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Guide to the Martin Bronfenbrenner Papers, 1939-1995 and undated

Abstract

Economist on the faculty at Duke University.

The professional papers of Martin Bronfenbrenner span the years 1939 to 1995 and consist of correspondence, research files, memoranda, writings (published and unpublished), teaching materials, reprints, clippings, and other papers, relating chiefly to Bronfenbrenner’s research and associations in the field of economics. Topics in his research files, which make up the bulk of the collection, include income distribution theory, economic development, Marxian and radical economics (including New Left economics), labor economics, monetary economics, international economics, trade, Japanese economy and Japanese history. The collection is organized into the following series: Personal Files, Printed Material, Research and Writing Files, and Teaching Material.

Descriptive Summary

Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University
Creator
Bronfenbrenner, Martin, 1914-1997.
Title
Martin Bronfenbrenner papers 1939-1995 and undated
Language of Material
English
Extent
16.2 Linear Feet, Approximately 12,000 Items
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

The professional papers of Martin Bronfenbrenner span the years 1939 to 1995 and consist of correspondence, research files, memoranda, writings (published and unpublished), teaching materials, reprints, clippings, and other papers, relating chiefly to Bronfenbrenner’s research and associations in the field of economics. The collection is organized into the following series: Personal Files, Published Material, Research and Writing Files, and Teaching Material. The Personal Papers Series includes an unpublished autobiography, a family history, and records of Bronfenbrenner's own U.S. loyalty hearings from 1954-1955. Files in the Teaching Material Series chiefly contain syllabi, course notes, and exams dating from Bronfenbrenner's time at Carnegie, Duke, and in Japan, while the Printed Material files mainly house reprints of many of his articles. The Research Files Series, divided into topical subseries, makes up the bulk of the collection, including Bronfenbrenner's research notes, articles, reprints, correspondence, lectures, and drafts of Bronfenbrenner's writings; the materials offer a rich source of unique research material on topics of interest to Bronfenbrenner such as income distribution theory, economic development, Marxian and radical economics (including New Left economics), labor economics, monetary economics, international economics, trade, Japanese economy and Japanese history. The Research Files also contains a subseries of research folders linked to individual economists in whose work Bronfenbrenner had an interest, or with whom he corresponded, or both; names include Adelman, Baumol, Friedman, Leijonhufvud, Minsky, Samuelson, Spengler, Solow, and Viner, with two folders of material on Kei Shibata, who wrote on Marxian economics and economic equilibrium during the 1930s.

Administrative Information

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 48 business hours in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

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Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library to use this collection.

warning Use Restrictions

The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Contents of the Collection

Contains files maintained by Bronfenbrenner which include his unpublished dissertation, curriculum vitae, family correspondence, personal office files, and a family history and family tree from 1977. There are two folders dedicated to Bronfenbrenner's loyalty hearings in 1954 to 1955 when Bronfenbrenner's commitment to the United States was publicly questioned as was his interest in Marxian economics. There is one folder of short humorous poems written by Bronfenbrenner throughout his career, often using the pseudonym "The Beardless Beatnik." Bronfenbrenner's unpublished autobiography is also included in this series.

Correspondence, 1972-1983
Box 1
Doctoral thesis, Monetary theory and general equilibrium, 1939
Box 1
Family history, 1973
Box 1
Loyalty hearing, 1954-1955
(2 folders)
Box 1
Personal office files, 1971-1983
(4 folders)
Box 1
Curriculum vitae, 1977-1982, undated
Box 2
Scurrilous verse, undated
Box 2
Unpublished autobiography, undated
Box 2

Chiefly contains offprints of journal articles and journal issues containing articles by Brofenbrenner. Additionally, there are individual copies of Bronfenbrenner's collection of short stories Tomioko Stories, recalling Bronfenbrenner's time in Japan when it was under American occupation, as well as Is the Business Cycle Obsolete?, edited by Bronfenbrenner. The contents of the boxes are arranged in date order.

