News & Events

From the Underground to the Archive in Ten Years: Girl Zines, Feminist Networks, and the Politics of Memory


Janice Radway, Northwestern University

Thursday, December 10, 6:00 p.m.
National  Humanities Center, 
7 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC

In the early nineties, a certain cohort of dissident, non-conforming girls turned to self-publishing to express their deep dissatisfaction with conservative reaffirmations of normative femininity. Calling themselves “Riot Grrrls” after several influential all-girl punk bands, they crafted handmade publications known as “zines” in order to voice their disaffection and to think through alternative ways of being in the world. Despite their own fairly small numbers and the fact that they reproduced their zines in limited fashion, these young women quickly caught the attention of the mainstream media, cultural commentators, and a range of academics and librarians alike. Within ten years, at least three major collections of girl zines had been collected at places like Smith College, Barnard College, and Duke University. This lecture will explore the significance of girls’ self-publishing efforts, the complex reasons for their zines’ quick assimilation into legitimate cultural institutions, and the political benefits and drawbacks to this kind of memorialization. 

Janice Radway is the Walter Dill Scott Professor of Communication Studies and a professor of American Studies and Gender and Sexuality Studies at Northwestern University. She is also Professor Emerita of Literature at Duke University. This year, as the Founders’ Fellow at the National Humanities Center, she is working on a book project, Girls and Their Zines in Motion: Selfhood and Sociality in the 1990s.

Past Events

Women at Duke Wikipedia Edit-a-thon


Wednesday, March 25, 2015, 10:00am-2:00pm
The Edge Workshop Room, Bostock Library, First Floor
More details and R.S.V.P. on our meetup page.

Please join us for an opportunity to learn how to edit Wikipedia articles, learn more about the rich history of women at Duke University, and then put that knowledge into action by creating and editing entries that document the lives and contributions of women alumnae, faculty, staff, and community members. This event is part of a worldwide movement to increase the percentage of women editors and woman-focused articles within Wikipedia. Bring your laptop if you can, and create an account in advance. You can also participate from anywhere in the world! Co-sponsored with Duke University Archives and the Duke Women's Center. 

Envisioning the Future of the Sallie Bingham Center

Remarks from the Bingham Center's 25th anniversary celebration held in March 2014 are available on a new website. The Bingham Center hosted an evening with author, playwright, teacher, and feminist activist, Sallie Bingham (pictured left), who reflected on 25 years of documenting women’s history at Duke and offer her vision for the Center’s next 25 years, and Rachel Seidman, Associate Director, Southern Oral History Program, at UNC-Chapel Hill and visiting lecturer in Women’s Studies at Duke University, who gave her perspective on Bingham Center contributions to preservation, teaching, and activism. Deborah Jakubs, Rita DiGiallonardo Holloway University Librarian & Vice Provost for Library Affairs, and Robert L. Byrd, Associate University Librarian for Collections and User Services, gave introductory remarks. Read more