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Guide to the Ezekiel Skinner papers, 1834-1836

Abstract

Ezekiel Skinner (1777-1855) was a missionary and physician who worked in Monrovia, Liberia for the American Colonization Society during the 1830s. Although almost 60 years old, Skinner believed it was his duty to continue the work of his son, Benjamin Rush Skinner, who had died in Liberia a few years before. He returned to the United States in 1837.

This collection consists of 15 letters and other related documents (with typed transcripts) written by Dr. Ezekiel Skinner during his time working for the American Colonization Society in Liberia. Skinner travelled to Africa twice beginning in 1834 and finally returning to the United States in 1837. These letters cover both trips and provide information about the day-to-day challenges faced by the emigrants from the United States. The majority of the letters are addressed to his family and written in the style of a journal, but there are also retained copies of Skinner's official correspondence as an officer of the Society. The contents of the letters touch upon various topics such as living conditions, missionary work, interaction with native Africans, and medical care of the emigrants.

Descriptive Summary

Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University
Creator
Skinner, Ezekiel, 1777-1855
Title
Ezekiel Skinner papers 1834-1836
Language of Material
English
Extent
1.0 Linear Foot, 40 Items
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

This collection consists of 15 letters and other related documents (with typed transcripts) written by Dr. Ezekiel Skinner during his time working for the American Colonization Society in Liberia. Skinner travelled to Africa twice beginning in 1834 and finally returning to the United States in 1837. These letters cover both trips and provide information about the day-to-day challenges faced by the emigrants from the United States. The majority of the letters are addressed to his family and written in the style of a journal, but there are also retained copies of Skinner's official correspondence as an officer of the Society. The contents of the letters touch upon various topics such as living conditions, missionary work, interaction with native Africans, and medical care of the emigrants.

Administrative Information

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 48 business hours in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

All or portions of this collection may be housed off-site in Duke University's Library Service Center. The library may require up to 48 hours to retrieve these materials for research use.

Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library to use this collection.

warning Use Restrictions

The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Contents of the Collection

Series contains original letters from Skinner to his family and his correspondence on behalf of American Colonization Society.

Personal letters, 1834-1836
Box 1 Folder 1
American Colonization Society correspondence, 1834-1836
Box 1 Folder 2

Series includes typed transcripts of each family letter and of the American Colonization Society correspondence in the collection.

Typed transcripts: Personal letters, 1834-1836
Box 1 Folder 3
Typed transcripts: American Colonization Society correspondence, 1834-1836
Box 1 Folder 4

Historical Note

Ezekiel Skinner (1777-1855) was a missionary and physician who studied medicine under Benjamin Rush in Philadelphia. During the time period covered by this collection, Skinner was in Monrovia, Liberia working for the American Colonization Society. His first trip to Africa in 1834 was inspired by the death of his son Benjamin Rush Skinner, who was serving as a minister in Monrovia when he succumbed to illness in 1831. Although almost 60 years old, Skinner believed it was his duty to continue the work of his son. During his second trip he was appointed as an agent of the United States government to oversee settlement of new Liberian citizens arriving from the United States. He returned to the United States in 1837.

Subject Headings

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Ezekiel Skinner Papers, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Provenance

The Ezekiel Skinner papers were received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a purchase in April 2012.

Processing Information

Processed by Bob Malme, July 2012

Encoded by Bob Malme, July 2012

Accession(s) described in this finding aid: 2012-0073

Descriptive sources and standards used to create this inventory: DACS, EAD, NCEAD guidelines, and local Style Guide.

This finding aid is NCEAD compliant.