Bronfenbrenner reprints and publications
Box 2-5

Representing the main component of the Bronfenbrenner Papers, the series is subdivided into the following subseries: Development, Heterodox Topics, Income Distribution, Orthodox Topics, People, and Japan.

Folders house materials relating to one of Bronfenbrenner's ongoing interests, economic development, focused mainly on developing Asian countries or regions. The files contains notes, speeches, draft and published papers written by Bronfenbrenner, papers written by other authors relevant to Bronfenbrenner's research, relevant correspondence, newspaper articles, and other miscellaneous documents. Arranged alphabetically by original folder title.

China after Mao, 1982-1983
Box 5
Committee for Economic Development: productivity, 1981
Box 5
Development programming, Malaysia, 1969-1973
Box 5
Development profiles: hard and soft development, 1963-1967
Box 5
Exports and foreign capital, 1968, 1979
Box 5
IEA international conference in Tokyo, 1977
Box 5
Indian sub-continent, 1961
Box 5
Indo-China, 1954, 1965
Box 5
Indonesia, 1962
Box 5
Korea, 1963, 1970
Box 5
Mahalanobis model, 1960-1962
(2 folders)
Box 5
NIEO, 1976-1978
Box 5
Notes on foreign aid, 1957
Box 5
Riots and hunger, 1968-1969
Box 6
Slobbovia meets the market, 1990
Box 6
Taiwan, 1969-72
Box 6
Turkey, 1978-1981
Box 6
The terms of convergence, 1982
Box 6
UNESCO paper, 1975
Box 6
United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD): Dependency, 1976-1977
Box 6
USSR: general impressions, 1972, 1975
Box 6
U.S.-USSR relations, 1975-1976
Box 6

Bronfenbrenner conducted research, wrote papers and corresponded on topics which fell outside the range of traditional economic subject areas. In particular, Bronfenbrenner had a career-long interest in the work of Marx, Marxian economics, and radical political economy. While always critical of these approaches to economics, he was a strong proponent of academic freedom and respected Marxist approaches to economic analysis. Other topics include anti-Semitism, Reagonomics, black economics, futurology, and social responsibility. The folders contain notes, speeches, draft and published papers written by Bronfenbrenner, papers written by other authors relevant to Bronfenbrenner's research, correspondence, newspaper articles, and other miscellaneous papers. Ordered alphabetically by original folder title.

Alienation, 1971-1973
Box 6
Anti-economics, 1965, 1972
Box 6
The anti-semite Jew, a useful citizen?, 1966
Box 6
Appeal of confiscation, 1966, undated
Box 6
Baran paper: Academic freedom, 1965-1971, undated
Box 6
Black economics, 1971
Box 6
A Calculus Suicide, 1977
Box 6
Comparative systems, 1972-1979
Box 6
Cooperative democracy: decentralized workers' management, 1969
Box 6
College of H and SS, 1968-1969
Box 6
Disarmament, 1961-1963
Box 7
Do economists matter?, 1975
Box 7
Economics as dentistry, 1991
Box 7
Economics in the near future, 1989
Box 7
Futurology, 1973-1978

[Item removed to Oversize material series.]

Box 7
Hollis and Nell: methodology review, 1975-1977
Box 7
Institutional economics, 1985
Box 7
Labour front, undated
Box 7
MacArthur memorial, 1976-1978, undated
Box 7
Marriage market as a market, 1971-1973
Box 7
Marxist capital consumption ratio, 1966-1968
Box 7
Marxian distribution theory, undated
Box 7
Marxian economics, 1963-1971, 1974
(2 folders)
Box 7
McCarthyism, 1953-1962

[Item removed to Oversize material series.]

