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Guide to the American Dance Festival Reference Collection, 1977 - 2000

Abstract

The American Dance Festival (ADF) serves the needs of dance, dancers, choreographers and professionals in dance-related fields by supporting the creation of new modern dance work; preserving modern dance heritage; building wider national and international audiences for modern dance; enhancing public understanding and appreciation of the art form; providing a sound scientific/aesthetic base for professional education and training of young dancers; and providing a forum for information on dance education. The American Dance Festival Reference Collection includes clippings, announcements, programs, and other materials pertaining to ADF performances and events held on the Duke University campus. This materials was collected from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

Descriptive Summary

Title
American Dance Festival Reference collection 1977 - 2000
Creator
Duke University. University Archives.
Extent
1.0 Linear Feet , 600 Items
Repository
University Archives, Duke University
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult University Archives, Duke University.
Language
English.

Collection Overview

The American Dance Festival Reference Collection includes clippings, announcements, programs, and other materials pertaining to ADF performances and events held on the Duke University campus. This materials was collected from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

Please note that the official repository for information about ADF is the American Dance Festival Archives.

Administrative Information

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 48 business hours in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access Restrictions

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

No restrictions.

warning Use Restrictions

Copyright for Official University records is held by Duke University; all other copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Contents of the Collection

American Dance Festival 65th Anniversary
Box 1
General information, clippings, flyers and programs, 1977-1981 (9 folders)
Box 1
Clippings, flyers, and programs, 1982-1986, 2000 (8 folders)
Box 2
The Black Tradition in American Modern Dance, ADF - North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching seminar, 1989
Box 2
American Dance Festival Durham, The First Fifteen, 1978-1992
Box 2
American Dance Festival History
Box 2

Historical Note

The American Dance Festival (ADF) is committed to serving the needs of dance, dancers, choreographers and professionals in dance-related fields. Remaining true to the goals of its founding artists, ADF's programs are developed based on its mission to: encourage and support the creation of new modern dance work by both established and emerging choreographers; preserve our modern dance heritage through continued presentation of classic works, as well as through archival efforts; build wider national and international audiences for modern dance; enhance public understanding and appreciation of the art form and its cultural and historical significance; provide a sound scientific/aesthetic base for professional education and training of young dancers and a forum for integrating and disseminating information on dance education.

In July 1934, the small town of Bennington, Vermont became the site of the Bennington School of Dance -- the precursor of the American Dance Festival. It was the laboratory in which four of the great modern dance second-generation pioneers (Martha Graham, Hanya Holm, Doris Humphrey, and Charles Weidman) could experiment, train students, and create the early works that made modern dance one of the great cultural triumphs of the twentieth century.

The Festival, directed by Martha Hill and Mary Josephine Shelly, remained in Bennington until 1942 (with a one-year sojourn to Mills College, California, in 1939). Despite the onset of World War II, Martha Graham spent the summers of 1943-1945 in residence in Bennington, and in 1946 Jos Limn brought his first company to Bennington. In 1947, Martha Hill initiated a pilot program at Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut, for dance teachers, college dance groups, and young dancers. Due to the success of that pilot program, the Connecticut College School of Dance/American Dance Festival opened officially in 1948. For the 1969 season the name became simply the American Dance Festival, and has been directed by Charles L. Reinhart ever since. In 1978, the ADF took over the sprawling green lawns, studios, offices, and dormitories of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina.

[Historical note adapted from the American Dance Festival web site.]

Subject Headings

Related Material

  • American Dance Festival Collection. (American Dance Festival Archives.)
  • Summer Session Records. (University Archives, Duke University.)
  • Connecticut College School of Dance & American Dance Festival Collection. (Connecticut College Archives.)

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], American Dance Festival Reference Collection, Duke University Archives, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Provenance

The American Dance Festival Reference Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources.

Processing Information

Collected and arranged by University Archives staff.

Encoded by Jill Katte, February 2005

Updated by Molly Bragg

This finding aid is NCEAD compliant.