal article on sexual behavior and the science of contraceptive testing in the mid-twentieth century United States.

Sara Mameni, Ph.D. candidate, visual arts, University of California, San Diego, for dissertation research on Iran-US relations in the 1960s and 1970s—leading up to Iran’s Islamic Revolution of 1979—through the lens of queer theory, feminist theory, and postcolonial studies.

Ivy McIntyre, Ph.D. candidate, history, St. Louis University, for dissertation research on South Carolina families in times of personal crisis in the early Republic.

Andrew Pope, Ph.D. candidate, history, Harvard University, for dissertation research on radical social movements and the New South in Georgia from 1968-1996.

Dr. Jason Scott, Dr. Annalisa Castaldo, and Jennifer Lynn Pollitt, for an edited collection of essays looking at how kink identities, behaviors, and lifestyles are represented in popular and cultural studies.

Mairead Sullivan, Ph.D. candidate, women’s, gender, and sexuality studies, Emory University, for dissertation research on questions of breastedness in feminist and queer theory.

Hope Tucker, independent scholar, for an artist’s video on the fragility of reproductive rights in the American South, as seen through the work of those who documented and labored for these rights in the second half of the twentieth century.

2013-2014

Valerie Behrer, Ph.D. candidate, English, University of Minnesota, for dissertation research on the connections between girls’ subjectivities, autobiographical practices and the development of American radical feminism from the late 1960s to the 1970s.

Erin Leigh Durban-Albrecht, Ph.D. candidate, gender & women’s studies, University of Arizona, for a set of related projects — including a film and her dissertation — that use Kathy Acker’s Kathy Goes to Haiti to explore racialized gender and sexuality, cultural production and U.S.‐Haiti relations in the 20th and early 21st century.

Lauren Gutterman, Center for Gender and Sexuality Law, Columbia Law School, for a book that will examine the personal experiences and public representation of American wives who desired women from 1945 to 1979.

Monica Miller, Ph.D. candidate, English and women’s & gender Studies, Louisiana State University, for dissertation research on the use of ugly women as characters that defy the stereotype of the beautiful belle in the work of 20th-century southern women writers.

Michelle Pronovost, Master’s student,  Fashion Institute of Technology, for research on the confrontational fashion of riot grrrls in zines from the 1990s.

Andrea Walton, associate professor, Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Indiana University-Bloomington, for research supporting an article and book chapter on philanthropist Eleanor Thomas Elliott.

Kelly Weber, Ph.D. candidate, history, Rice University, for dissertation research related to the politics of daughterhood in the New South from 1880 to 1920.

Stacy J. Williams, Ph.D. candidate, sociology, University of California, San Diego, for dissertation research on how social movements have affected feminist discourse about cooking from 1874 to 2013.

Mary Ziegler, assistant professor, Florida State University College of Law, for a book about how abortion providers helped define lay understandings of the constitutional, statutory and common law concerning abortion in the United States.

2012-2013

Bridget Collins, history of science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, for dissertation research on how American women prevented and treated infectious disease in 20th-century homes.

Laura Foxworth, history, University of South Carolina, for dissertation research on Southern Baptist reactions to women’s movement in the 1970s. (Read more about her research: "The Spiritual is Political" on the Rubenstein Library blog.)

Andrea M. Holliger-Soles, English literature, University of Kentucky, for dissertation research on the ideology and culture of domestic service and slavery in the United States.

Emma M. Howes, English, University of Massachusetts Amherst, for dissertation research examining literacy among Appalachian female mill workers in the Carolina Piedmont from 1880-1920.

Jessica Lancia, American history, University of Florida, for dissertation research on the transnational dimensions of the women’s liberation movement of the 1970s in the United States. (Read more about her research in the Fall 2012 issue of Women at the Center: "Profiles in Research: Jessica Lancia.")

Jane Shattuck Mayer, childhood studies, Rutgers University-Camden, for research on her dissertation which looks at 19th-century New England girlhood and education and its influence on authors of children’s literature.