Box 7
Meritocracy, 1974
Box 8
Methodology, 1962-1965
Box 8
Miscellaneous essays, 1980, 1985, undated
Box 8
Miscellaneous radicalism, 1969, undated
Box 8
The new American system of political economy, 1989
Box 8
New Left conference, 1973-1974
Box 8
New Left ideology, 1971-1973
Box 8
On Malthusian economics, 1979
Box 8
Poetry, pushpin, utility, 1975, undated
(2 folders)
Box 8
Psychiatric issues, 1953, 1962-1967
Box 8
Quesnayan algebra, 1986, undated
Box 8
Radical political economy, 1968-1971, undated
(3 folders)
Box 8
Reagonomics, 1981, undated
(3 folders)
Box 9
Revival of rationing/economic stagnation, 1964-1969, undated
Box 9
Revolutions in economic thought, 1966-1970
Box 9
Roosevelt on economic humanism and market socialism, 1969-1971
Box 9
Schumpeter, 1980
Box 9
Short essays, miscellaneous topics, 1980-1981, undated
Box 9
Socialist designs, 1977
Box 9
Social responsibility of business/ugly corporate America
Box 9
Statistical anti-semitism, Jewish and Gentile, 1966, undated
Box 9
Student indiscipline, 1968-1970
(2 folders)

[Item removed to Oversize material series.]

Box 9
Technological change, 1966, undated
Box 9
Tenure, 1971-1976
Box 9
U.S. economic ideology, 1957-1958, 1977, undated
Box 9
Vicissitudes of Marxian economics, 1970
Box 10
Welfare state, 1975-1976
Box 10
What the radical economists are saying, 1973, undated
Box 10
Why Johnny can't think straight, 1982, undated
Box 10

Bronfenbrenner's interest and research in income distribution spanned his entire professional career. Folders contain notes, speeches, drafts and publications written by Bronfenbrenner, papers written by others, correspondence, clippings, and other miscellaneous documents. Arranged alphabetically by original folder title.

Alternative approaches, 1970s, 1980s
(2 folders)
Box 10
American inequality, 1970s, 1980s
Box 10
Automation, 1964
Box 10
Corrections on income distribution theory, 1960s, 1970s
(2 folders)
Box 10
Economic growth, 1959
Box 10
Ethical issues, 1960s, 1970s
(2 folders)
Box 10
Ethics and justice, 1970s
Box 11
Foreign distributions, 1960s
Box 11
Growth rates of income and wealth, 1960s
Box 11
Guidelines and guideposts, 1960s
Box 11
Heterodox approaches to income distribution, undated
Box 11
Incidence of collective bargaining, 1973
Box 11
Kyoto data, 1980
Box 11
Lydall book
Box 11
Methodology, 1940s, 1950s
Box 11
Microeconomic issues, 1960s, 1970s
Box 11
Neoclassical macro distribution theory, 1960s
Box 11
Other topics on distribution, 1970s
Box 11
Poverty, 1980s
Box 11
Production functions, 1960s, 1970s
Box 11
Stieglitz paper, 1968
Box 11
Technological progress, 1966-1967
Box 11
Ten issues on distribution theory, 1970s
Box 11
U.S. income distribution, 1940s, 1960s
Box 11
Wages and employment, 1968
Box 11
Wage differentials, 1970s
Box 11

After the Second World War, Bronfenbrenner played an important consultative role in economic relations between the U.S. and Japan. His work and research on the Japanese economy during this period and in subsequent years cover almost all relevant economic issues, with emphasis on development economics, banking, and trade. The series also houses a published collection of short stories regarding his experience in Japan. Formats include research notes, speeches, writings by Bronfenbrenner, papers written by other authors relevant to his research, correspondence, newspaper articles, and other items. The folders are ordered alphabetically by original title.

