News & Events

Upcoming Events

Monday, March 23, 2015

Sabine Hildebrandt, M.D., will present "The role of anatomists in the destruction of victims of National Socialism." 

Sabine Hildebrandt, M.D.The history of anatomy during the National Socialist (NS) period from 1933 to 1945 has only recently come under systematic investigation. Most German anatomists became members of the NS party, while other anatomists were persecuted for so-called “racial” or political reasons. Body procurement included increasing numbers of bodies of victims of the NS system. Anatomists used these bodies for teaching and research purposes, and thus played a decisive role in the NS regime’s intended utter annihilation of its perceived enemies. Current research is focused on the reconstruction of the victims’ identities and their dignified memorialization.

Dr. Hildebrandt is an assistant professor in the department of general pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital and a lecturer on global health and social medicine at Harvard Medical School.

The lecture will begin at 5:30 p.m. in Room 217 of Perkins Library and is open to the public. For more information, contact (919) 684-8549.

Find more about previous events including past speaker events.


Trent Associates Report


Exhibits

Explore past exhibits from the History of Medicine Collections including:

Animated Anatomies: The Human Body in Anatomical Texts from the 16th to 21st Centuries (April - July 2011)
Animated Anatomies explores the visually stunning and technically complex genre of printed texts and illustrations known as anatomical flap books.  This exhibit traces the flap book genre beginning with early examples from the sixteenth century, to the colorful “golden age” of complex flaps of the nineteenth century, and finally to the common children’s pop-up anatomy books of today. The display highlights the history of science, medical instruction, and the intricate art of bookmaking. To learn more about the symposium, exhibit, see photos of anatomical flap books, and watch videos of them in action, visit the exhibit website.

What Does Your Doctor Know? Exploring the History of Physician Education from Early Greek Theory to the Practice of Duke Medicine (April - July 2012)Duke School of Medicine
Medical knowledge was passed down through the ages first orally and then in written form, through informal apprenticeships and formal university education.  Certain core subjects like anatomy have been taught for over five hundred years, though the means of teaching has changed over time from oral tradition to physical autopsy to moving image recordings to virtual digital reconstruction.  How does the training a medical student receives today compare to the training a student would have received in a much earlier time, say in Padua, Italy, in 1543, or at the University of Pennsylvania in 1813? This exhibition highlights the transformation of physician education over time, from the days of ancient Greece through the establishment and evolution of Duke’s Medical School.