Dorothy Quincy Thomas, independent scholar, for research on a book that explores progressive women’s identity and sense of self throughout American history by examining three generations of women in her family.

Kimberly Wilmot Voss, assistant professor, University of Central Florida, Nicholson School of Communication, for research on an article about how Robin Morgan worked with female journalists at mainstream newspapers.

2011-2012

Marika Cifor, Master's student, history and library and information science, Simmons College, for master's thesis research that examines historical relationships of lesbians and prostitutes in the United States from 1869-1969.

Jessica Frazier, Ph.D. candidate, history, Binghamton University, for dissertation research on Vietnamese militiawomen and the interconnections of empire, race and gender in the feminist movement from 1965-1980.

Choonib Lee, Ph.D. candidate, history, State University of New York at Stony Brook, for dissertation research on militant women in the new left and civil rights movements in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

La Shonda Mims, Ph.D. candidate, history, University of Georgia, for dissertation research on lesbian community and identity in the cities of Charlotte, N.C., and Atlanta, Ga., from WWII to the present.

Jennifer Nelson, associate professor, women's and gender Studies, University of Redland, for a book on community health reform movements from the mid-1960s to the present.

Ally Nevarez, Master's student, book arts and library and information science, University of Alabama, for an artists' book that highlights the important role that women have in contributing to community and preserving culture.

Rose Norman, Professor Emeritus of English, University of Alabama at Huntsville, for research on lesbian feminist activism in the South from 1965-1985.

Robin Robinson, associate professor, sociology/crime and justice studies, University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, for a book and article on transportation and transformation of female convicts as unfree labor in Colonial America.

Emily Thuma, Ph.D. candidate, American studies, New York University, for research on feminist anti-incarceration activism in the 1970s and 1980s.

Elizabeth York
, associate professor, Music Therapy, Converse College, for research on Atlanta women's music and culture from 1976-1986.

2010-2011

Katie Anania, art history, University of Texas-Austin, for dissertation research on the rise of feminism as a framework for evaluating contemporary art.

Lori Brown, architecture, Syracuse University, for research for a book examining the relationships between space, abortion and issues of access.

Kate Eichhorn, culture and media studies, The New School, for research comparing zines and scrapbooks as archival collections of ephemera.

Julie Enszer, women’s studies, University of Maryland, for an examination of lesbian-feminist print culture in Durham, N.C., from 1969-1989 as part of a historical narrative of lesbian-feminist publishing. (Read more about Enszer's research: "What She Wore" on the Rubenstein Library's blog.)

Karen Garner, historical studies, SUNY Empire State College, for an examination of U.S. global gender policy in the 1990s.

Rebecca Mitchell, English, University of Texas – Pan American, for research for an article examining the proto-feminist aspects and eroticism of Victorian mourning attire.

Michelle Moravec, history and women’s studies, Rosemont College, for research on feminist art activism as a U.S. social movement from 1967-1991.

Whitney Strub, women’s studies and American studies, Temple University, for research for a book examining the relationships between queer sexuality, LGBT activism and antigay activity in post-WWII United States.

2009-2010

Katherine McVane Armstrong, Ph.D. candidate, history, Emory University, for dissertation research on the cultural pressures and standards that influenced the grieving process of southern elite women following the death of a child.

Melissa Estes Blair, lecturer, history, University of Georgia, for research for a book examining the role of women's organizations in Denver, Durham and Indianapolis from 1960-1980 in forming activist communities.

Caroline Kaltefleiter
, associate professor, State University of New York-Cortland, for research expansion on a book about the emergence of the Riot Grrrl movement, transgender activism and Third Wave feminism.

Jessica Lingel, independent scholar, for research on a collection of essays about American 20th-century women writers' experiences with medical trauma and how illness impacted their writing and art.

Jeannie Ludlow, assistant professor, English and women's studies, Eastern Illinois University, for research on an article and conference presentation about the political and sociocultural evolution of abortion and reproductive rights discourse during the past 40 years of the women’s movement.

