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Guide to the Lloyd Appleton Metzler Papers, 1937-1974

Abstract

Economist, University of Chicago faculty member, and consultant to a number of U.S. government agencies.

Collection spans the years 1937-1974 and consists chiefly of Metzler's correspondence, notes and drafts, printed material, course-related materials, and typed copies of works by Metzler and others. Significant correspondents include Paul Samuelson and Kenneth Arrow. Most items relate to his career as an economic consultant for several U.S. government agencies including the Federal Reserve Board (1940s). Others relate to his work as a professor of economics at the University of Chicago. Topics covered by his papers include post-World War II policy and planning, British-American economic negotiations after the war, German monetary reform, monetary aspects of international trade, exchange rates, income transfer, instability theories, and the application of mathematics to economic theory. Collection is minimally processed and may need further processing before materials can be used.

Descriptive Summary

Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University
Creator
Metzler, Lloyd A. (Lloyd Appleton).
Title
Lloyd Appleton Metzler papers, 1937-1974
Language of Material
English
Extent
14.0 Linear Feet, Approximately 10,300 Items
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

The Lloyd A. Metzler Papers span the years 1937-1974 and consist chiefly of professional correspondence, research notes ad drafts, printed material, teaching material, and typed drafts or reprints of works by Metzler and others. Significant correspondents include Moses Abramovitz, Kenneth Arrow, Harry Johnson, James Meade, and Paul Samuelson, with many letters, particularly between Meade, Metzler, and Johnson (1940s-1950s), containing in-depth exchanges about economics. There are a few exchanges with Gottfried Haberler on international trade. Several folders contain significant notes from Metzler's own student days at Harvard in the 1930s with Joseph Schumpeter, Wassily Leontief, and O. H. Taylor. Many items in the collection relate to Metzler's wartime service as an economic consultant for several U.S. government agencies including the Federal Reserve Board, as well as his post-war work with the Department of State and with the Secretary of the Treasury on monetary policy, among other issues. Other items relate to his work as a professor of economics at the University of Chicago, and offer insights into the views he held on economics in the context of the Chicago School. Topics represented by materials in the collection include post-World War II policy and planning, including British-American economic negotiations after the war and German monetary reform; monetary aspects of international trade; exchange rates; income transfer; instability theories; and the application of mathematics to economic theory. Some files of research notes and paper drafts contain unpublished work; one draft contains handwritten comments by Viner. Collection is minimally processed and needs further processing before materials can be used.

Administrative Information

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 48 business hours in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

All or portions of this collection may be housed off-site in Duke University's Library Service Center. The library may require up to 48 hours to retrieve these materials for research use.

Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library to use this collection.

warning Use Restrictions

The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Contents of the Collection

Former inventory containing more details on contents (though box arrangement no longer exactly applicable)
Box 1
Cowles' papers for the Activity Analysis Conference (early versions)
Box 1
Arrow's instability theorem (early version)
Box 1
The Chile Project, University of Chicago, 1956
Box 1
Sketches for papers
Box 1
Exclusively Federal Reserve print materials and papers
Box 2
International economics (courses and class notes), 1950s
Box 3
Theses
Box 3
Transparencies
Oversize Folder 1
Robert Mundell paper (circa 1964) on stability with comments by Metzler revealing his own views of Hicks and Samuelson's contributions
Box 3
Kenneth Arrow
Box 4
R. G. D. Allen
Box 4
Letters to Congressmen
Box 4
Post War Recovery by G. E. Robert Meyer, 1958
Box 4
Treasury Department correspondence
Box 5
Paul Samuelson correspondence; lengthy letter to Metzler on stability in relation to Samuelson and Hicks
Box 5
Metzler's papers, drafts of work
Box 5
International Economics exams and course information, 1951-1960
Box 5
Stability paper
Box 6
Graham's Theory of International Values
Box 6
Flexible exchange ratios and the theory of employment
Box 6
Tariffs, movements of international demand, and domestic prices
Box 6
Matrix theory notes (algebraic)
Box 6
The rate of interest on the marginal pursuit of capital
Box 6
World prosperity and the British balance of payments
Box 6
Volume of class notes from Joseph Schumpeter, Wassily Leontief, and O. H. Taylor, 1937-1938
Box 7
Division of History, Government and Economics. Division Examinations for the Degree of A. B., 1938-1939
Box 7
Post-War British debts
Box 7
Inventory cycle notes
Box 7
Foreign Trade Agreement Report by the Committee on Ways and Means, May 1945
Box 7
Material for Metzler's collected papers
Box 8
University of Chicago
Box 8
Toronto
Box 8
Department of State, 1949
Box 8
Harvard Economic Studies, Harvard University Press
Box 9
Harvard class readings, 1938-1939
Box 9
University of Chicago exams, reading lists, and course information, 1960s
Box 9
Collected papers
Box 10
Reports, 1945-1970s
Box 10
Federal Reserve material: working papers for staff, brochures, bulletins, research memos, 1943-1951
Box 10
Course exams
Box 11
Reading material
Box 11
Department of State correspondence (includes Metzler's biographical information)
Box 11

Historical Note

Lloyd Appleton Metzler was born in Kansas in 1913. As an economist he became known for his research on international trade, tariffs, the business cycle, macro-monetary theory, mathematical economics, and instability. The "Metzler paradox" relating to tariff theory was named for him, and in mathematical economics the "Metzler matrix" also bears his name. Graduating from Harvard in 1942, he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. He served as a consultant to several U.S. Government commissions and the Federal Reserve Board during World War II, and was a member of the Yale faculty from 1946-1947. He subsequently spent most of his career at the University of Chicago, where he was a Keynesian economist rather than following the Chicago School of thought. In 1973 Harvard University Press published Metzler's Collected Papers, which were chiefly written between 1941 and 1951. After 1952 a brain tumor presented major health problems and affected his scholarly output. Metzler was honored as a Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association in 1968. He died in 1980.

Subject Headings

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Lloyd Appleton Metzler Papers, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University

Provenance

The Lloyd Appleton Metzler Papers were received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a gift from Richard Appleton Metzler in October 1987.

Processing Information

Processed by Rubenstein Library staff, January 1988

Collection is minimally processed and needs further processing before materials can be used.

Encoded by Robert Carlson and Paula Jeannet Mangiafico, October 2009

Accessions 87-126 and 87-162 were merged into one collection, described in this finding aid.

Descriptive sources and standards used to create this inventory: DACS, EAD, NCEAD guidelines, and local Style Guide.

This finding aid is NCEAD compliant.