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Guide to the School of Engineering Reference Collection, 1913-ongoing

Collection Overview

The School of Engineering Reference Collection contains files of clippings, articles, bulletins, reports, publications, and other materials about the School of Engineering. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

Descriptive Summary

Repository
University Archives, Duke University
Creator
Duke University. University Archives
Title
School of Engineering Reference collection 1913-ongoing
Language of Material
English
Extent
0.7 Linear Feet, 650 Items
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Administrative Information

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 48 business hours in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access Restrictions

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

Collection is open for research.

warning Use Restrictions

Copyright for Official University records is held by Duke University; all other copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Contents of the Collection

Administration, 1927-1978
Box 1
Alumni Memoirs, 1990 (includes short statements from Marie Foote Reel and Muriel Theodorsen Williams the first female graduates in Engineering)
Box 1
Assemblies, 1953-1979
Box 1
Catalogs and Bulletins, 1935-1989 (three folders)
Box 1
Classes, Class of ____
Box 1
Clippings, 1931-
Box 1
Egg Drop Contest, 1978-
Box 1
Engineering Club, 1913-1914
Box 1
Freshman Engineer Handbooks, 1950-1977
Box 1
Engineering Faculty Council, 2001
Box 1
History, General, 1943, 1999
Box 1
Society of Women Engineers, undated
Box 1
The Engineering Dispatch [newsletter], 1994
Box 1
Alumni Newsletter, 1963, 1966
Box 1
The Dukengineer
Box 1
Engineering Horizons, 1971-1974
Box 1
Research reports
Box 1
Progress Report, 2005
Box 1
Biochemical Engineering, Center for, 1988-
Box 1
Biochemical, Dept. of. 1970-
Box 1
Teer Library Dedication, 1984
Box 1
Teer Library Groundbreaking, 1982
Box 1
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Box 1
Civil and Environmental Engineering [newsletter] (2 folders)
Box 1
Civil and Environmental Engineering, brochures, etc.
Box 1
Electrical Engineering, Graduate Study, 1965-
Box 1
Mechanical Engineering, 1950-1965
Box 1

Historical Note

taken from Pratt School of Engineering website: http://www.pratt.duke.edu/about/history.php

The Pratt School of Engineering traces its history back to 1851 when Normal College, a forerunner of Duke University, advertised a Classical course which included engineering for seniors. Normal College became Trinity College in 1859 and engineering was introduced in 1887 and became a regular course offering in 1903.

When Trinity became Duke University in 1924, engineering underwent vigorous development.

Chronology List

DateEvent(s)
1927Civil and Electrical Engineering departments were established. Classrooms/labs located in Asbury building on East campus. Engineering students were housed in Southgate building on East campus.
1931Mechanical Engineering department established.
1937Departments of CE, EE, and ME were administratively grouped to form the Division of Engineering.
1939The University incorporated the Division of Engineering into the College of Engineering.
1946First women to graduate from the College of Engineering: Muriel Theodorsen Williams (EE) and Marie Foote Reel (EE).
1947Male Engineering students relocated to West Campus.
1948College of Engineering moves to West Campus and begins classes in new Engineering Building (Old Red), now Hudson Hall.
1960Doctor of Philosophy degree first offered in Electrical Engineering.
1964Doctor of Philosophy first offered in Civil Engineering.
1966College of Engineering changed to School of Engineering.
1968First black engineers to graduate from School of Engineering: Kenneth Spaulding Chestnut (CE) and Alfred J. Hooks (ME).
1971Department of Biomedical Engineering established — First BME Department established at a university in the United States — set the stage nationally for other BME Departments.
1984Nello L. Teer Library Building opens.
1992Engineering building, (Old Red) named Hudson Hall to honor Fitzgerald S. "Jerry" Hudson E'46.
1994Levine Science Research Center opens.
1999Kristina M. Johnson becomes first woman dean. Duke University School of Engineering named the Edmund T. Pratt Jr. School of Engineering for Edmund T. Pratt Jr. E'47.
2004Construction was completed on the Center for Interdisciplinary Engineering, Medicine and Applied Sciences in August. Pratt hosts dedication on November 18, 2004. Duke's Board of Trustees approve renaming CIEMAS in honor of Michael and Patty Fitzpatrick. CIEMAS is now formally known as the Fitzpatrick Center for Interdisciplinary Engineering, Medicine and Applied Sciences, informally dubbed the Fitzpatrick Center.

Subject Headings

Related Material

  • Aleksandar Sedmak Vesic papers, circa 1950-1982. (University Archives, Duke University.)
  • American Society of Civil Engineers, Duke University Chapter records, 1932-1983 (bulk 1944-1970). (University Archives, Duke University.)
  • Otto Meier, Jr., records and papers, 1931-1979. (University Archives. Duke University. )
  • School of Engineering records, 1931-1998. (University Archives, Duke University.)

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], School of Engineering Reference Collection, Duke University Archives, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Provenance

The School of Engineering Reference Collection was compiled from various sources by University Archives staff for reference and research.

Processing Information

Processed by Archives Staff, February 2008

Encoded by Sherrie Bowser, February 2008

Updated by Kimberly Sims, August 2010

Updated by Molly Bragg, August 2011

Descriptive sources and standards used to create this inventory: DACS, EAD, NCEAD guidelines, and our local Style Guide.

This finding aid is NCEAD compliant.