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Guide to the Evaporated Milk Association Collection, 1924-1934

Abstract

The Evaporated Milk Association, organized by manufacturers in 1923, issued free publications promoting the use of evaporated milk throughout the United States.

This collection consists of publications with recipes, scientific studies, and stories encouraging the consumption of canned evaporated milk. These pamphlets and booklets were donated to Duke University Libraries in the 1930s by the Evaporated Milk Association.

Descriptive Summary

Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University
Creator
Evaporated Milk Association
Title
Evaporated Milk Association collection 1924-1934
Language of Material
English
Extent
0.6 Linear Feet, 86 Items
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

This collection originally arrived at Perkins Library as three binders of promotional materials from the Evaporated Milk Association. The materials have been transferred to Rubenstein Library and are no longer in binders.

The materials include both pamphlets and booklets covering a wide range of themes -- all relating to evaporated milk and targeting potential consumers. Topics include: recipes, both for regular cooking, desserts, and for preparing large quantities of food; studies and articles promoting infant feeding using evaporated milk; plays and activities for children centering on the emergency delivery of evaporated milk rations (among other supplies) to isolated areas; cost breakdowns of evaporated milk versus fresh milk, aimed at budget-conscious families; cartoons detailing the delicious flavor of evaporated milk; reprints of medical or scientific journal articles discussing evaporated milk's consumption in impoverished or malnourished communities, or by populations with various diseases; and articles about the history of evaporated milk, its manufacturing process, and general information about evaporated milk as a product. All of these pamphlets date from the pre-World War II period and are aimed at American readers.

The booklets and pamphlets have been kept in the order in which they were arranged in the binders. Dates are included when known.

Administrative Information

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 48 business hours in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

All or portions of this collection may be housed off-site in Duke University's Library Service Center. The library may require up to 48 hours to retrieve these materials for research use.

Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library to use this collection.

warning Use Restrictions

The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Contents of the Collection

Milk Drinks with the Better Richness, undated
Box 1
Evaporated Milk: What it is, Why it is, 1924
Box 1
Food Fit for Camping Appetites, 1927
Box 1
Publications that may be obtained free through the Evaporated Milk Association, undated
Box 1
20 New Ice Cream Formulae, undated
Box 1
A Quart of Milk a Day, 1928
Box 1
Safety and Simplicity in Infant Feeding, 1928
Box 1
From Cow...to Consumer, 1928
Box 1
The Story of Evaporated Milk, 1928
Box 1
Eating for Efficiency, 1928
Box 1
The Patient and the Diet, 1928
Box 1
The Use of Unsweetened Evaporated Milk in Therapeutic Diets (reprint), 1928
Box 1
A Comparison of Evaporated Milk with Pasteurized Milk as a Source of Calcium, Phosphorus, and Nitrogen (reprint), 1927
Box 1
Textures of Ice Creams as Influenced by Some Constituents (reprint), 1928
Box 1
The Use of Unsweetened Evaporated Milk in Infant Feeding (reprint), 1927
Box 1
The Preparation of Acidophilus Milk (reprint), 1928
Box 1
The Baby's Milk (reprint), 1928
Box 1
Scientific References Pointing to the High Nutritive Value of Evaporated Milk (reprint), undated
Box 1
Scientific References Pointing to the High Nutritive Value of Evaporated Milk in Infant Feeding (reprint), undated
Box 1
Prescription booklet with infant formula chart, undated
Box 1
Evaporated Milk: Pure Cow's Milk for Every Milk Use (reprint), 1934
Box 1
What Evaporated Milk Offers the Dentist (reprint), 1933
Box 1
What to Make with Red Cross Flour (reprint), 1934
Box 1
Supplementary Mid-Morning Feeding of Rural School Children (reprint), 1934
Box 1
More Food for Your Money (reprint), undated
Box 1
Economies in Food: Quantity Recipes Using Evaporated Milk, 1934
Box 1
Why Evaporated Milk Makes Good Food Better, 1934
Box 1
Celiac Disease Treated from the Standpoint of Vitamin Deficiency (reprint), 1933
Box 1
The Use of Evaporated Milk in Digestive Disorders, Particularly Peptic Ulcer (reprint), 1934
Box 1
A Comparative Study of the Use of Unsweetened Evaporated Milk and Bottled Cow's Milk in Infant Feeding (reprint), 1932
Box 1
Evaporated Milk Drinks, 1934
Box 1
Safe and Unsafe Economy (reprint), undated
Box 1
The Use of Evaporated Milk in Quantity Cooking (reprint), 1933
Box 1
Proteins, Minerals and Vitamins of Evaporated Milk (reprint), 1934
Box 1
A Comparison of the Nutritional and Growth Values of Certain Infant Foods (reprint), 1934
Box 1
Growth and Retentions of Calcium, Phosphorus and Nitrogen of Infants Fed Evaporated Milk (reprint), 1933
Box 1
A Science Project, undated
Box 1
A Housewife Looks at the Committee on Foods (reprint), 1934
Box 1
The Airplane Rescue: A Play for Elementary Grades, undated
Box 1
The Laughing Moon: A Play for Junior and Senior High School, and Parent Groups, undated
Box 1
The Advantages of Evaporated Milk in Allergy and Infant Feeding (reprint), 1932
Box 1
The Adventures of Eva, Pora, and Ted, 1931
Box 1
Evaporated Milk Around the World (reprint), 1933
Box 1
Evaporated Milk for Health and Protection, 1932
Box 1
Evaporated Milk in Infant Feeding (reprint), 1932
Box 1
Evaporated Milk in Tropical West Africa, 1930
Box 1
Feeding a Family at Low Cost, 1932
Box 1
The Food Value of Frozen Evaporated Milk (reprint), 1932
Box 1
Frozen Foods: The Automatic Way, 1931
Box 1
The History of Evaporated Milk (reprint), 1932
Box 1
The Hot School Lunch: A Report of Programs Conducted by Fifty-seven Teachers in Rural Schools (reprint), 1932
Box 1
Ice-Frozen Desserts: Ice Creams, Sherbets, and Frozen Custards, 1932
Box 1
The Indispensable Food (reprint), 1930
Box 1
Infant Feeding with Unsweetened Evaporated Milk, 1931
Box 1
Infantile Diarrhea (reprint), 1932
Box 1
Lemon Juice Evaporated Milk in Infant Feeding (reprint), 1932
Box 1
Low Fat High Starch Evaporated Milk Feeding for the Marasmic Baby (reprint), 1931
Box 1
Milk: Spend Less, Have More by using Evaporated Milk, undated
Box 1
Milk for Better Meals, 1932
Box 1
Milk for Drinking as You Like It, 1930
Box 1
Modern Milk: The Story of Evaporated Milk, 1933
Box 1
More Milk, Smaller Bills, 1932
Box 1
New Facts about Baby Feeding (reprint), undated
Box 1
Nutritive Value of Evaporated Milk, 1931
Box 1
Overcoming Food Dislikes: A Study with Evaporated Milk (reprint), 1929
Box 1
Planning Lunches for School Children, 1931
Box 1
Quantity Recipes for Serving 25-50, 1931
Box 1
Recent Developments in the Use of Evaporated Milk in Infant Feeding (reprint), 1930
Box 1
The Relative Quantities of the Heat-Stable and Heat-Labile Fractions of Vitamin B in Raw and Evaporated Milk (reprint), 1932
Box 1
A Safer World for Babies, 1931
Box 1
A Simple, Inexpensive Stock Formula for Young Infants (reprint), 1932
Box 1
Some Facts about Evaporated Milk and Dairy Products, 1932
Box 1
Some Foods for Children, 1932
Box 1
The Sweet Taste of Safety That Comes from the Heating of Milk, undated
Box 1
The Treatment of Peptic Ulcers with an Evaporated Milk Diet (reprint), 1933
Box 1
A Bacteriological Investigation of Evaporated Milk (reprint), 1931
Box 1
A Comparison of the Vitamin G Values of Pasteurized Milk, Evaporated Milk, and Eggs (reprint), 1932
Box 1
A Comparative Study of Infant Foods (reprint), 1932
Box 1
Concentrated Milk in the Days of Napoleon, undated
Box 1
Effect of Evaporated Milk on the Incidence of Rickets in Infants (reprint), 1932
Box 1
Milk Made Candies, 1931
Box 1
The Care of Premature Infants (reprint), 1932
Box 1
Essentials in Infant Feeding (reprint), 1931
Box 1
Evaporated Milk: The Story of Its Development from 1810 to 1932 (reprint), 1932
Box 1
Evaporated and Condensed Milk from the Chemical and Nutritional Point of View (reprint), 1930
Box 1
The White Rat of Hawkins Hall, 1932
Box 1

