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Guide to the Francis Warrington Dawson Family Papers, 1386-1963 (bulk 1859-1950)

Abstract

[COLLECTION IS CURRENTLY BEING PROCESSED. CONTACT RESEARCH SERVICES IN ADVANCE FOR ACCESS.] Journalist, of Charleston, S.C., and Versailles, France. The collection (7918 items; dated 1386-1963, bulk 1859-1950) contains the papers of Francis Warrington Dawson, who was born Austin John Reeks; his wife, Sarah Ida Fowler Morgan Dawson; and their son, Francis Warrington Dawson II, better known as Warrington Dawson. The papers are primarily literary in character but also include many letters. Francis's papers are primarily autobiographical with information about his Civil War service, travels, courtship, and career. Also present are Morgan family papers describing social life in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, La., in the second half of the 19th century, especially during Reconstruction. Warrington Dawson materials document his work with the American Embassy in Paris and describes French life and politics. Also present is material from his work as director of French Research for Colonial Williamsburg, Inc., including copies (made from the originals at Colonial Williamsburg) of original documents pertaining to French participation in the American Revolution. Also included are copies of 18th century maps of North America, Williamsburg, Va., and positions of the French and American armies in New York and Virginia during the Revolutionary War.

Descriptive Summary

Title
Francis Warrington Dawson Family papers
Creator
Dawson, Francis Warrington, 1840-1889.
Extent
10.5 linear feet, 7,986 items
Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

The collection comprises the papers of Francis Warrington (Frank) Dawson (1840-1889), whose original name was Austin John Reeks; his wife, Sarah Ida Fowler (Morgan) Dawson; and of their son, Francis Warrington Dawson II, known as Warrington Dawson (1878-1962). The papers are primarily literary in character, with many editorials, newspaper writings, short stories, novels, articles, and scrapbooks, diaries, and reminiscences, but also many letters. Papers of the senior Dawson contain three scrapbooks of clippings, letters, etc., which Dawson had arranged as a sort of biography of himself; loose letters and papers, primarily correspondence with his wife; two letterpress volumes with his replies to many of the letters in the scrapbooks and in the loose papers. Morgan family correspondence, beginning in 1859, describes the social life and customs in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, Louisiana; in Paris, France; and the death of Henry Waller Morgan in a duel in 1861. Letters of Thomas Gibbes Morgan, Sr., describe Confederate mobilization in 1861. Correspondence of Frank Dawson and members of the Morgan family describe Dawson's passage on the blockade runner Nashville, his career as ordnance officer in Longstreet's corps and later in Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry corps; the destruction of homes in Louisiana by the war and Butler's conduct in New Orleans; the battle of Fredericksburg; imprisonment at Fort Delaware; refugee life at Macon, Mississippi; cavalry operations; the causes of Confederate defeat; a duel of Henry Rives Pollard, editor of the Richmond Examiner; politics and journalism in Reconstruction South Carolina; the editorial policies of Dawson's paper, the Charleston News and Courier; accusations of bribery, fraud, and libel; the courtship of Dawson and Sarah (Morgan) Dawson; Dawson's refusal of a challenge to a duel by Martin Witherspoon Gary; the army bill, 1879; the Tilden-Hayes disputed election, 1876; the redemption of South Carolina; Morgan family genealogy; travel in Italy and Europe in the 1880s; education in South Carolina at state-supported colleges and the Citadel; the Charleston earthquake, 1886; Dawson's alleged remarks about Grover Cleveland, reported in the New York World, 1886; labor and labor organizations; the tariff; court procedures in South Carolina; Confederate veterans' organizations; Democratic Party affairs; Dawson's debts; his murder; and the settlement of his estate. Among Dawson's frequent correspondents are Daniel Henry Chamberlain, Edward B. Dickinson, Samuel Dibble, Fitzhugh Lee, Robert Baker Pegram, Henry A. M. Smith, Hugh Smith Thompson, Benjamin Ryan Tillman, Giddings Whitney, and Benjamin H. Wilson.

