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Guide to the Newsreel of the Fifth Party Congress of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiter-Partei (Nazi Party), 1933

Abstract

The Nazi Nuremberg Rally Newsreel, 1933, consists of one black-and-white, silent, 31-minute Agfa newsreel print documenting the Fifth Party Congress of the Nazi Party, Nuremberg, August 30-September 3, 1933.

Descriptive Summary

Title
Newsreel of the Fifth Party Congress of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiter-Partei (Nazi Party), 1933
Extent
1.0 Linear feet
Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

The Newsreel of the Fifth Party Congress of the Nazi Party, 1933, consists of one 16mm, black-and-white, silent, 31-minute Agfa newsreel print documenting the 1933 Nuremberg Rally, August 30-September 3, 1933. Also known as the "Rally of Victory," the 1933 rally at Nuremberg is notable in several respects. It was the first Nazi rally following Hitler's rise to Chancellor earlier that year; it was the first featuring Albert Speer's designs for the Zeppelinfeld stadium; it was the first of the rallies filmed by Leni Riefenstahl, for Der Sieg des Glaubens (Victory of Faith); and it was the final rally before the Nazi leadership purge known as the Night of the Long Knives (June 30-July2, 1934), whose victims included Ernst Roehm. Roehm, the chief of staff of the Stormabteilung, is featured extensively, alongside Hitler, Hermann Goering, Rudolf Hess, Joseph Goebbels and other Nazi leadership, in this newsreel and in Der Sieg des Glaubens. Due to Roehm's presence in Riefenstahl's film, only one copy of Der Sieg des Glaubens has survived -- the others were destroyed on Adolf Hitler's orders following the purge. While Der Sieg des Glaubens used footage shot by Riefenstahl (who created the stylistically advanced propaganda landmark, Triumph of the Will, the next year) as well as newsreel sources similar to this Agfa newsreel, there is little if any overlap between the Agfa newsreel and Riefenstahl's 61-minute film, or between a similar 5-minute newsreel from 1933, Der Deutsche Reichstag zu Nuernberg.

The newsreel is available for viewing on YouTube: http://youtu.be/sZrk0YAAg94

Administrative Information

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 48 business hours in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Original audiovisual materials are closed to use. Use of these materials may require production of listening or viewing copies. Please contact a reference archivist before coming to use this collection.

The collection may contain materials to which the Acknowledgment of Legal Responsibilities and Privacy Rights form applies. Patrons must sign this form before using the collection.

All or portions of this collection may be housed off-site in Duke University's Library Service Center. The library may require up to 48-hours to retrieve these materials for research use.

Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library to use this collection.

warning Use Restrictions

This work is in the public domain. Contact Rubenstein Library Research Services for footage requests and associated costs.

Contents of the Collection

Original 16mm b&w print from negative, silent with intertitles
Box 1
Film-reel RL10141-F16-0001

Historical Note

After the Nazis assumed power in Germany in January 1933, they quickly seized control of German media outlets. The Ministry of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda, headed by Joseph Goebbels, regulated news media and broadcasting, filmmaking, radio, theater, and literature. Conceived of as a way to enforce Nazi doctrine and prepare Germany for eventual war, the Ministry's reach extended deep into the German psyche, driving anti-Jewish sentiment, territorial annexation, and ultimately World War II and the Holocaust. In this context the Agfa newsreel documenting the 1933 Nuremberg Rally demonstrates the Nazi regime's early efforts to control messaging in news footage, and viewed as a companion piece to Leni Riefenstahl's Der Sieg Des Glaubens, contributes to a greater understanding of Nazi propaganda in the early 1930s.

Subject Headings

Preferred Citation

Newsreel of the Fifth Party Congress of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiter-Partei (Nazi Party) 1933, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Provenance

The Newsreel of the Fifth Party Congress of the Nazi Party, 1933, was received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a gift on December 20, 1967, from Professor John Himes, Deptartment of Religion, Thiel College, Greenville, Pennsylvania.

Processing Information

Processed by: Craig Breaden, April 2014

Accessions described in this finding aid: 68-130.