Historical Note

Evaporated milk was developed over the course of the 19th century to address the need of armed forces in Europe to preserve food for long periods of time. Initially, milk was boiled and reduced, bottled with sugar, and then boiled again to create a seal. By the end of the American Civil War, sweetened condensed milk had grown in popularity, and its success encouraged inventors John B. Meyenberg and Louis Latzer to form the first unsweetened evaporated milk plant in Highland, Illinois. Meyenberg received an 1884 U.S. patent covering the process of sterilizing by steam under pressure. In 1885, evaporated milk was manufactured commercially for the first time.

The Spanish-American War further popularized evaporated milk as a sterile and transportable means of feeding troops. The introduction of homogenization in 1909 and continuous sterilization in 1922 led to increased consumption by the general public, and the milk was widely used to feed American troops during World War I.

The Evaporated Milk Association was organized by manufacturers in 1923, seeking to promote and encourage the consumption of evaporated milk, and also to research additional uses for the product. In the following years, recipes were developed and disseminated by the EMA through women's magazines, home economics professors, newspapers, and EMA pamphlets such as those sent to Duke Libraries. Furthermore, the Association sponsored numerous clinical studies (and reprinted independent studies) that encouraged the use of evaporated milk for infant feeding. This promotion was steadily expanded through the 1930s with an experimental kitchen, movies, educational outreach, and additional publications. The EMA sought to convince consumers that evaporated milk was a cost-effective, healthy, and safe product for budget-conscious family.

The Evaporated Milk Association continued to lobby and promote the industry throughout World War II and during the post-war period. It merged with the American Dairy Products Institute in 1987.

Subject Headings

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Evaporated Milk Association Collection, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Provenance

The Evaporated Milk Association Collection were received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a transfer from Perkins Library in 2009. The collection was originally donated between 1929 and 1934.

Processing Information

Processed by Meghan Lyon, May 2010

Encoded by Meghan Lyon, May 2010

This collection is minimally processed: materials may not have been ordered and described beyond their original condition.

Descriptive sources and standards used to create this inventory: DACS, EAD, NCEAD guidelines, and local Style Guide.

This finding aid is NCEAD compliant.

Accessions included in this finding aid: 2009-0157.