Academics in Japan, 1974-1977
Box 12
Banking system, 1969
Box 12
Class notes
Box 12
Conferences, 1961-1963
Box 12
Consumer sovereignty, 1989
Box 12
Development economics, 1960s
Box 12
Economic aspects of occupation, 1960s and 1970s
(2 folders)
Box 12
Economic growth, 1960s and 1974
(2 folders)
Box 12
Economic history of occupation, 1970s
Box 13
Economic thought, 1955, 1967-1968
Box 13
Education, 1987
Box 13
Galbrathian economy, 1970
Box 13
Growth and recession, 1990s
Box 13
Harry Johnson memorial lecture, 1978
Box 13
History of Japan, 1989
Box 13
Income distribution, 1960s
Box 13
Industrial revolution, 1968-1969
Box 13
Japan Foundation, 1970s
Box 13
Japanese universities, 1960s
Box 13
Kanji vs Romaji, 1956 and 1977
Box 13
Kato-Kyoso (excessive competition), 1960s
Box 13
Kenan Foundation, 1982-1984
Box 14
Labor economics, 1970s
Box 14
Lessons of Japanese development, 1986
Box 14
Letters, 1980s
Box 14
Lockheed in Japan, 1976-1977
Box 14
Locomotive theory, 1978-1979
Box 14
Loose materials on Japanese economy and economics
Box 14
Management
Box 14
Meiji Era, 1959 and 1960s
Box 14
Modern Japan, 1979-1980
Box 14
Miscellaneous
Box 14
News from Japan, 1980s
Box 14
Newspaper articles, 1980s and 1990s
Box 14
NIEO proposals/debt problem, 1980s
Box 14
Notes
Box 14
Occupation economics, 1960s
Box 14
Occupation of Japan, 1978-1979
(2 folders)
Box 15
Open economy macroeconomics, 1980s
Box 15
Post-war recovery, 1940s
Box 15
Professor Takata, 1980
Box 15
Productivity, 1981
Box 15
Prospects of Japanese democracy, 1955
Box 15
Radharaman Prasad Sinha C.V.
Box 15
Recession, 1970s
Box 15
Relations between U.S. and Japan, 1970s
Box 15
Shimomura controversy (Japan Development Bank), 1960s
Box 15
Short stories, 1978
Box 15
System of economic education, 1963
Box 15
Taxation, 1949
Box 15
Tomioka Stories from Occupied Japan
Box 15
Trade notes and leaflets, 1950s-1970s
Box 15
Trade council, 1960s and 1970s
(1 of 3 folders)
Box 15
Trade council, 1960s and 1970s
(2 of 3 folders)
Box 16
Trade creation, undated
Box 16
Trade U.S.-Japan and letters, 1971
Box 16
Trickle-down, 1980-1981
Box 16
U.S.-Japan trade relations, 1961-1975
Box 16
Value-added tax/Shoup visit, 1988
Box 16
War bride's problem, 1950s
Box 16
Waseda university centennial, 1982
Box 16
Welfare state, undated
Box 16
Trade creation, undated
Box 16
Western economy transported on Japan, 1983
Box 16

Topics covered include macroeconomics, especially in U.S. monetary economics, international trade and economic growth theory. Formats include notes, speeches, drafts and other writings, papers written by other economicsts on topics relevant to Bronfenbrenner's research, correspondence relevant to the subject, clippings and articles, and other miscellaneous documents. Arranged alphabetically by original folder title.

