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Guide to the Robert E. Lucas Papers, 1960-2004 and undated

Abstract

Economist at the University of Chicago and Nobel Prize laureate.

The Robert E. Lucas Papers span the years 1960-2004, and document the professional work and career of Lucas during his appointments at the Graduate School of Industrial Administration at Canegie-Mellon University, and at the Department of Economics at the University of Chicago. The collection is arranged into the following series: Correspondence; Professional Service; Research Files; and Teaching Material, with the most substantial material in the research series. Folders assembled and maintained by Lucas over many years contain notes, correspondence, drafts, clippings, reports, course and departmental files, and other material related to topics such as business cycles, monetary theory, rational expectations, economic growth, supply-side economics, and unemployment.

Descriptive Summary

Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University
Creator
Lucas, Robert E.
Title
Robert E. Lucas papers 1960-2004 and undated
Language of Material
English
Extent
22.8 Linear Feet, Approximately 13,875 Items
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

The Robert E. Lucas Papers span the years 1960-2004, and represent the professional work and career of Lucas during his appointments at the Graduate School of Industrial Administration at Canegie-Mellon University, and at the Department of Economics at the University of Chicago. The collection is arranged into the following series: Correspondence; Professional Service; Research Files; and Teaching Material. Lucas is best known for for having developed and applied the hypothesis of rational expectations, and thereby having transformed macroeconomic analysis and deepened the understanding of economic policy. His work in these and other areas is profiled in the Research Files Series, the most substantial of the collection. Folders assembled and maintained by Lucas over many years contain notes, correspondence, drafts, clippings, reports, and other material related to topics such as business cycles, monetary theory, rational expectations, economic growth, supply side economics, and unemployment. No less significant is the Correspondence Series, nine boxes of exchanges with such economists and colleagues such as Lucas' collaborators Edward C. Prescott and Thomas Sargent, as well as James Tobin, Neil Wallace, Karl Brunner, David Cass, Edmund S. Phelps, Robert J. Gordon, Robert J. Barro, Leonard A. Rapping and John B. Taylor. These letters amplify the documentation in the research files on Lucas' career and research, as well as topics and debates in economics in the 20th century.

In addition to documenting Lucas' work in theoretical economics, the collection also follows his professional activities through documents found in the Professional Service Series. Items relate to his participation on various committees, his editorial and presidential commitments, and his work with institutions such as the American Economic Association (AEA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).

Finally, the Teaching Material Series, offers administrative files and course materials, such as notes, transparencies and exam subjects, dating from the 1960s to the 1990s and relating to Lucas' academic departmental service and teaching career.

Detailed descriptions on the arrangement and content of each series can be found in the respective sections of this collection guide.

Administrative Information

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 48 business hours in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access Restrictions

Collection is restricted. Access is by permission for the lifetime of the donor.

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

All or portions of this collection may be housed off-site in Duke University's Library Service Center. The library may require up to 48 hours to retrieve these materials for research use.

Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library to use this collection.

warning Use Restrictions

The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Contents of the Collection

This correspondence series is predominantly constituted by letters between Lucas and his colleagues on research issues. With the exception of the final box, all the correspondence was filed by Lucas by year.

Constituted by Lucas' exchanges with professional colleagues on research matters, including comments on the work of other economists, debates on current issues, recommendations and advising exchanges. Among his most frequent correspondents are his collaborators Edward C. Prescott and Thomas Sargent, from the early days at the Graduate School of Industrial Administration at Carnegie-Mellon University (1963-1974), to the most recent years at the Department of Economics of the University of Chicago (1990s). Major twentieth-century economists such as James Tobin, Neil Wallace, Karl Brunner, David Cass, Edmund S. Phelps, Robert J. Gordon, Robert J. Barro, Leonard A. Rapping and John B. Taylor, among others, are represented by smaller amounts of correspondence. This subseries, then, is a rich source of information that contains a very large amount of material written by and received by Lucas throughout his career. Chronologically filed by Lucas by year.

1963-1971
(9 folders)
Box 1
1972-1975
(7 folders)
Box 2
1976-1978
(8 folders)
Box 3
1979-1981
(9 folders)
Box 4
1982-1984
(6 folders)
Box 5
1985-1988
(10 folders)
Box 6
1989-1992
(10 folders)
Box 7
1993-1995
(7 folders)
Box 8
1996-1998
(6 folders)
Box 9

Brief subseries that includes correspondence on specific subjects, much of it routine, which Lucas filed separately from his general correspondence files. Arranged in alphabetical order by last name or subject.

