News & Events

Upcoming Events

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Croce"The Right to Remain Private: Challenges to Protecting Health Information in Historical Research."
5:30 p.m. Room 217, Perkins Library

Join us for a round table discussion on how the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) impacts research conducted in libraries and archives. Panelists include Cynthia Greenlee, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Richards Civil War Era Center and the Africana Research Center, Penn State; Phoebe Evans Letocha, Collections Management Archivist of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions; Laura Micham, Merle Hoffman Director of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture, Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University Libraries; Stephen Novak, Head of Archives & Special Collections at Columbia University’s Augustus C. Long Health Sciences Library; and Kevin Smith, Director of Copyright and Scholarly Communication, Duke University Libraries.

Scholars and researchers encounter issues with accessing information when researching 20th century materials containing sensitive health information. Archivists grapple with how to collect and describe sensitive health information. This roundtable discussion will discuss the legal and ethical implications of HIPAA and how to move forward in a scholarly community.
For more information, contact (919) 684-8549.

Find more about previous events including past speaker events.

Trent Associates Report


Explore past exhibits from the History of Medicine Collections including:

Animated Anatomies: The Human Body in Anatomical Texts from the 16th to 21st Centuries (April - July 2011)
Animated Anatomies explores the visually stunning and technically complex genre of printed texts and illustrations known as anatomical flap books.  This exhibit traces the flap book genre beginning with early examples from the sixteenth century, to the colorful “golden age” of complex flaps of the nineteenth century, and finally to the common children’s pop-up anatomy books of today. The display highlights the history of science, medical instruction, and the intricate art of bookmaking. To learn more about the symposium, exhibit, see photos of anatomical flap books, and watch videos of them in action, visit the exhibit website.

What Does Your Doctor Know? Exploring the History of Physician Education from Early Greek Theory to the Practice of Duke Medicine (April - July 2012)Duke School of Medicine
Medical knowledge was passed down through the ages first orally and then in written form, through informal apprenticeships and formal university education.  Certain core subjects like anatomy have been taught for over five hundred years, though the means of teaching has changed over time from oral tradition to physical autopsy to moving image recordings to virtual digital reconstruction.  How does the training a medical student receives today compare to the training a student would have received in a much earlier time, say in Padua, Italy, in 1543, or at the University of Pennsylvania in 1813? This exhibition highlights the transformation of physician education over time, from the days of ancient Greece through the establishment and evolution of Duke’s Medical School.