There is also correspondence of Sarah Dawson and Warrington Dawson, newsman, novelist, editor, special assistant to the American Embassy in Paris, and director of French research for Colonial Williamsburg. This material gives glimpses of French life, 1900-1950, and information on the families of Joseph Conrad and Theodore Roosevelt. Regular letters of Sarah Dawson to Eunice (Martin) Dunkin (Mrs. William Huger Dunkin) and to her sister, Mrs. Lavina (Morgan) Drum of Bethesda, Maryland, comment on French and Washington, D.C., social life and customs. Dawson's writings as Paris correspondent of the United Press Associations of America after 1900 are in clippings in the scrapbooks. They reflect French and world affairs. Topics treated in correspondence include Theodore Roosevelt's safari; Roosevelt's opinions; press relations for the Roosevelt party in Africa; Roosevelt's reviews of Dawson's books; Dawson's lectures and writings; Conrad's writings; other literary matters; John Powell's career as a concert pianist; seances and mediums; the Taft administration; Roosevelt and race relations; the Negro in Liberia, Nigeria, Haiti, and the U.S.; Roosevelt's political career; the Fresh Air Art Society of London; the organization of the press bureau in the U.S. embassy in Paris; and the work of the Foreign Department of the Committee on Public Information.

Embassy memoranda by Dawson cover the Central Powers; the Supreme War Council meetings; French labor; the liberated regions of France; the Young Men's Christian Association; reaction to U.S. requisition of Dutch shipping; the Rhine frontier; allied land transportation; French government bureaus, personnel, politics, and administration; economic affairs; and finance in the Far East. Postwar diplomatic memoranda by Dawson, 1946-1958, 3 vols., concern French economic conditions, labor, communism, atomic warfare, politics, French leaders including Charles de Gaulle, Indochina, and the U.S.S.R. Letters also cover German reparations; relief work in Austria and the Near East; details of embassy staff work; George Harvey's mission to Europe, 1921; the Washington Disarmament Conference; French finance and politics; war debts; international finance; Coueism; French socialism; a crisis in the publication of the Charleston News and Courier, 1927; the boy scout movement; the Conrad family after Joseph's death; Theodore Roosevelt; U.S. investment in the U.S.S.R.; the restoration of Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia; the French dead at Yorktown; research in French sources on Rochambeau's army; reports to Harold Shurtleff, in charge of the research department of Colonial Williamsburg; the research of Peter Stuyvesant Barry on his grandfather, Frank Dawson; personal and family matters; Dawson's health; restoration of the Lee mansion, Stratford; the Great Depression in the United States and in France; the genealogy of the Chambrun family; the role of Lafayette in Florida land settlement; the Compañía Arrendataria del Monopolio de Petroleos, a Spanish firm in which the French Petroleum Company held an interest; the war records of Theodore Roosevelt's sons; and autograph collecting for the Schroeder Foundation, Webster Groves, Missouri. Major correspondents of Warrington Dawson include Ethel (Dawson) Barry, Phyllis (Windsor-Clive) Benton, Jessie Conrad, Joseph Conrad, Annie Cothran, Alice Dukes, Camille Flammarion, Clarence Payne Franklin, A. H. Frazier, Hugh Gibson, Alice Stopford Green, Yves Guyot, Mary Goodwin, William Archer Rutherfoord Godwin, Herman Hagedorn, Ralph Tracy Hale, Constance (Cary) Harrison, Leland Harrison, Elizabeth Hayes, Henriette Joffre, James Kerney, Grace King, Rudyard Kipling, Georges Ladoux, William Loeb, Jr., Samuel Frank Logan, Andrew W. Miller, C. V. Miller, Francois Millet, L. D. Morel, James Morris Morgan, Frederick Palmer, John Powell, Auguste Rodin, the Duke end Duchess de Rohan, Edith Roosevelt, Nicholas Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt, Max Savelle, H. L. Schroeder, George Sharp, Hallie (Clough) Sharp, Philip Simms, George E. Smith, Vance Thompson, and Robert William Vail.

