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Guide to the J. Walter Thompson Company. Carroll Carroll Papers, 1934-1979 and undated

Abstract

Founded in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the largest and oldest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. Carroll Carroll was the Editorial Supervisor of JWT radio programs, working in both the New York and Hollywood offices.

The Carroll Carroll Papers cover the years 1934-1979, with the bulk of materials covering the periods 1934-1956 and 1967-1968, when he worked as Editorial Supervisor of JWT radio programs. The collection consists of correspondence between Carroll and: other JWT employees; JWT clients; the Office of War Information; radio personalities; and family members. Also includes memoranda; scripts for radio programs; short announcements; three episode scripts for a proposed television series called Madison Avenue; speeches given at JWT meetings and dinners; and lead sheets for advertising jingles written by Carroll and others. Also includes a cassette recording and transcript of a biographical interview of Carroll, conducted by Les Tremayne in 1973. Companies and products represented in the collection include Ford, 7-Up, Chase & Sanborn, Shell, Kraft, Rinso and Kodak.

Descriptive Summary

Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University
Creator
J. Walter Thompson Company.
Title
J. Walter Thompson Company. Carroll Carroll papers 1934-1979 and undated
Language of Material
English
Extent
1 Linear Foot, 750 Items
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

The Carroll Carroll Papers cover the years 1934-1979, with the bulk of materials covering the periods 1934-1956 and 1967-1968, during which he worked as Editorial Supervisor of JWT radio programs. The collection consists of correspondence between Carroll and: other JWT employees; JWT clients; the Office of War Information; radio personalities; and family members. Also includes memoranda; scripts for radio programs; short announcements; three episode scripts for a proposed television series called "Madison Avenue" ; speeches given at JWT meetings and dinners; and lead sheets for advertising jingles written by Carroll and others. Also contains a cassette recording and transcript of a biographical interview of Carroll, conducted by Les Tremayne in 1973. Companies and products represented in the collection include Ford, 7-Up, Chase & Sanborn, Shell, Kraft, Rinso and Kodak.

General Files were taken from a folder of miscellaneous memoranda and newsletters. Biographical materials were placed in a separate folder. The correspondence files arrived already foldered, labeled and arranged chronologically. Folders were replaced, but labels and order were retained. The scripts and speeches music arrived in unlabeled folders or bound and labeled report folders. Extended scripts and speeches in unlabeled folders were foldered and labeled according to title. Shorter scripts were placed in a folder of miscellaneous scripts. Scripts in bound report folders were removed from binding and placed in individual folders, with original labels retained. Sheet music arrived in one folder, with no obvious arrangement. Musical materials were foldered by song, and arranged by author and date.

Administrative Information

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warning Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Original audiocassettes are closed to research for preservation reasons; however, there is a transcript of the tape contents in the collection. Contact Research Services for more information.

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

All or portions of this collection may be housed off-site in Duke University's Library Service Center. The library may require up to 48 hours to retrieve these materials for research use.

Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library to use this collection.

warning Use Restrictions

The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Contents of the Collection

Contains miscellaneous memoranda and newsletters accumulated during Carroll's second tenure at JWT. Also includes various thumbnail biographies of Carroll, written near the time of his 1968 retirement from JWT. Series was compiled from folders of miscellaneous materials.

Biographical files, 1968, 1973
Box 1
Memoranda and newsletters, 1961-1979 and undated
Box 1

Contains correspondence between Carroll Carroll, his JWT associates, clients and affiliated artists. Also includes correspondence between Carroll and the Office of War Information during the years 1942-1944 relating to radio programs that Carroll developed for entertaining the U.S. troops. An index of the letters, compiled in 1970, appears at the beginning of the series. Original folder titles and chronological arrangement were maintained.

Index of correspondence, 1970
Box 1
Correspondence, 1934-1956
(13 folders)
Box 1

Contains scripts used for radio and television series, as well as for brief radio announcements and humorous skits to be circulated among JWT employees. Includes scripts for three episodes of a proposed fictional television series, "Madison Avenue," which portrayed the lives of advertising executives in New York City. Items were removed from report folder covers, with original labels maintained, and organized alphabetically.

