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Guide to the Science, Technology, and Human Values Program records, 1979-1984.

Abstract

The Science, Technology and Human Values program (STHV), formerly known as the Science, Society, and Human Values Program, was begun in 1979 by James F. Gifford and Seymour Mauskopf as a unique interdisciplinary program focused on developing a comprehensive view of science, medicine, and technology in social, historical, and ethical terms.

The collection contains director's files from 1979-1984 which include administrative and student correspondence, memoranda, student term papers, course syllabi and evaluations, and five cassette tapes of sessions at a STHV symposium on space travel. The collection also contains brochures for the Round Table on Science and Public Affairs, dated 1976-1983.

Descriptive Summary

Repository
University Archives, Duke University
Creator
Duke University. Science, Technology, and Human Values Program.
Title
Science, Technology, and Human Values Program records 1979-1984.
Language of Material
English
Extent
0.7 Linear Feet, 400 Items
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

The collection contains director's files from 1979-1984 which include administrative and student correspondence, memoranda, grade reports, student term papers, course syllabi and evaluations, and five cassette tapes of sessions at a STHV symposium on space travel. The collection also contains brochures for the Round Table on Science and Public Affairs, dated 1976-1983.

Administrative Information

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 48 business hours in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access Restrictions

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

In accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended, Duke University permits students to inspect their education records and limits the disclosure of personally identifiable information from education records.

warning Use Restrictions

Copyright for Official University records is held by Duke University; all other copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Contents of the Collection

Round Table on Science and Public Affairs brochures, 1976-1983
Box 1
Senior Seminar Proposals
Box 1
Senior Seminar "Genetics in Humanistic Perspective," 1979-1980
Box 1
Senior Seminar, 1980
Box 1
Senior Seminar, 1980-1981
Box 1
Senior Seminar, 1981-1982
Box 1
Senior Seminar, 1982-1983
Box 1
Senior Seminar, 1983-1984
Box 1
Correspondence (part 1), 1982-1983
Box 1
Correspondence (part 2), 1982-1983
Box 1
Students Correspondence (part 1), 1980-1983
Box 1
Students Correspondence (part 2), 1980-1983
Box 1
Our Future in Space, "What we must Believe to Colonize Space: The Competing Catechisms," Walter McDougall. 18 March 1987. Part 1.
Box 1
Our Future in Space, "What we must Believe to Colonize Space: The Competing Catechisms," Walter McDougall. 18 March 1987. Part 2.
Box 1
Our Future in Space. Robert Jastrow.
Box 1
Our Future in Space. Thomas Gold.
Box 1
Our Future in Space. Hans Mark and Plenary Session.
Box 1

Historical Note

The Science, Technology and Human Values program (STHV), formerly known as the Science, Society, and Human Values Program, was begun in 1979 by James F. Gifford and Seymour Mauskopf as a unique interdisciplinary program focused on developing a comprehensive view of science, medicine, and technology in social, historical, and ethical terms. This program, likely influenced by the annual Round Table on Science and Public Affairs held at Duke of which Mauskopf served on the Advisory Committee, sought to educate undergraduate students through a variety of courses in multiple disciplines which culminated in the year-long senior seminar. The program offered monthly dinners, seminars, and panel discussions often with visiting professors on current and emerging issues in science within a societal context. Topics included the expansion of computer use, the role of modern medicine, genetics in humanistic perspective, and worldwide health policies among other things. The program was terminated in 2003.

Subject Headings

Related Material

  • Inventory of the News Service Biographical Files, circa 1930s – 2004. (University Archives, Duke University.)
  • Inventory of the Thomas E. McCollough Papers, 1965-1997. (University Archives, Duke University.)

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Science, Technology, and Human Values Program Records, Duke University Archives, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Provenance

The Science, Technology, and Human Values Program records were received by the University Archives as a transfer in July 23, 1992.

Processing Information

Processed by Sally Sullivan, June 2008

Encoded by Sally Sullivan, June 2008

Accession UA92-77 is described in this finding aid.

Descriptive sources and standards used to create this inventory: DACS, EAD, NCEAD guidelines, and our local Style Guide.

This finding aid is NCEAD compliant.