A group of transcripts of diplomatic dispatches of Comte Louis Barbe Charles Serurier, French minister in Washington, to Talleyrand, Oct., 1812-June, 1813, describe the opening phrases of the War of 1812, United States opinion concerning France, the divorce proceedings of Elizabeth (Patterson) Bonaparte, interviews with Secretary of State James Monroe, Joel Barlow's negotiations for a commercial treaty with France, embargo, non-importation, and impressment; Republican and Federalist activities; and affairs in New Granada (Columbia). A later series of dispatches from the French minister in Washington, Alphonse J. Y. Pageot, 1835-1848, relates to American spoliation claims against France, American public opinion, analyses of nullification, the Bank of the United States crisis, abolition, and other aspects of American politics. Dispatches of 1841-1843 from Madrid contain information on Spanish affairs, and the guardianship and marriage of the Spanish queen. Later dispatches from Washington concern commercial relations between France and the United States; annexation of Texas and Oregon; the Mexican War and the question of slavery in the territories and its implications for disunion; and the war's effect on French commerce.

Among bills, receipts, and legal papers are materials of J. M. Morgan and the DeSaussure-Trenholm family, financial papers of the Charleston News and Courier, and records of the settlement of the estate of Frank Dawson.

There are manuscripts of writings by Sarah Dawson; manuscripts, fragments, lectures by Warrington Dawson and Theodore Roosevelt; a log and a diary of Roosevelt's African trip; Roosevelt's notes on the policy of his administration in regard to Negroes; extracts from letters and speeches which the former president supplied for use in connection with Dawson's book, Opportunity and Theodore Roosevelt; manuscripts of the book; essays and drafts by Jessie Conrad, Auguste Rodin, Vance Thompson, and Georges Ladoux, reflecting on Dawson's friendships and literary collaborations; and other manuscripts dealing with psychical research. There are also manuscripts, research instructions, notes, page proofs, and other papers resulting from Dawson's research for Colonial Williamsburg, and from his novels and short stories; genealogical papers of the Morgan family and related Gibbes, Fowler, Waller, Hunt, Bunyan, and Baynton families, including a chart of the Reeks family of England; and notes for Dawson's lectures on art, France, Charleston, the Negro in America, Joseph Conrad, and Theodore Roosevelt.

Bound volumes include Frank Dawson's scrapbooks, 1875-1888, 3 vols., relating to his editorship of the Charleston News and Courier and to Democratic politics, and contain editorials, and other newspaper clippings relating to Dawson, letters from his friends, and speeches. There is information on Dawson's opinions concerning the economic theories of Henry George and letters from George. There are also letterpress books, 2 vols., 1870s-1887, largely containing political correspondence. Miscellaneous volumes hold Dawson's plays, poems, clippings, and copies of letters from Mary Haxall. Business records include an address book; cashbook, 1886-1888; ledger, 1867-1872; notebook on the finances of the News and Courier; a private ledger, 1867-1887; and miscellaneous financial notebooks. For Sarah Dawson there are scrapbooks, 1853-1882, 3 vols., with clippings, her letters to the News and Courier, and accounts of the death of Frank Dawson and tributes to him. Sarah Dawson's manuscript diaries, 1862-1866, 6 vols. (largely published 1913), also include notes from ca. 1896-1906. There are notebooks of Sarah explaining her husband's death, a manuscript by Warrington Dawson commenting on the same subject, and biographical accounts of Frank Dawson and other family members. Other notebooks of Sarah Dawson, 4 vols., 1898-1908, concern her life, travel, and psychical phenomena.

There are diaries of Warrington Dawson, 1898, 1914-1918, 1930-1931, 1934-1945, 4 vols., and of Ethel Dawson, 1888-1891, 1 vol. Warrington's reminiscences of World War I deal with the French intelligence service and attributes the origin of his illness and that of Woodrow Wilson to German biological warfare. A second reminiscence concerns his work for the American Embassy in the 1930s and his life in Paris under German occupation, and has information on the dietary work of B. Lytton-Bernard (Bernard Trappachuh). A third reminiscence gives a mystical interpretation of world events, 1932-1945. Warrington Dawson also left scrapbooks, 1884-1952, 4 vols., preserving many of his newspaper writings. Dawson's collection of French manuscripts and autographs, 1386-1830, relates to his interest in genealogy and concern the de Bethune, de Crequi, Chevalier, and related families, and include a few parchments concerning Maximilien de Béthune, Duc de Sully, and Henry IV, King of France.