Ballad of Kenneth Hinks, undated
Box 1
Fiscal Century, 1964
Box 1
Episode 1
Box 1
Episode 2, Only a Rose
Box 1
Episode 3, Continue with Slumbermalts!
Box 1
Technique for Producing Ideas, 1967
Box 1
1886, undated
Box 1
Miscellaneous, 1958-1967 and undated
Box 1

Series contains speeches Carroll wrote for JWT meetings and company dinners. Original folder titles were maintained and materials were arranged alphabetically.

Creative Guideposts, undated
Box 1
London Joint Board of Directors meeting, 1967
Box 1
Remarks for Ford field meeting company dinner, 1967
Box 1
Think Young, 1968
Box 1

Includes cassette tape (closed to researchers for preservation reasons) and printed transcript of a 14 February 1973 interview of Carroll Carroll by Les Tremayne.

Interview with Carroll Carroll
Box 2
Audiocassette (Closed to researchers for preservation reasons: Use transcript)
Box 2
Transcript
Box 2

Includes lead sheets for advertising jingles with words and music primarily written by Carroll Carroll and Dick Manning. Includes some songs written by Carroll in collaboration with Manning and David Fleishhacker. Companies represented include Chase & Sanborn, Kodak, Rinso, Red Cross, Ford, 7-Up, and Shell. Items arrived in a single unlabeled folder. They were placed in individual folders by song and arranged alphabetically by author and title.

Get That Ever Lovin' Flavor, undated
Box 2
Give Kodak Gifts for Christmas, undated
Box 2
Hear It Perk In Your Cup, undated
Box 2
Rinso People Lead a Happy Life, undated
Box 2
Red Cross Is on the Job, undated
Box 2
Crocker-Citizen's Song, 1963
Box 2
Ford Fairlane For Sixty-Two, 1961
Box 2
Life Starts Looking Up, 1963-1964
Box 2
Pure Coffee Nectar, 1960
Box 2
7-Up, 1965
Box 2
Your Shell Station, 1959
Box 2
Falcon Song, 1959
Box 2

Historical Note

DateEvent(s)
1903Born Carroll S. Weinschenk, Bronx, N.Y.
1921-1926Chief copy writer, Sigmund Tann Agency
1926Free-lance magazine writer
1932Joined JWT New York office
1934Created and wrote Kraft Music Hour for JWT
1946Left JWT, became Vice President, Ward Wheelock advertising agency, Hollywood office
1957Returned to JWT, New York office
1968Retired from JWT
1968Instructor, New School for Social Research in New York, N.Y.
1991Died, West Hollywood, Calif.

Carroll Carroll grew up in Harlem, Buffalo, and Chicago. After graduating from Chicago's Hyde Park High School, he started work as chief copy writer at the advertising agency of Sigmund Tann, and stayed five years. Beginning in 1926, he worked as a freelance writer for several publications: the New Yorker, Life, Judge, College Humor, the Saturday Evening Post, and the New York World. He also ran a column in the magazine Canada Goblin, wrote review sketches for Garrick Gaieties, and was under contract to T. B. Harms as a lyric writer. For several years, he also contributed a rhymed motion picture review called "Cinemetric Review" to the Monday evening edition of New York Evening Sun.

In 1932, Carroll joined JWT, and subsequently went on the road with a JWT radio program featuring George Burns, Gracie Allen and Guy Lombardo. He eventually became Editorial Supervisor of all JWT radio shows, and helped produce many JWT comedy and variety shows, including Chase & Sanborn with Eddie Cantor. During his tenure at the JWT New York office, he also created and wrote a full hour variety program with Al Jolson known as "Shell Chateau," and collaborated on the "Rudy Vallee Hour." In 1934, he created and wrote the "Kraft Music Hall," when it featured Paul Whiteman and Deems Taylor, and moved to Los Angeles to continue it when Bing Crosby took over. In Hollywood, he wrote radio shows for Kraft, Ford, Shell, Old Gold, Elgin, Swift, Lux and Standard Brands.