Meunich, Polemarchis and Weiss, 1976
Box 9
Requests and visits to give lectures, 1976-1986
Box 9
Taxes correspondence, 1989
Box 9

Contains materials concerning Lucas' connections to organisations involved with both the direction and funding of the discipline, and to other professional associations. Includes budget and committee meetings, correspondence, editorial and presidential duties, conference proceedings, and peer reviews written by Lucas for journal submissions. Arranged in alphabetical order by last name or subject.

American Economic Association (AEA) Commission on Graduate Education, 1991
Box 10
AEA, Committee and budget report, 2001-2003
(3 folders)
Box 10
AEA, Correspondence
Box 10
AEA, Journal of Political Economy editorship, 2001-2002
Box 10
AEA, Meeting, 2002
Box 10
AEA, Meeting, unemployment, 1977
Box 10
AEA, Presidential address, 2001-2002
(2 folders)
Box 10
AEA, Presidential reception, 2002-2003
Box 10
AEA, Statistics committee, 2002
Box 11
AEA, Status of women in the profession, 2001-2003
Box 11
Econometric Society, 1990, 1997-1998
Box 11
Econometric Society, 2000 World Congress, 2000
Box 11
Historical Society, 2002
Box 11
Journal of Economic Theory, 1971-1978
(5 folders)
Box 11
National Academy of Sciences, 1981-1982, 2004, undated
(2 folders)
Box 12
National Science Foundation, 1981
Box 12
NSF proposals, 1975-1979
Box 12
National Bureau of Economic Research conference, 1981
Box 12
Review of papers for journals, 1971-1979
(4 folders)
Box 12
Tobin venture - National Association for Business Economics, 1976-1986
Box 12

Contains extensive documentation related to Lucas' research and to the writing of his articles, papers, or book-length works. The series is divided into ten subseries that describe the wide range of Lucas' research and which are listed alphabetically: Business Cycles, Growth and Development, International Economics, Investment, Labor and Unemployment, Miscellaneous Subject Files, Monetary Theory, Prices, Rational Expectations, and Supply-Side Economics. It includes drafts, notes, comments and different versions of Lucas' papers, articles and books, with emphasis on monetary theory, business cycles and growth. Overall, the subseries is further enhanced by the frequent presence of related correspondence between Lucas and his co-authors or commentators, as well as printed materials (such as reports, clippings, reprints and journal articles) and writings by others, both published and unpublished, related to Lucas' research.

