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Guide to the Army Research Office--Durham (AROD) records, 1957-1982

Abstract

The Office of Ordnance Research (OOR), U.S. Army, a Class II military institution, established offices on the Duke University campus in June 1951. On January 16, 1961 the OOR ceased to exist and was instead re-designated as the Army Research Office-Durham (AROD) under the command of the Chief, Research and Development. The 1960s and 1970s saw a weakening in the working relationship between the military and the scientific communities. In the spring of 1975, ARO left the Duke campus and moved to the Research Triangle Park, ten miles southeast of Durham.

Collection contains materials pertaining to the mission and organization of the U.S. Army Office of Ordinance Research, the forerunner of the Army Research Office-Durham (AROD). The materials in the collection span the years 1957-1982.

Descriptive Summary

Repository
University Archives, Duke University
Creator
United States. Army Research Office--Durham.
Title
Army Research Office--Durham (AROD) records 1957-1982
Language of Material
English
Extent
2.7 Linear Feet, approx. 200 items
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

Collection contains materials pertaining to the mission and organization of the U.S. Army Office of Ordinance Research, the forerunner of the Army Research Office-Durham (AROD). Materials include summaries of the activities of the Duke/AROD coordination office for the fiscal years 1966, 1969-1971, and a scrapbook dated 1959. The scrapbook contains photographs of Duke officials, Ordnance office chiefs, various dedication events and ceremonies, event guest lists, official luncheons, and RTP exhibit, all from 1959. The materials in the collection span the years 1957-1982.

Administrative Information

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 48 business hours in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access Restrictions

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

Collection is open for research.

In off-site storage; 48 hours advance notice is required for use.

warning Use Restrictions

Copyright for Official University records is held by Duke University; all other copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Contents of the Collection

Army Research Office - Durham, 1963-1982
Box 1
"A Summary of Activities and Expenditures of the Duke/ARO-D Coordination Office During Fiscal Year 1966
Box 1
"A Summary of Activities and Expenditures of the Duke/ARO-D Coordination Office During Fiscal Year 1969
Box 1
"A Summary of Activities and Expenditures of the Duke/ARO-D Coordination Office During Fiscal Year 1970
Box 1
"A Summary of Activities and Expenditures of the Duke/ARO-D Coordination Office During Fiscal Year 1971
Box 1
Office of Ordinance Research: Synopsis of Philosophy and Operations, 1957 Jan.
Box 2
Proceedings of the Sixth Conference ofthe Design of Experiments in Army Research Development and Testing, 1961 Dec.
Box 2
A Historical Summary, 1961 Jan. 1-June 30
Box 2
A Historical Summary, 1961 July 1-Dec. 31
Box 2
A Historical Summary, 1962 Jan. 1-June 30
Box 2
Scrapbook, 1959
Box 3

Historical Note

The Office of Ordnance Research (OOR), U.S. Army, a Class II military institution, established offices on the Duke University campus in June 1951. Marcus E. Hobbs, Chairman of the Department of Chemistry, served as acting chief scientist until Tomas J. Killian took over in a permanent capacity. Hobbs was instrumental in developing the "skeleton of the organization" which continued throughout the life of the organization with only minor adjustments. The organization was divided into four main divisions chemistry, mathematics, engineering, and physics. Scientists to fill the top slots were drawn primarily from Duke University, with others from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, North Carolina State, and Virginia Polytech.

OOR first occupied the Hanes Mansion, but after 6 years, the burgeoning Office had outgrown the available space. In December 1958, OOR moved into a new building that was built for them on the Duke campus north of the School of Engineering. The OOR entered a lease arrangement with the University for the space helping to cover the cost of construction.

On January 16, 1961 the OOR ceased to exist and was instead re-designated as the Army Research Office-Durham (AROD) under the command of the Chief, Research and Development.

The 1960s and 1970s saw a weakening in the working relationship between the military and the scientific communities. In the spring of 1975 ARO left the Duke campus and moved to the Research Triangle Park ten miles southeast of Durham.

Subject Headings

Related Material

  • Marcus E. Hobbs Papers, 1935-1980 (Duke University Archives)
  • A. Kenneth Pye, Chancellor, Records and Papers, 1960-1983 (Duke University Archives)
  • Lucius A. Bigelow Papers, 1915-1973 (Duke University Archives)
  • Photograph Collection, 1861-2006 (Duke University Archives)
  • Douglas M. Knight Records, 1949-1970 (Duke University Archives)
  • Vice President for Business and Finance Records, 1962-1985 (Duke University Archives)
  • Terry Sanford Records and Papers, 1945-1998 (Duke University Archives)
  • A. Hollis Edens Records, 1949-1960 (Duke University Archives)
  • J. Deryl Hart Records, 1957-1980 (bulk 1960-1963) (Duke University Archives)

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Army Research Office--Durham (AROD) Records, Duke University Archives, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Provenance

The Army Research Office--Durham (AROD) records were received by the University Archives as a transfer in 1970, 1977, 1984.

Processing Information

Processed by Sherrie Bowser, October 2006

Encoded by Kimberly Sims, December 2006

Updated by Sherrie Bowser, March 2007

Re-processed and encoded by Kimberly Sims, April 2014

Multiple accessions were merged into one collection and described in this finding aid.

Descriptive sources and standards used to create this inventory: DACS, EAD, NCEAD guidelines, and our local Style Guide.

This finding aid is NCEAD compliant.