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Guide to the Campus Social Board records, 1999

Abstract

The purpose of Campus Social Board was to "plan and organize innovative, nonalcoholic events that [were] open to and welcome[d] everyone on Duke's campus."

Collection contains two copies of "Thinking Outside the Box: Ideas for Improving Student Life at Duke University." (1999) This report is the result of a survey of student opinions on campus social life.

Descriptive Summary

Repository
University Archives, Duke University
Creator
Duke University. Campus Social Board.
Title
Campus Social Board records, 1999
Language of Material
English
Extent
0.5 Linear Feet, 2 Items
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

Collection contains two copies of "Thinking Outside the Box: Ideas for Improving Student Life at Duke University." (1999) This report is the result of a survey of student opinions on campus social life.

Administrative Information

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 48 business hours in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access Restrictions

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

Collection is open for research.

warning Use Restrictions

Copyright for Official University records is held by Duke University; all other copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Contents of the Collection

"Thinking Outside the Box: Ideas for Improving Student Life at Duke University." (1999) (2 copies)
Box 1

Historical Note

taken from CSB homepage http://www.duke.edu/web/csb/

Campus Social Board (CSB) was founded in September of 1997 by Brandon Busteed, Duke '99, then a Duke junior. The purpose of CSB was to "plan and organize innovative, nonalcoholic events that [were] open to and welcome[d] everyone on Duke's campus." The group was originally structured as a forum for student group representatives to plan and collaborate on social events. Communication, cooperation, idea exchange, and resource sharing were key functions and objectives of the original CSB. Although initial response to the CSB idea-sharing model was positive, it became increasingly evident that the group meetings were not accomplishing all that was necessary to improve campus life at Duke.

In January of 1998, CSB moved into a new phase. Because it was clear that the original group forums were not adequate to achieve systemic change on campus, CSB adopted a new structure and redefined its mission. Thirteen full-time members were recruited, and the group embarked on an ambitious journey of "test" social events. The group decided that the only way to find out what social events were needed and wanted at Duke was to try them. A special emphasis was placed on organizing unique events and events that were either nonalcoholic or not dependent on alcohol. The events ranged from dance clubs to outdoor movies to comedy clubs, all held at different times in different places. Although some of the events were not successful, even the failures gave CSB great insight into social life at Duke and showed the members what changes needed to be made in the future.

In the fall of 1998, CSB found itself at a crucial point on the higher education timeline. Colleges across the nation were facing similar problems stemming from alcohol use and lack of social interaction. Although these issues captured the attention of the nation, little was being done to combat the true problems. Reactive solutions like stricter alcohol policies became common, but little attention was being given to the true causes of the problems. New and creative social options were needed to attract the attention of students who by default had learned to rely on alcohol as the best social option on campuses that were far from vibrant. In essence, the entire country needed to focus on college life and help students redefine what college needed to be.

For this reason, CSB designed and launched a major initiative created to examine social life at Duke and beyond. First, full-page ads ran in the campus newspaper, asking students to really think about their own ideas regarding social life and respond with comments and new ideas. Next, CSB members undertook a benchmarking project of twenty-five schools similar to Duke in an attempt to learn about social life elsewhere. A social space survey that garnered 1,800 responses was used to document the need for physical social space on campus. CSB members focused on individual long-term projects that focused the discussions about campus life several years down the road. Following this exhaustive look at where Duke was and where it needed to go, CSB compiled its results in a notebook that was presented to members of the Duke community at a brainstorming session in February of 1999. It was at this session that students, administrators, and faculty discussed the future of Duke and what would be needed to reinvent campus life.

Following the local Duke conference, three CSB seniors organized a national conference held at Duke in March and also founded a new nonprofit organization designed to take the work of CSB to the national level. The nonprofit, CIRCLe Network (College Initiatives to Reinvent Campus Life), was publicly launched at the national conference, a gathering of student leaders and administrators working to define campus problems and come up with new solutions. The Campus Social Board is currently (2007) not an active student organization.

Subject Headings

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Campus Social Board records, Duke University Archives, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Provenance

The Campus Social Board records were received by the University Archives as a transfer in 1999.

Processing Information

Processed by Sherrie Bowser, December 2007

Encoded by Sherrie Bowser, December 2007

Accession A99-14 is described in this finding aid.

Descriptive sources and standards used to create this inventory: DACS, EAD, NCEAD guidelines, and our local Style Guide.

This finding aid is NCEAD compliant.