The collection includes a number of photographs of Joseph and Jessie Conrad, Warrington Dawson, Sarah Dawson, Ethel (Dawson) Barry, Herbert Barry, Frank Dawson, Daniel H. Chamberlain (Reconstruction governor of South Carolina), François Millet, Woodrow Wilson, Archibald Forbes, Lord Windsor, the Chateau de Josselin (signed by the Duke and Duchess de Rohan), historical monuments and their inscriptions in Virginia, the Charleston earthquake, and Warrington Dawson's Versailles apartment.

There is also microfilm, 1 reel, of published and unpublished works by and about Warrington Dawson and Joseph Conrad, filmed from the originals at the Ralph Foster Museum, The School of the Ozarks, Point Lookout, Missouri.

Administrative Information

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COLLECTION IS CURRENTLY BEING PROCESSED. CONTACT RESEARCH SERVICES IN ADVANCE FOR ACCESS.

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Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library to use this collection.

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Contents of the Collection

Correspondence, 1859-1963 and undated

(31 boxes)

Material in this series has been first arranged according to the creator's surname (the majority also include the recipient's name), and then by date. Unsigned or unidentified correspondence can be found in "General Corresondence" folders at the end of each box, organized by date. The finding aid lists the dates of each box and includes creators found within that box.

Correspondence, 1859-1873
Box 1
Correspondence, 1874-1885
Box 2
Correspondence, 1886-1887
Box 3
Correspondence, 1888-1889, Jan.-Mar. 14
Box 4
Correspondence, 1889, Mar. 15-1899
Box 5
Correspondence, 1900-1907
Box 6
Correspondence, 1908-1910
Box 7
Correspondence, 1911-1917
Box 8
Correspondence, 1918-1920
Box 9
Correspondence, 1921
Box 10
Correspondence, 1922-1924
Box 11
Correspondence, 1925-1926
Box 12
Correspondence, 1927-1928
Box 13
Correspondence, 1929
Box 14
Correspondence, 1930, Jan.-Sept.
Box 15
Correspondence, 1930, Oct.-Dec.
Box 16
Correspondence, 1931, Jan.-Mar.
Box 17
Correspondence, 1931, Apr.-June
Box 18
Correspondence, 1931, July-Sept.
Box 19
Correspondence, 1931, Oct.-Nov.
Box 20
Correspondence, 1931, Dec.-1932, Feb.
Box 21
Correspondence, 1932, Mar.-July
Box 22
Correspondence, 1932, Aug.-Dec.
Box 23
Correspondence, 1933
Box 24
Correspondence, 1934-1935
Box 25
Correspondence, 1936-1939
Box 26
Correspondence, 1940-1963
Box 27
Correspondence, undated
Box 28
Diplomatic correspondence, 1946-1958
Box 29
Memos to the United States Embassy in Paris, Vols. I, II, and III (typescript)
Box 29
Diplomatic correspondence, 1812-1848
Box 30
Dispatches of Louis Serurier and Alphonse Pageot
Box 30
Bills and receipts
Box 31
Legal papers
Box 31