Ailecia Ruscin, Ph.D. candidate, American studies, University of Kansas, for dissertation research on the fan culture of riot grrrls across the United States and its influence on the production of zines — as well as films, photographs and records.

Denise Shaw, assistant professor, English and women's studies, University of South Carolina, for research on a book about the social and cultural constraints upon a single mother and her daughter, Virginia and Julia May, faced in the first half of the twentieth century.

Mary Tasillo, independent scholar, for creation of a zine and other publication about Third Wave feminism and women's self-production based on an exploration of text and image relationships within artists' books and zines.

Jamie Schmidt Wagman
, Ph.D. candidate, American studies, Saint Louis University, for dissertation research on production and consumption relating to birth control devices from 1958 to today, with particular focus on public attitudes towards contraception revealed in feminist writings, zines and advertisements.

2008-2009

Agatha Beins, women’s and gender Studies, Rutgers University, for dissertation research on the role of feminist newsletters and newspapers in unifying and enabling the feminist movement of the 1970s.

Lindsey Churchill, history, Florida State University, for dissertation research on the intersections, as well as the points of contention, between U.S. radicals and Latin American revolutionaries in the 1960s-1980s.

Breanne Fahs, women’s studies, Arizona State University, for research for a book documenting the life of radical feminist Valerie Solanas in the context of early radical feminism and underground feminist publishing.

Jennifer Gilley, University Libraries, Pennsylvania State University, for research for a book chronicling both the history of U.S. feminist presses and the publication history of “feminist bestsellers,” including Kate Millett’s Sexual Politics, Robin Morgan’s anthology Sisterhood is Powerful and Alix Kates Shulman’s Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen.

Margaret Henderson
, Arts Ipswich Program, University of Queensland, Australia, for research for a book on Kathy Acker’s work in relation to feminist and postmodern theories of literature, culture and capitalism.

Emily Hoeflinger
, English, Texas A&M University, for dissertation research on the existence of a third-wave terminology in the writings of zines and the impact of these texts on outside literary genres, particularly "Chick Lit" and women’s experimental writing of the 1960s-1990s.

Ronald D. Lankford, independent scholar, for research on a book-length study of feminist issues in the rock music of women singer-songwriters during the 1990s.

Jessica Lee, history, University of Washington, for dissertation research on the intricate relationship between the development of radical feminism and women’s involvement in higher education.

Olga Trokhimenko, foreign languages and literatures, University of North Carolina-Wilmington, for the preparation and expansion of a book-length manuscript on the cultural meanings of women’s laughter and smiling in medieval German tradition.

2007-2008

David Brown, lecturer, School of Arts, Histories, and Cultures, Manchester University, U.K., for work on a book on working class, non-slaveholding whites in the antebellum American South.

Lindsey Churchill, Department of History, Florida State University, for work on her dissertation on gender and the connection between Latin American and U.S. leftist revolutionary groups.

Jason Demers, Programme in English, York University, Canada, for work on his dissertation on Kathy Acker and French post-structuralist theory and American postmodernist writing.

LaShawn Harris, Department of History, Howard University, for work on an article about the political and social activism of Mittie Maude Lena Gordon during the 1930s.

Karissa Haugeberg, Department of History, University of Iowa, for work on her dissertation on women in the anti-abortion movement in the United States from 1970-2000.

Tameka Hobbes, Valentine Richmond History Center, Virginia, for research for a permanent museum exhibition on the city of Richmond.

Heather Murray, lecturer, Department of History, University of Ottawa, Canada, for work on a book on the relationships between gay men and lesbians and their parents in the United States in the post-WWII period.

Renée Sentilles, associate professor, Department of History, Case Western Reserve University, for work on a book on the cultural depiction of American tomboys from 1830-1920.

David Valone, assistant professor, Department of History, Quinnipiac University, for work on an article on the intersection between population control and women's health movements from the 1960s-1990s.

2006-2007

Samantha Barbas, visiting assistant professor, Department of History, University of California at Berkeley, for work on a book about the life and career of Gloria Steinem and her involvement in the women's movement in the 1970s-1990s.