Aggregate wage theory, 1978-1980
Box 17
Baumol and Lovell papers, 1960s
Box 17
Brain drain, 1960s
Box 17
Business responsibility, 1970s
Box 17
Chicago School, 1979
Box 17
Cliometrics, 1977
Box 17
Clinton health plans, 1994
Box 17
Commission on money and credit, 1960s
Box 17
Cost-push inflation, 1974
Box 17
Crash of 1929, 1979
Box 17
Currency choice defense, 1979-1980
Box 17
Davidson on Keynes on money, 1979
Box 17
Demand for money, 1960s
(1 of 2 folders)
Box 17
Demand for money, 1960s
(2 of 2 folders)
Box 18
Econometrics, 1950s
Box 18
Economic controls, 1976
Box 18
The economist's "ABC for reflation", 1986
Box 18
Elasticity and absorption: approaches in international macroeconomics, 1975
Box 18
Elasticity version of the equation of exchange, 1970s
Box 18
Encyclopedia of Social Sciences: Inflation, 1961-1963
Box 18
Essays, 1989
Box 18
Free trade, protection and international income equality, 1977
Box 18
Friedman vs Keynes, 1966
Box 18
Friedman-Mieselman controversy, 1965-1966
Box 18
Frey's dilemma, 1974
Box 18
Hoarding on the wing, 1988
Box 18
Indexation, 1978-1979
Box 18
Inflation, 1970
Box 18
Inflation persistence
Box 18
Inflation and stagflation (to encyclopedia), 1983
Box 18
International competitiveness and the U.S. dollar, 1985-1987
Box 19
International macroeconomics, 1970
Box 19
International trade, 1965
Box 19
Japanese productivity, 1982
Box 19
Joint economic committee, 1969
Box 19
Keynesian employment function, 1976
Box 19
Korea and the Yen-Dollar rate, 1990
Box 19
"Let-'er-Rip" inflation policies, 1971
Box 19
Labor-supply, 1965-1966
Box 19
Land taxation, 1969
Box 19
Liquidity functions, 1959
Box 19
Macroeconomics textbook draft, 1970-1974
(1 of 2 folders)
Box 19
Macroeconomics textbook draft, 1971-1974
(2 of 2 folders)
Box 19
Marginalism in labor economics
Box 19
Microeconomics of inflation, 1978-1979
Box 19
Monetary rules, 1960s
Box 20
Monetary statistics of the U.S.
Box 20
Multiplier theory, 1961
Box 20
On dumping gold, 1979
Box 20
OPEC, 1980s
Box 20
Phillips curve reconsidered
Box 20
Poverty, 1960s and 1970s
Box 20
Private savings, 1960s
(1 of 2 folders)
Box 20
Private savings, 1981
(2 of 2 folders)
Box 20
Profit theory, 1950s and 1960s
Box 20
Public appropriations, 1965
Box 20
Scarcity hypothesis, 1968 and 1970
Box 20
Sensitivity analysis for econometricians, 1972
Box 20
Statistical refinements of the inflation concept, 1965
Box 20
Square root rule, 1960s
Box 20
Sraffa controversy, 1974
Box 20
Stagflation, 1970
(1 of 2 folders)
Box 20
Stagflation, 1974
(2 of 2 folders)
Box 20
Stagflation theory, 1976
Box 20
Theory of employment, 1986
Box 20
Walras's law, 1990
Box 20
Wisconsin, 1985
Box 20

Following Bronfenbrenner's own filing system, this research-related subseries contains folders labelled with individuals' names, most of them notable economists, in whose research Bronfenbrenner was interested or with whom he corresponded, or both. There are also two "Miscellaneous" folders. The folders contain a mix of materials: correspondence between Bronfenbrenner and the economist named on the folder, annotated and unmarked articles, and papers by Bronfenbrenner or by others. There are two folders of materials concerning Kei Shibata, who during the 1930s wrote on Marxian economics and equilibrium balance. Arranged in alphabetical order by last name.

Adelman, M., 1949-1953
Box 21
Baumol, W., 1982
Box 21
Davidson, P., 1979
Box 21
De Fremeny [Fremery?], 1971-1976
Box 21
Ferguson, C., 1971
Box 21
Fitzgerald, B., 1971, 1975, undated
Box 21
Friedman, M., 1952, 1971-1975
Box 21
Gross, E., 1976
Box 21
Frisch, H., 1963-1979
Box 21
Galloway, L., undated
Box 21
Hamilton, E., 1975
Box 21
Hollander, S., 1983, 1988
Box 21
Hollister, R., 1978
Box 21
Kaldor, N., 1958
Box 21
Keesing, D., 1966
Box 21
Leijonhufvud, A., 1974
Box 21
Lerner, A., 1982
Box 21
Mayer, T., 1965
Box 21
Means, G., 1975
Box 21
Meltzer, A., 1968, 1993
Box 21
Minsky, H., 1980
Box 21
Miscellaneous professional correspondence, 1955-1992
(2 folders)
Box 22
Oshima, H., 1967
Box 22
Rhomberg, R., 1968
Box 22
Rothschild, K., 1964, undated
Box 22
Samuelson, P., 1980, undated
Box 22
Sato, R., 1966
Box 22
Warburton, C., 1951
Box 22
Sherman, H., 1966
Box 22
Shibata, K., 1962-1968, undated
(2 folders)
Box 22
Slichter, S., 1958
Box 22
Smith, V., 1964
Box 22
Solow, R., 1972
Box 22
Spengler, J., 1974
Box 22
Stein, H., 1982, undated
Box 22
Sweezy, P., 1968
Box 22
Tullock, G., 1976-1977
Box 22
Viner, J., 1969
Box 22
Williams, J., 1974
Box 22
Yasuba, Y., 1980, undated
Box 22

