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Guide to the Publicity Clock Company Advertising Cards and Brochures, circa 1920s and undated

Abstract

The Publicity Clock Company, an advertising firm in New York City from around 1915 to at least 1930, placed advertisements in local movie theaters by means of the Publicity Clock, a device that projected the image of a working clock face with a repeating sequence of advertisements displayed within the dial. Throughout the 1920s and perhaps later, the company was located at 105 West 40th Street and run for a number of years by Leslie Neuberger.

The collection includes chiefly advertising cards and brochures for the Publicity Clock Company. The collection also includes a holiday greeting card, a warning notice to advertisers, and a fill-in form postcard addressed to Ad-Traction Clock Co. Except for the postcard which was printed for use during the 1920s, none of the materials are dated.

Descriptive Summary

Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University
Creator
Publicity Clock Company.
Title
Publicity Clock Company Advertising Cards and Brochures circa 1920s and undated
Language of Material
English
Extent
0.1 Linear Feet, 8 Items
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

The collection includes chiefly advertising cards and brochures for the Publicity Clock Company. Each advertising item has an illustration of a theater audience with a Publicity Clock projecting a clock face and advertisement for the company itself next to the movie screen. The company name, address, and slogans, including "the best and most refined advertising medium of the present day" and "always before the eyes of the public," complete the company's advertisement. The two brochures, intended primarily for movie theater owners and managers, also explain in detail what the Publicity Clock was, how it worked, and the advantages of using the device. The collection also includes a holiday greeting card from the company, a warning notice to advertisers about people falsely claiming to be employees of Publicity Clock Co., and a fill-in form postcard addressed to Ad-Traction Clock Co. at the same mailing address as Publicity Clock Co. Except for the postcard which was printed for use during the 1920s, none of the materials are dated, although a different mailing address and device capacity of 8 rather than 12 advertisements suggest one brochure pre-dates 1919. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Advertising, Sales & Marketing History.

Administrative Information

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warning Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

All or portions of this collection may be housed off-site in Duke University's Library Service Center. The library may require up to 48 hours to retrieve these materials for research use.

Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library to use this collection.

warning Use Restrictions

The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Contents of the Collection

Historical Note

The Publicity Clock Company, an advertising firm in New York City from around 1915 to at least 1930, placed advertisements in local movie theaters by means of the Publicity Clock, a device that projected the image of a working clock face with a repeating sequence of advertisements displayed within the dial. The Publicity Clock Co. engaged advertisers, collected fees from them, and supplied the advertising transparencies for the device. Theaters received a portion of the proceeds for projecting the colorful image on the wall near the movie screen.

Throughout the 1920s and perhaps later, the company was located at 105 West 40th Street and run for a number of years by Leslie Neuberger, the brother of Roy R. Neuberger, the founder of Neuberger Berman. The mechanism that intermittently changed the advertisements was patented by John U. Barr on July 20, 1915, patent number 1,146,839. Although not represented in this collection, the company was later known for the slogan, "Let Time Tell Your Story."

Subject Headings

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Publicity Clock Company Advertising Cards and Brochures, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University

Provenance

The Publicity Clock Company Advertising Cards and Brochures were received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a purchase in 2009.

Processing Information

Processed by Danielle Moore, October 2010

Encoded by Danielle Moore, October 2010

Accession 2009-0252 is described in this finding aid.

Descriptive sources and standards used to create this inventory: DACS, EAD, NCEAD guidelines, and local Style Guide.

This finding aid is NCEAD compliant.