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Guide to the William Bell Photographs, 1872

Abstract

William Bell was a photographer from Philadelphia. He was employed in 1872 by the U.S. Geographical and Geological Explorations and Surveys West of the 100th Meridian, a United States Army survey team.

Collection includes sixteen gold-toned albumen prints, printed from negatives made by William Bell on the Wheeler Expedition of 1872. Fourteen photographs are from Arizona, two from Utah. Primary subjects include landscapes of the Grand Canyon and Colorado River. Some of Bell's photographs from this expedition were used for prints in George M. Wheeler's Report Upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian...(Washington: GPO, 1875-1889). In the field Bell prepared his own dry-plate negatives, a photographic process somewhat uncharacteristic for his time. he This process allowed him to store prepared plates longer than his contemporaries, who used wet plates, but would have also increased the exposure times for his plates.

Descriptive Summary

Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University
Creator
Bell, William, 1830-1910
Title
William Bell photographs 1872
Language of Material
English
Extent
1.6 Linear Feet, 16 Items
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

This collection includes sixteen gold-toned, albumen prints, printed from negatives made by William Bell while on the Wheeler Expedition of 1872. Fourteen photographs are from Arizona, and two are from Utah. The primary subjects of this collection are picturesque landscapes made of the Grand Canyon and Colorado River. Some of Bell's photographs from this expedition were used for prints in George M. Wheeler's Report Upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian...(Washington: GPO, 1875-1889). This collection is composed of one series entitled the Wheeler Expedition of 1872 Series.

The government included photographers on western expeditions to make a visual record of the landscape and its inhabitants. The photographs created during these expeditions served to create maps used to plan for the construction of roads and railways; locate natural resources; facilitate future military operations; as well as to collect ethnographic information on and locate Indian tribes. Perhaps most importantly, the commanders of western expeditions used the resulting photographs as a public relations tool to gain support for future expeditions, and to record geological information, the study of which had become a popular science during the period. By the time of their completion, the surveys had explored much of the region between the Great Plains and the Pacific Coast. This recording made Bell and the other western expeditionary photographers some of the earliest participants in America's tradition of documentary photography.

While in the field, Bell utilized a photographic process somewhat uncharacteristic for his time; he prepared his own dry-plate negatives. This process allowed him to store prepared plates longer than his contemporaries, who used wet plates, but would have also increased the exposure times for his plates.

Administrative Information

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 48 business hours in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

All or portions of this collection may be housed off-site in Duke University's Library Service Center. There may be a 48-hour delay in obtaining these materials.

Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the Rubenstein Library to use this collection.

warning Use Restrictions

The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Contents of the Collection

Quotation marks were used to indicate information taken directly from the photographs.

When photographs were identified as Bell's by comparison with negatives held at the National Archives the relevant negative number has been provided.

"No. 1. Cañon of Kanab Wash, Colorado River, Looking South"
8 x 11 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Box WB1 Print WB.P1
"No. 2. Cañon of Kanab Wash, Colorado River, Looking North"
8 x 11 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P2
"No. 3. Cañon of Kanab Wash, Colorado River, Looking South"
8 x 11 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P3
"No. 6. Grand Cañon, Colorado River, Near Paria Creek, Looking West"
8 x 11 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P4
"No. 7. Grand Cañon, Colorado River, Near Paria Creek, Looking West"
8 x 11 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P5
"No. 8. Grand Cañon, Colorado River, Near Paria Creek, Looking East"
8 x 11 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P6
"No. 9. Looking South into the Grand Cañon, Colorado River, Scheavwitz Crossing"
8 x 11 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P7
"No. 10. Rain Sculpture, Salt Creek Cañon, Utah"
8 x 11 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P8
"No. 12. Grand Cañon of the Colorado River, Mouth of Kanab Wash, Looking East"
8 x 11 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P9
"No. 13. Grand Cañon of the Colorado River, Mouth of Kanab Wash, Looking West"
8 x 11 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P10
"No. 15. Limestone Walls, Kanab Wash, Colorado River"
8 x 11 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P11
"No.11, Taylor's Creek Cañon, Kanara"
8 x 11 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P12
"No. 13" (bottom left corner of print) Kanab or Paria Canyon, Arizona. (source: National Archives)
8 x 10.5 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P13 National Archives negative number: 106-WB-590
"No. 32" (bottom left corner of print) Canyon and Headlands of Colorado and Paria Rivers. (source: National Archives)
8 x 10.5 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P14 National Archives negative number: 106-WB-280
No. A. Grand Canyon. Mouth of Kanab Wash Looking East. (source: National Archives)
8 x 10.5 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P15 National Archives Number 106-WB-268
[No. 43.] Panorama. Part of 43. Colorado Plateau. Grand Canyon. (handwritten on front of board)
8 x 10.75 inch print mounted on a 16 x 20 inch board
Print WB.P16 National Archives Number: 106-WB-44

Historical Note

Chronology List

DateEvent(s)
1830Born Liverpool, England
1848Began photographic career working for his brother-in-law's daguerreotype studio in Philadelphia
1872Served as photographer for the Wheeler Survey, West of the 100th Meridian
1910Died in Philadelphia, Pa.

In 1872, William Bell, a photographer from Philadelphia, found employment on a survey team established by the Army and formally titled: "U.S. Geographical and Geological Explorations and Surveys West of the 100th Meridian, under the command of Lieutenant George M. Wheeler." Bell had been hired by Wheeler to replace Timothy O'Sullivan, another expeditionary photographer, who participated in the Wheeler survey of 1871 and returned in 1873.

Perhaps because William Bell participated in only one expedition, a limited amount of biographical information has been recorded for him, and that information is often vague. William Bell has most often been confused with another photographer Dr. William A. Bell (1841-1920) who served on the Palmer Expedition of 1867 for which William Jackson Palmer surveyed a route through the southwest for the Kansas Pacific Railroad.

William Bell may have fought in the US-Mexican War and for the Union in the Civil War.

Some sources have also indicated that William Bell was appointed chief photographer of the Army Medical Museum in Washington, D.C., where he may have made photographs of soldiers wounded in the Civil War.

Subject Headings

Related Material

  • John K. Hillers Photographs, 1871-1889 and undated

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], William Bell Photographs, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Provenance

The William Bell Photographs were received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a purchase in 1972.

These and other photographs by western expeditionary photographers were purchased from Lowdermilk's bookstore in Washington, D.C. prior to its liquidation.

Processing Information

This collection was previously processed by Bill Erwin in 1982. Erwin conducted a great deal of research used to identify photographs made by western expeditionary photographers. Every effort was made to retain both the organization and informational aspects of his work except when they conflicted with more modern practices.

Information folders contain copies of earlier catalog records and bibliographic information for related sources including sources in which these photographs have been published.

Additional folders contain photocopies of photographs annotated by the National Archives, and reference prints made from copy negatives held in this collection.

Processed by Chris Black, November 24, 2004

Encoded by Michael Shumate, Chris Black

Completed August 2006

Accession is described in this finding aid.

Descriptive sources and standards used to create this inventory: DACS, EAD, NCEAD guidelines, and local Style Guide.