Elizabeth Bishop, adjunct lecturer, Department of History, University of North Carolina-Wilmington, for work on a book and an article about access to abortion and women's citizenship in the USSR and Arab states from 1930-1980.

Lyz Bly, Department of History, Case Western Reserve University,for work on her dissertation on connections between Second Wave radical feminism and the Third Wave Riot Grrrl Movement.

Janet Davidson, Cape Fear Museum of History and Science in Wilmington, NC, for work on an exhibition about women's lives in the Lower Cape Fear before 1900.

Katarina Keane, Department of History, University of Maryland, for work on her dissertation on feminist activism in the American South from 1960s-1970s.

Sarah Maitland, for work on a book about zines written by women and women-identified people from 1990-2005.

Kevin O'Neill, English Studies, University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland, for work on his dissertation examining plagiarism, authorship and autobiography in the work of author Kathy Acker.

Doreen Piano, Assistant Professor, English Dept., University of New Orleans, for work on a book about the production, distribution and reception of independent "Do-It-Yourself" publications.

2005-2006

Lisa Diedrich, Assistant Professor, Women's Studies Program, Stony Brook University, for work on an article about the continuities between the women's health movement in the 1970s and AIDS activism in the U.S. in the 1980s.

Eric Gardner, Associate Professor, Department of English, Saginaw Valley State University, for work on an article about Mary Wager Fisher and the African American literary community in Washington, D.C.

Kimberly Hamlin, Department of American Studies, University of Texas at Austin, for work on her dissertation, which examines the impact of Darwin and evolutionary discourse on gender and feminist thought in the U.S., 1870-1925.

Victoria Hesford, lecturer, Women's Studies Program, Stony Brook University, for work on a book about the feminist as lesbian and the second wave women's movement, 1968-1974.

Alison Piepmeier, senior lecturer, Women's Studies Program, Vanderbilt University, for work on an article that examines third wave feminist zines and corporate culture.

Heather Prescott, Professor, History Department, Central Connecticut State University, for work on a book about the development of health services at institutions of higher education in the U.S. from the early 1800s to the present.

Kijua Sanders-McMurtry, Department of Educational Policy Studies, Georgia State University, for work on her dissertation about the Links, a black women's service organization.

Sarah Stanton, Department of Women's Studies, Emory University, for work on her dissertation on women's queer identities in the post-Stonewall U.S. South.


[No grants awarded 2003-2004]

2002-2003

Bebe Barefoot, Department of English, University of Alabama, for work on her dissertation "The (Trans)Portable Acker, an experimental biography of avant-garde author Kathy Acker."

Brandi Brimmer, Department of History, UCLA, for work on her dissertation Gender and the Politics of Widow's Pension Claims which explores the ways poor black women used the military pension system to shape social welfare policies.

Susan Ferentinos, Department of History, Indiana University, for work on her dissertation "An Unpredictable Age: Sex, Consumption, and the Emergence of the American Teenager, 1910-1950."

Debra Herbenick, The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction, for work on a book which explores the history of language used regarding women's sexuality and reproductive health.

Catherine Jones, Department of History, Johns Hopkins University, for work on her dissertation on the expansion of public education and the experiences of African-American and white women teachers in the post-Civil War South.

Nancy Unger
, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Santa Clara University, for work on a book tentatively titled Beyond Nature's Housekeepers: Gender and American Women in Environmental History.

Linda Wayne, Women's Studies Department, University of Minnesota, for work on her dissertation "Sexualities: From Second to Third Wave Feminism."

Dona Yarbrough, Department of English, University of Virginia, for work on her dissertation "Real Queer: Sapphic Modernity and American Realism" which examines precursors to the lesbian pulp literature of the 1950s and 1960s.

2001-2002

Janni Linda Aragon, Department of Political Science, University of California at Riverside, for work on her dissertation "Movement Into the Academy: Second Wave Feminism and Political Science."

Ruth L. Fairbanks
, Department of History, University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaigne, for work on her dissertation "Pregnant Workers: Women's Jobs, Women's Bodies, Welfare and Equality, 1940-1993."

