Italian Poetry

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This is the second-largest subject area, with 7,617 records. The formats include many types: pamphlets, clippings, newspapers, periodicals, broadsides, small cards, and some manuscripts. In addition, 1,055 of these pieces are "per nozze" items.

Dates range from 1603 to 1943.

Mazzoni's chief area of interest was Italian poetry, so the depth of material in this group is no surprise. Virtually every major poet in Italian history is amply represented, and hundreds of minor ones as well. Medieval and Renaissance poets are well-represented, and many of the items from these periods are transcripts of original manuscripts, some of which may no longer exist because of losses to libraries during World War II. There are many rare pieces, including a first edition of Michelangelo's poetry, published post-humously by his grandson in 1623. Twentieth-century poets are less prevalent, though there are several important works by Saba and Pirandello.

Individual authors and critics include: Francesco Petrarca (A and S), Guido Cavalcanti, Angelo Poliziano, Gaspara Stampa, Vittoria Colonna, Ludovico Ariosto, Benedetto Menzini, Giovanni Battista di Negro, Giosue` Carducci (A and S), Giacomo Leopardi (A and S), Ugo Foscolo (A and S), Vincenzo Monti (A and S), Alessandro Adimari, Ippolito Nievo, Melchiorre Cesarotti, Filippo Turati, Giuseppe Chiarini, Guido Mazzoni, Ada Negri, Giuseppe Parini (A and S), Giovanni Pascoli (A and S), F. T. Marinetti, Aldo Palazzeschi, Ugo Ojetti, Pio Rajna, Severino Ferrari, Olindo Guerrini, Iginio Ugo Tarchetti, Neera, Gabriele D'Annunzio (A and S), and hundreds more well-known and unknown poets.

Because the pamphlet collection contains many thousands of items whose focus is poetry, every effort has been made to classify these items under the subject heading that defines them best: thus, poetry that has a historical event or a person as its central subject would most likely be found under a more specific subject heading such as "History" or "Biography." Odes to King Umberto of Italy, for example, fall under this latter category, because of their biographical interest. Some propagandistic poems may be found under "Italy -- Politics and government," such as those written in honor of Mussolini or of the Fascist Party.

Not included in this category are works in another original language (even if they are translated into Italian). Thus, poems by Baudelaire translated from French into Italian would be classified under "Literature." Also not included are Italian authors writing in another language; Petrarch's Latin works are also classified under "Literature."