Writings

(38 boxes)
Extracts made by Sarah (Morgan) Dawson from the correspondence of Madame, Duchesse d'Orleans, Charlotte Elizabeth of Bavaria, mother of the Regent of France, Vols. I and II
Box 32
Sarah (Morgan) Dawson
Box 33
Memoirs of Manquise de Crequy
Box 33
Miscellaneous writings
Box 33
Joseph Conrad and F.W. Dawson II, on Joseph Conrad
Box 34
Auguste Rodin and Vance Thompson
Box 34
Theodore Roosevelt (including F.W. Dawson II writings and Opportunity and Theodore Roosevelt)
Box 35
Theodore Roosevelt
British East Africa Log
Box 36
Scribble Diary
Box 36
Roosevelt speeches
Box 36
Roosevelt on Race. Pictures.
Box 36
Revolutionary War Papers
Box 37
Photostats and copies of correspondence of Comte de Rochambeau, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, et al.
Box 37
French Officers: dossiers, journals, souvenirs and letters (A-G)
Box 38
French Officers: dossiers, journals, souvenirs, and letters (L-Z)
Box 39
Maps, research memoranda, new series, press releases, nos. 1-200, Feb. 24-Sept. 5, 1931
Box 40
Research memoranda, new series nos. 201-445, Sept. 7, 1931-Aug. 5, 1932
Box 41
Page proof of Dawson book on French dead
Box 42
Lists of French dead in America
Box 42
Lists of French regiments, of maps, research institutions, etc.
Box 42
Miscellaneous Segonne research memoranda duplicates
Box 43
Early prose and poetry, 1890s
Box 44
Poems (1 vol.)
Box 44
Vengeance Cast Away
Box 44
The Arrow of Love
Box 44
Blink's Ghost
Box 44
The Mistaken Engagement; Volatile Gratitude
Box 44
Georges Ladoux and F.W. Dawson III
Box 45
Marthe Richard and The Kaiser's Blonde Spy
Box 45
The True Dimension (from the mss. The Purser's Shilling)
Box 46
The Gift of Paul Clermont (3 vols.)
Box 47
Paul Clermont's Story and My Own
Box 48
LeDon de Paul Clermont
Box 48
The Scar (holo. mss.)
Box 49
The Scar (typescript and fragment)
Box 50
The Scourge (typescript and fragment)
Box 50
The Scourge (holo. mss.)
Box 51
The Grand Elixir ( The Green Mustache)
Box 52
Adventure in the Night
Box 53
The Guardian Demons
Box 54
Sibylla
Box 54
The Rock ( Border Lines)
Box 55
The Rock ( Border Lines)
Box 56
Buzz and Fury
Box 57
Introduction, A Confederate Girl's Diary
Box 57
The Pyramid
Box 58
Living Art-A Novel of Paris
Box 59
The Pyramid
Box 59
Le Negre and Etats Unis
Box 60
The Sin
Box 60
The Golden Part
Box 60
Exhit Wills ( The Flight)
Box 60
Miscellany
Box 61
Reminiscences: 13 Windows, etc.
Box 61
Texas Duel
Box 62
Essential Stories
Box 62
The Corpse and the Curtain
Box 62
The Novel of George
Box 63
The Pyramid
Box 63
The Sin-An Allegory of Truth
Box 63
Thad Wrenson
Box 64
The Idyl of Mayna Vayne
Box 64
The Virgin of Ivory (holo. mss.)
Box 65
Le Rapt de la Vierge
Box 65
The Man Who Wouldn't Be Dead
Box 66
The Crystal Screen
Box 66
War Memoirs and Miscellany of William Graves Sharp (1)
Box 67
War Memoirs and Miscellany of William Graves Sharp (2)
Box 68
War Memoirs and Miscellany of William Graves Sharp (3)
Box 69
Morgan Family Biographies and Genealogies (including articles by James Morris Morgan)
Box 70
Lectures and short writings by F.W. Dawson II
Box 71
Pscyhic
Box 71
Lectures and short writings by F.W. Dawson II
Box 72
Dawson family biographies
Box 73
Notebooks on the death of F.W. Dawson I by Sarah (Morgan) Dawson
Box 73
Fragment of Confederate Memoirs; including the J.C. Hemphill sketch of F.W. Dawson I.
Box 73

Volumes

(10 boxes, 4 volumes)
Drama, poetry, and accounts
Box 74
Papers and scrapbooks of F.W. Dawson I
Box 75
Scrapbook I, 1875-1884
Box 75
Letterpress books of F.W. Dawson I
Box 75
I, 1879-1884
Box 75
II, 1884-1887
Box 75
Diaries and reminiscences
Box 76
Think It Not Strange, World War I
Box 76
At Neptune's Gates, World War II and later reminiscenes of 1914-1918
Box 76
Guest Book, 1909-1929
Box 76
Charleston Murders
Box 76
Scrapbook, 1853-1882, of Sarah Fowler (Morgan) Dawson
Box 77
Four notebooks, 1898-1908, of Sarah Fowler (Morgan) Dawson

The notebooks contain entries concerning her girlhood; Charleston, South Carolina; foreign travel; and mediums, spiritualism, and supernatural phenomena such as the reappearance of her deceased husband.