Consists chiefly of lecture notes, examination papers, and course syllabi covering subjects that Bronfenbrenner taught through classes and seminars at Carnegie-Mellon, Duke and in Japan, including microeconomics, macroeconomics, income distribution, international economics, trade, Japanese history and the Japanese economy. Box 27 is dedicated to correspondence between Bronfenbrenner and his graduate students.

Teaching files
Box 23-27

Clippings, newspapers, and other items from the Research Series, Heterodox and Japan subseries. A group of six Japanese campus newspapers contain front-page articles in the English language on 1969 student unrest and violence on Japanese campuses.

Daily Cardinal, Univ. of Wisconsin/Madison, article by Bronfenbrenner on Japanese university system, 1950 Oct. 7
Oversize Folder 1
Clipping, article by Bronfenbrenner on Japanese students in U.S., 1950 Dec.
Oversize Folder 1
McCarthy's Rise in Wisconsin, The Hindu, Madras, article by Bronfenbrenner, 1953 Sept. 21
Oversize Folder 1
The Mita Campus, Tokyo, Japan [English], campus newspapers, 1957 Apr.-1969 Nov.
(7 issues)
Oversize Folder 1
Clipping from Carnegie-Mellon campus newspapers, article by Bronfenbrenner on student unrest, 1969 Sept. 19
Oversize Folder 1
Small color poster, Japanese, with images of 16 political and social scientists, including Bronfenbrenner, circa 1960s
Oversize Folder 1
Statistical estimates of liquidity functions in the U.S., undated
Oversize Folder 1

Historical Note

Martin Bronfenbrenner was born in Pittsburgh in 1914 and died in 1997 in Durham, North Carolina, having just been made a Distinguished Fellow of the American Economics Association. He received his Ph.D. in 1939 from the Universtiy of Chicago and after a brief stint at the U.S. Treasury, enlisted in the U.S. Navy. He served in Japan during and after the war, and had a role in the rebuilding of Japan's economy and its relations with the U.S. Taking from his experiences in Japan, Bronfenbrenner published a volume of fictional short stories entitled Tomioka Stories from the Japanese Occupation. From 1947 on, Bronfenbrenner worked exclusively as a university professor. He served on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin (1947-1957), Michigan State University (1957-1958), the University of Minnesota (1958-1962), Carnegie Mellon (1962-1971), and Duke University where he held the Kenan Chair from 1971 until 1984. In 1984, he moved to Japan as a professor of international economics at the Aoyama Gakuin University in Tokyo, Japan, and in 1991 he returned to Duke University where he taught until his death in 1997. Throughout this period Bronfenbrenner's interests were very wide-ranging and included income distribution theory, labor economics, Marxian and radical economics, development, Japanese economics and history, comparative economic systems, monetary theory and the history of economics. Bronfenbrenner served as vice-president of the American Economic Association (1976-1977), president of the Southern Economic Association (1979-1980), and president of the History of Economics Society (1982-1983).

Subject Headings

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Martin Bronfenbrenner Papers, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University

Provenance

The Martin Bronfenbrenner Papers were received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a gift in 1984, 1993, and 1997.

Processing Information

Processed by Danilo Da Silva, Chris Payne, June 2010

Encoded by Danilo Da Silva, Paula Jeannet Mangiafico, and Chris Payne, June 2010

The original accession from 1984 and additions 93-175, 97-071, and 97-134 were merged into one collection, described in this finding aid.

Descriptive sources and standards used to create this inventory: DACS, EAD, NCEAD guidelines, and local Style Guide.

This finding aid is NCEAD compliant.