Judith E. Harper, independent scholar, for work on her book An Encyclopedia of Women During the Civil War.

Carla Harryman, Senior Lecturer, Department of English, Wayne State University, for work on an article on Kathy Acker's poetics. This article will be included as a chapter in a book proposal about Acker's writings. The volume is currently under consideration by several university presses.

Anne K. Huebel, Department of History, University of Minnesota, for work on her dissertation "More Than an Individual: British Thoughts on Motherhood from the 1830s to WWI."

Karen Leroux, Department of History, Northwestern University, for work on her dissertation "Servants of Democracy: Women's Work in U.S. Public Education, 1866-1902."

Jennifer Meares, Department of History, Emory University, for work on her dissertation which examines the changing boundaries of rudeness and gentility in Hancock County, Georgia, between the advent of the cotton gin in 1793 and the eve of the Civil War in 1860.

Linda Veltze, Professor, Department of Library Science, Appalachian State University, for research supporting a project which shows how the slave owning family of Rev. Richard W. Barber (of Wilkes, NC) influenced the life of the slave Judith Barber, and vice versa, and how the descendents of the two interpret and live out the consequences of this history.

2000-2001

Elizabeth B. Boyd, American Studies Department, University of Texas at Austin, for research on her dissertation, Southern Beauty. Performing Femininity in an American Region.

Shawn D. Kimmel, Program in American Culture, University of Michigan, for research on his dissertation, "Social & Cultural History of Domesticity & Philanthropy in the Nineteenth Century U.S."

Anna M. Lawrence, Department of History, University of Michigan, for research on her dissertation, "Gender and Revolution in Early Methodist England and America, 1734-1820."

Seulky Shin, Department of History, University of Minnesota, for research on her dissertation exploring the connection between ideas about marriage (and family) in the South and the rise of intense nativism and nationalist rhetoric from 1880 to 1920 in the United States.

Jan S. Stennette, Assistant Professor, History Department, East Carolina University, for research on an article and eventual book chapter exploring the role of labor and African American women during and immediately following Reconstruction: 1865 to 1871. [Professor Stennette will also receive support for this project from Duke's John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African-American Documentation.]

Cheryl A. Wells, Department of History, University of South Carolina, for research on her dissertation, "Women: Gender, Time, and the Civil War."

Kirsten E. Wood, Assistant Professor, History Department, Florida International University, for research on her book, Slaveholding Widowhood, Gender, Class, and Power in the Southeast, 1790-1860.

1999-2000

Maria R. Bevacqua, Assistant Professor of Women's Studies, Emory University for her book, Rape on the Public Agenda: Feminism, Consciousness, and the Politics of Sexual Assault.

Lorraine K. Gates, Ph.D. candidate, Corcoran Department of History, the University of Virginia, for her dissertation, "The Weight of Their Votes: Southern Women and Politics in the 1920s."

Jennifer L. Gross, Ph.D. candidate, Department of History, the University of Georgia, for her dissertation, "'Good Angels' or Dangerous Women: Confederate Widowhood in the Postbellum South."

Michael Hardin, instructor, English Department, Houston Community College, for several projects related to the work of Kathy Acker. These will include a chapter in the essay collection, Devouring Institutions: The Life Work of Kathy Acker, edited by Hardin; an article investigating Acker's unpublished work and why she chose not to publish it; and possibly an effort to have some of this work published posthumously.

Deborah A. Lee, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Cultural Studies, George Mason University, for her case study of the elite white Virginians Ann Randolph Meade Page (1781-1838), her cousin, Mary Fitzhugh Custis, and her younger brother, William Meade, who worked together to end slavery and ameliorate its conditions.

Lucia McMahon, Ph.D. candidate, Department of History, Rutgers University, for her dissertation "'Beings Endowed with Reason': Gender, Individualism, and Education in the Early Republic."

Sarah Pearsall, Ph.D. candidate, Department of History, Harvard University, for her dissertation, "'After All These Revolutions': Family Correspondence from the British-Atlantic World, 1760-1812."