An equilibrium model of the business cycle, 1974
Box 13
Barro, Robert, 1974, 2000, undated
Box 13
Business cycle modeling, 1970s
Box 13
Cycle notes, 1994
Box 13
Directions of macroeconomics, 1979
Box 13
Equilibrium cycle, undated
Box 13
Linear economy, undated
Box 13
Lucas problem, undated
Box 13
Methods and problems in business cycle theory, 1980
Box 13
Models of business cycles, 1985-1987
Box 13
Output inflation tradeoffs, 1973
Box 14
Studies in business cycles, undated
Box 14
Time to build, 1980-1981
Box 14
Understanding business cycles, 1976-1979
(2 folders)
Box 14
Various articles, 1980s
Box 14
Capital flow from rich to poor countries, 1989-1990
(3 folders)
Box 14
Development drafts, undated
Box 14
Human capital, 1990, undated
(2 folders)
Box 14
Learning and growth, undated
Box 14
Making a miracle, 1991-1993
(2 folders)
Box 14
Optimal growth with many consumers, 1982
(3 folders)
Box 15
On the mechanics of economic development, 1985-1988
(5 folders)
Box 15
Rosen proposal, undated
Box 15
Sources of growth, 1990
Box 15
Substitution and growth, 1975
Box 15
Towards full employment and price stability, 1978
Box 16
World development indicators, 1983
Box 16
World development report, 1991
(2 folders)
Box 16
World real interest rates, 1990
Box 16
Asian financial crisis, 1999
Box 16
Exchange rate regimes, 1980
Box 16
Floating exchange rates, 1988
Box 16
Interest rates and currency prices in a two-country world, 1980s
(1 of 3 folders)
Box 16
Interest rates and currency prices in a two-country world, 1980s
(2-3 of 3 folders)
Box 17
Trade, undated
Box 17
Distributed lags and optimal investment policy, 1965
Box 17
Firm size, 1970s
Box 17
Investment under uncertainty, 1968-1969
Box 17
On the size distribution of business firms, 1977-1978
(3 folders)
Box 17
Equilibrium search and employment, 1970s
Box 18
Expectations and the neutrality of money, 1969-1970
Box 18
International evidence of output-inflation trade off, undated
Box 18
Labour supply, undated
(2 folders)
Box 18
Real wages, employment and inflation, 1960s
Box 18
Towards full employment and price stability, 1970s
Box 18
Unemployment insurance, 1990s
(2 folders)
Box 18
Unemployment policy, undated
Box 18
After Keynesian macroeconomics, 1977-1978
(3 folders)
Box 19
Capacity, overtime and investment, 1969
Box 19
Core, 1980
Box 19
Costs of inflation, 1981
Box 19
Development, undated
Box 19
Dominant firm model, 1966
Box 19
Drafts, undated
Box 19
Duality, undated
Box 19
Dynamic competitive analysis, 1977
Box 19
Efficient allocations, 1990
Box 19
Efficient distribution, 1991
Box 20
Equilibrium search and unemployment, 1973
Box 20
Inflation and price controls, 1974
Box 20
Letters, 1960-1970
Box 20
Loose papers, 1976-1977, 1992
Box 20
Lucas-Prescott monograph, undated
Box 20
Matching, 1975
Box 20
MIT notes, 1978
Box 20
Notes, 1970s
(2 folders)
Box 20
Notes on the Leiderman workshop, 1988
Box 20
NY Times columns, 1981
Box 20
Optimal policy, 1982
Box 21
Price systems, 1970s
Box 21
Principles of fiscal and monetary policy, 1984-1985
Box 21
Random earnings differences, 1990-1991
Box 21
Recursive competitive equilibrium, 1982
Box 21
Review of Skidelsdy volumes on Keynes, 1994
Box 21
Rules, discretion and the role of the economic advisor, 1978
Box 21
Scalator clauses, 1976-1977
Box 22
Schoonmaker, 1968
Box 22
Stanford, 1976
Box 22
Thesis topics, 1977
Box 22
Weiss problem, 1983
Box 22
Carnegie-Mellon notes, 1976
Box 22
Cash-in-advance economy, 1976
Box 22
Columbia notes, 1978
Box 22
Diamond inefficiency, 1977
Box 22
Equilibrium in a pure currency economy, 1978
(3 folders)
Box 22
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, 1996-1997
Box 22
Fluctuations, 1981
Box 23
Historical quantity of money, undated
Box 23
Labor hoarding, 1988
Box 23
Liquidity and interest rates, 1988
(2 folders)
Box 23
Liquidity effect, 1981
Box 23
Management conference, 1979
Box 23
Money demand in the U.S., 1987-1989
Box 23
Monetary shocks with prices set in advance, 1989-1990
Box 23
Monetary transmission mechanism, 1983
Box 23
Money, 1975-1977
(2 folders)
Box 23
Money and finance, 1983
Box 24
Money in a theory of finance, 1983
Box 24
Note on Wallace reformulation, liquity and interest rates, 1988
Box 24
Notes on monetary theory, 1988
(4 folders)
Box 24
Open market, 1980s
Box 24
Management conference, 1979
Box 24
Optimal fiscal and monetary policy, 1983
Box 24
Price fixing, 1979
Box 24
Project on monetary design, 1980
Box 25
Quantity theory of money, 1978-1980
(2 folders)
Box 25
Real effects of monetary shocks, 1992-1994
(4 folders)
Box 25
Reflections on contemporary macroeconomics, 1980
(1 of 2 folders)
Box 25
Reflections on contemporary macroeconomics, 1980
(2 of 2 folders)
Box 26
Topics on monetary theory, 1990
Box 26
Transactions, 1988
Box 26
Two illustrations of the quantity theory of money, 1979
Box 26
A note on price systems in infinite dimensional space, 1968-1970
(2 folders)
Box 26
Asset prices, 1989
Box 26
Asset prices in an exchange economy, 1970s
Box 26
Fixing prices, 1990
Box 26
Price fixing, 1979
(1 of 2 folders)
Box 26
Price fixing, 1979
(2 of 2 folders)
Box 27
Adaptive behavior, 1985-1986
(2 folders)
Box 27
Budget balance, 1977
Box 27
Economic practice, 1979
Box 27
Miscellaneous, 1974
Box 27
Optimal investment with rational expectations, 1968
Box 27
Santa Clara symposium, 1979-1980
Box 27
UCLA, 1980
Box 27
Efficient allocation, 1990s
Box 28
Efficiency and equality in a simple model of efficient unemployment insurance, 1993
Box 28
On efficiency and distribution, 1991
Box 28
On efficiency and distribution with private information, 1992
Box 28
Supply side economics, 1990
Box 28
Supply side economics: an analytical review, 1989
Box 28
Taxes calculations, 1989
Box 28
Taxes notes, 1989
Box 28
Financial sections, Christian Science Monitor, 1977 April
(5 items)
Box 28 Folder 1