In 1946, Carroll left JWT to become Vice President in charge of the Hollywood office of the Ward Wheelock Advertising Agency; there, he wrote and produced radio shows for Bob Crosby and Walter O'Keefe. He returned to JWT at the New York office in 1957. At that point, he produced three Chase & Sanborn hour-long NBC specials for radio, worked with print and broadcast advertising for accounts of Kodak, Shell, Listerine, Ford, Lever Brothers, Liggett & Myers, American Petroleum Institute, Irving Trust Company, and Warner-Lambert.

Carroll also ghost-wrote two books for Bob Hope: I Never Left Home; and So This Is Peace; and wrote the "Lux Radio Theatre" adaptation of I Never Left Home. He created many television specials, including the "Judy Garland Special" and the "20th Century Fox Hour." He retired from JWT in 1968.

Biographical Sketch from Original Finding Aid

In a letter to Variety editor Abel Green on Dec. 20, 1946, Carroll Carroll (1902-) defended the role of advertising men in radio. Responding to the frequent suggestion that responsibility for radio ought to return to the "showmen," Carroll wrote: "National advertisers and their agents do, today, exercise about 90% of the showmanship in radio...they would not be doing this if they were not better showmen and business men than those from whom they took over." A showman himself, Carroll's opinions are based on fourteen years of experience as a writer for some of the most popular radio programs of the day. He was involved with the young medium of radio when advertising personnel were largely responsible for the development, writing, and production of programs.

Becoming a member of the Broadcasting Department of the J. Walter Thompson Company in 1932, Carroll immediately went on the road with the "Burns and Allen--Guy Lombardo" program, an association which lasted for several years. During radio's golden age, Carroll Carroll was involved with all of J. Walter Thompson Company's comedy and variety shows, including: the "Chase and Sanborn Hour"; the "Rudy Vallee Hour"; and "Shell Chateau." He worked with such stars as Eddie Cantor, Joe Penner, Al Jolson, Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy.

In 1934 Carroll Carroll created and wrote the "Kraft Music Hall" featuring Paul Whiteman. When the program moved to Hollywood and Bing Crosby assumed the starring role in 1936, Carroll also moved west and took charge. For the next ten years he wrote for the "Kraft Music Hall," establishing a continuity of programming that made Crosby's style familiar and likeable--the essential factors, Carroll maintained, to the program's success.

During World War II "Kraft Music Hall" became a vehicle through which the government programs and policies were regularly announced. Participation in the war effort included the promotion of War Bonds, the Junior Red Cross, and WAAC enlistment. Credit for "Kraft Music Hall's" role in providing the American people with information about the War and encouraging enthusiasm for government campaigns, was given to Bing Crosby and Carroll Carroll. In addition to writing the scripts for "Kraft Music Hall," Carroll became a consultant to the Office of War Information on Oct. 28, 1942; was on the Writers' War Board; and in 1946 became a member of its successor organization, the Writers' Board.

Carroll Carroll did not limit himself to radio. He also wrote magazine articles, reviews, and ghosted for celebrities. Among his anonymous books are Bob Hope's I Never Left Home and So This is Peace. Upon retirement from J. Walter Thompson in 1968 he wrote a column for Variety on television advertisement and continued to write about the early days of radio.

Subject Headings

Related Material

Related Material

Related materials may be found in the following Hartman Center collections within the J. Walter Thompson Company Archives: the Colin Dawkins Papers; the Howard Henderson Papers; the Bertram Metter Papers; the Dan Seymour Papers; Biographical Information; the New York Office. Broadcasting Department Records (later the Radio and Television Department); the Microfilm Collection Radio Scripts; the World War II Advertising Collection; and Writings and Speeches.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], J. Walter Thompson Company. Carroll Carroll Papers, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University

Provenance

The Carroll Carroll Papers were received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a gift in 1982, 1993, 2004. The 1982 accession is comprised of photocopies of materials held at the Division of Rare Books and Special Collections, University of Wyoming.

Processing Information

Processed by Jessica Wood, September 2008

Encoded by Jessica Wood, September 2008

Accessions 82-413, 93-087, 2004-146 were merged into one collection, described in this finding aid.

Descriptive sources and standards used to create this inventory: DACS, EAD, NCEAD guidelines, and our local Style Guide.

This finding aid is NCEAD compliant.