Box 77
Diary of Sarah Ida Fowler (Morgan) Dawson (6 vols.), 1862-1865 with postscripts, 1866-1960
Box 78
Robertson's Introduction
Box 78
Scrapbooks, 1888-1892 and 1930-1931
Box 79
Ethel (Dawson) Barry, Diary, 1888-1891
Box 80
F.W. Dawson II, Sea Diary, 1898 (1 vol.)
Box 80
F.W. Dawson II, War Diary, 1914-1918 (5 vols.)
Box 80
F.W. Dawson II, Williamsburg Diary, 1930-1931 (typscript)
Box 80
Sarah (Morgan) Dawson, Scrapbook, 1880-1897
Box 81
Sarah (Morgan) Dawson, Scrapbook, 1889-1893)
Box 81
Scrapbooks of F.W. Dawson (3 volumes), 1878-1887
Box 82
Scrapbooks, 1884-1915 and 1910-1953
Box 83
Sarah Fowler (Morgan) Dawson's scrapbook of clippings concerning Capt. Dawson's death, 1889-1893
Volume F:5323
A Tribute to Capt. Dawson from the Merchant's Exchange of Charleston, S.C., 1889
Box 100
Book, In Memoriam, Francis Warrington Dawson, 1840-1889
Box 100
The National Democratic Committee in Memoriam (for Francis Warrington Dawson)
Box 100

Printed Material

(4 boxes)
Clippings
Box 84
Clippings
Box 85
Sarah and Francis W. Dawson I
Box 85
Menus, invitations, and envelopes
Box 85
Clippings
Box 86
Williamsburg and Yorktown, Va.
Box 86
Pamphlets
Box 87
Joseph Conrad and Theodore Roosevelt
Box 87

Photographs Series

(4 boxes)
Revolutionary War
Box 88
French soldiers
Box 88
Williamsburg
Box 88
Yorktown
Box 88
Conrad, Joseph, family and Ellen
Box 89
Theodore Roosevelt/Glasgow
Box 89
Theodore Roosevelt's Expedition to Africa
Box 89
Dawson family, relatives, etc.
Box 90
Dawson friends
Box 91
Miscellaneous
Box 91
List of the French manuscripts
Box 92
Due de Sully, Bethune and Related Families, Folder I: 1-31
Box 92
Due de Sully, Bethune and Related Families, Folders I: 32-41
Box 93
Miscellaneous, Folders II: 1-7
Box 93
Fragments and drafts of Francis Warrington Dawson II
Box 94
Correspondence, 1866-1929, Oct. 24
Box 95
Correspondence, 1929, Dec. 4-1950, Sept. 6
Box 96
Correspondence, 1951-1956, Oct. 30, n.d.
Box 97
Legal papers, 1850, Dec. 18-1948, Mar. 4
Box 97
Financial papers, 1882, May 19-1954, Jan. 5
Box 97
Genealogy
Box 97
Miscellany
Box 97
Writings
Box 97
Clippings, Warrington Dawson
Box 98
Photographs (15 images)
Box 98
Volumes (5)

Warrington Dawson's handwritten journals, autograph books, drafts, and essays, dating from the 1930s.

Box 98
Volumes (6)

Warrington Dawson's handwritten journals, drafts, and essays, including History of My Bride, 1929, and University School, Richmond, Va., 1895.

Box 99
Maps

Oversize folder in Box 100 containing encapsulated reproductions of 8 maps from Virginia, New York, and the North American continents, dating from the 1700s through the 1930s, collected by Warrington Dawson from Williamsburg.