The Administrative Files Subseries chiefly contains letters of recommendation and of reference and general reports related to departmental affairs. In the second subseries, course materials chiefly consist of course notes, transparencies, comments on students' work and exam subjects. Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Budget committee report, 1969
Box 29
Budget data - Carnegie-Mellon, 1968-1970
(2 folders)
Box 29
Budget general, 1969
Box 29
Budget report 1965-1969, 1968-1969
Box 29
Committee on academic tenure, 1971-1972
Box 29
Departmental matters, 1975-1983
(1-4 of 5 folders)
Box 29
Departmental matters, 1975-1983
(5 of 5 folders)
Box 30
Earhart Foundation, 1974
Box 30
Economics at Chicago, 1975-1977
Box 30
Edward C. Prescott, 1982
Box 30
Harberger party, 1991
Box 30
Letters of recommendation, 1979-1980
(2 folders)
Box 30
Letters of reference, 1967-1974
Box 30
Macro syllabus, 1994
Box 30
Policy committee, undated
(1 of 2 folders)
Box 30
Policy committe, undated
(2 of 2 folders)
Box 31
Recruiting 2000, circa 1999
Box 31
Space, 1979
Box 31
Teaching evaluation, 1972
Box 31
Tuition data, 1973
Box 31
Tuition changes, undated
(2 folders)
Box 31
UC committee, undated
Box 31
Advanced economic analysis, 1969-1970 and 2000
Box 31
Advanced theoretical economics, 1986-1993
Box 31
Applied econometrics, 1974
Box 31
Capital theory, 1997-1998
(2 folders)
Box 31
Control problems, 1994
Box 32
Dynamic systems sets, 1982-1985
Box 32
Economic development, 1984
Box 32
Economic growth, 1980
Box 32
Empirical growth, 1977-1978
Box 32
Equilibrium dynamics, 1991-1992
(2 folders)
Box 32
Fifth semester exam, 1970
Box 32
Fiscal, money and macro, 1990
Box 32
Fiscal and monetary policy, 1997
Box 32
G. Brenner notes, 1978
Box 32
Graduate student papers, 1979-1990
(9 of 13 folders)
Box 33
Graduate student papers, 1996-1998
(10-13 of 13 folders)
Box 34
Income, 1991-1995 and 1997
(2 folders)
Box 34
Income, asset pricing, 1990-1994
Box 34
Income, macro, 1997-1998
Box 35
Income, macro development, 1984-1988
Box 35
Labor markets, 1978-1984
Box 35
Linear dynamics, 1977-1982
Box 35
Macro, 1989-1994
(3 folders)
Box 35
Macro problems, 1977-1979 and undated
Box 35
Macro problems and draft textbook, 1967-1973 and undated
Box 36
Markov process probability, 1993
Box 36
Mathematical economics, 1971-1973
Box 36
Mathematical review, 1970
Box 36
Micro, macro, 1969
Box 36
Miscellaneous topics, 1995-1996
Box 36
Monetary theory, 1978-1981 and 1983
(2 folders)
Box 36
Money and banking, 1990-1994
(1-2 of 3 folders)
Box 36
Money and banking, 1990-1994
(3 of 3 folders)
Box 37
N-agent planning problem, 1997
Box 37
Neoclassical growth, 1976-1981
Box 37
Overhead for projector, undated
Box 37
Price theory, 1972-1973
Box 37
Probability, 1995 and 1998
Box 37
Probability lecture notes, 1965
Box 37
Problem tests, 1976 and 1984
Box 37
Public finance, 1991
Box 37
Reading lists, 1975-1983
Box 38
Resource allocation, 1968
Box 38
Recursive methods, undated
Box 38
Special topics in monetary theory, 1989
Box 38
Student papers, 1984 and undated
(2 folders)
Box 38
Syllabi, 1983-1984
Box 38
Time series problem, 1978
Box 38
Trade and growth, 1979-1984
Box 38
Trade and growth, public finance, 1978-1981
Box 38
Clippings
Oversize Folder 1

Historical Note

Robert Emerson Lucas Jr. was born September 15, 1937, in Yakima, Washington. He received his B.A. in History in 1959 and Ph.D. in Economics in 1964, both from the University of Chicago. He taught at the Graduate School of Industrial Administration at Carnegie-Mellon University from 1963 until 1975, when he returned to the University of Chicago. In 1980, he was named the John Dewey Distinguished Service Professor at University of Chicago. In 1995, he received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1995 for his work on macroeconomics.

Subject Headings

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Robert E. Lucas Papers, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University

Provenance

The Robert E. Lucas Papers were received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a gift in 2004.

Processing Information

Processed by Danilo Silva, Chris Payne, August 2010

Encoded by Paula Jeannet Mangiafico, Chris Payne, Danilo Silva, August 2010

Accession 2005-0063 is described in this finding aid.

Descriptive sources and standards used to create this inventory: DACS, EAD, NCEAD guidelines, and local Style Guide.

This finding aid is NCEAD compliant.