Box 100
Photographs

Oversize folder containing photographs of sculpture, people, and places.

Box 100
Rodin, Auguste (4)
Box 100
F.W. Dawson II (2)
Box 100
Constant, Benjamin J.
Box 100
Chambrun, Charles
Box 100
[Old Ministry of War...]
Box 100
Accession 6/21/88

Draft of an undated play, Strange Guests for Dinner, by Francis Warrington Dawson; miscellaneous correspondence.

Box 100
Charleston earthquake photographs, 1886
Arrangement note

These images are mounted on cardboard and are approximately 16x20 inches, unless otherwise noted. They are arranged in four oversize boxes, which have been numbered in the catalog as Image Boxes 1-4. Most photographs were taken by C.C. Jones of the U.S. Geological Survey on August 31, 1886. Some photographs have additional captions, added later, written on their cardboard mounts. At least two photographs are personal, and show the Dawson residence following the earthquake.

Box Image Box 1
Broken cornice on St. Michael's Church, Southeast corner of Broad and Meeting Streets, Looking Southeast
Box Image Box 1
Brick wall of the city Jail on Magazine Street near Luzon, fissured by earthquake
Box Image Box 1
Double exposure of the Granite Works. Dominant image is a yard of granite monuments, some of which have been toppled by the earthquake.
Box Image Box 1
Granite Works
Box Image Box 1
Craterlet and curdled mud flakes on Ten Mile Hill
Box Image Box 1
Sinkhole under a house on Ten Mile Hill
Box Image Box 1
Displaced monument, St. John's Lutheran Church, Archdale Street, Looking South
Box Image Box 1
Craterlet on Ten Mile Hill
Box Image Box 1
Displaced portico of the synogogue on Hazel Street
Box Image Box 1
Scotch Presbyterian Church, Cemetary, and Convent
Box Image Box 1
Encampment on Capt. Dawson's lawn (6x9 inch photograph)
Box Image Box 2
Capt. Dawson's house (6x9 inch photograph)
Box Image Box 2
Gadsden House, Bishop's Residence, Broad Street
Box Image Box 2
Wooden house in Lincolnville which was thrown by the earthquake
Box Image Box 2
Camp in Courthouse Square, City Park, Broad Street and Meeting Street
Box Image Box 2
Gable of a brick house at the corner of Queen and Mazyck Streets.
Box Image Box 2
Displaced coping on the portico of the old guardhouse on the southwest corner of Meeting and Broad Streets
Box Image Box 2
Hiberian Hall, Meeting Street
Box Image Box 2
Displaced monument, St. John's Lutheran Church, Archdale Street, Looking North
Box Image Box 2
Large craterlet on Ten Mile Hill
Box Image Box 3
St. John's Lutheran Church, Archdale Street, Looking Southeast
Box Image Box 3
Damaged tower and coping of the city hospital on the southwest corner of Luzon and Magazine Streets.
Box Image Box 3
Damaged foundations of wooden houses
Box Image Box 3
Displaced towers and coping of the city hospital on the southwest corner of Luzon and Magazine Streets
Box Image Box 3
Damage to the Old Planter's Hotel, St. Philip's Church, Church Home, and Huguenot Church
Box Image Box 3
Damaged chimneys at the southwest corner of Beaufin and Archdale Streets.
Box Image Box 3
East Bay Street, with collapsed buildings
Box Image Box 4
Cufflinks

14 carat gold cuff links which Dr. Bernard Lytton-Bernard of Guadalahara [sic], Mexico, presented to the Dawson Collection on April 6, 1966. He said they were given to Dawson by Theodore Roosevelt and in an impulsive moment Dawson gave them to him.

Box Relics Box

Subject Headings

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Francis Warrington Dawson Family Papers, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Provenance

The Francis Warrington Dawson Family Papers were received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a gift between 1950 and 1988.

Processing Information

Processed by Rubenstein Library Staff, date unknown

Encoded by Meghan Lyon, July 2010

Accessions were merged into one collection, described in this finding aid.