SSRI~ Workshop: Community-Partnered and Community-Engaged Research

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Tue, 2020-11-10 20:00
None
Engaging and partnering with community members and entities in research, sometimes in the form of research practice partnership (RPP), can be a powerful mechanism for fostering social change and ensuring that research is appropriately situated within context. This session will focus on what these and related concepts mean, the ways in which they can be relevant and meaningful for both researchers and community entities, core challenges encountered, and recommendations for enacting these principles in practice. Please click "More Event Information" (box below) to register.
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SSRI~ Workshop: Community-Partnered and Community-Engaged Research

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Tue, 2020-11-10 20:00
Tue, Nov 10, 2020
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Engaging and partnering with community members and entities in research, sometimes in the form of research practice partnership (RPP), can be a powerful mechanism for fostering social change and ensuring that research is appropriately situated within context. This session will focus on what these and related concepts mean, the ways in which they can be relevant and meaningful for both researchers and community entities, core challenges encountered, and recommendations for enacting these principles in practice. Please click "More Event Information" (box below) to register.

What to Read this Month

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Mon, 2020-10-26 14:26

Recommended reads from our New & Noteworthy and Contemporary Literature collections

The post What to Read this Month appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

What to Read this Month

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Mon, 2020-10-26 14:26

Recommended reads from our New & Noteworthy and Contemporary Literature collections

The post What to Read this Month appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Reading and Voting

Humanities - Mon, 2020-10-26 14:10

This is the last week for early voting! Did you know that Duke has an early voting location? It’s at the Karsh Alumni Center. You can learn more about your voting options at Duke Votes. If you want to learn more about what will be on your ballot, a good tool to use is vote411.org. To get you excited about voting, I wanted to share some titles about the history of voting and voting rights!

Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America by Ari Berman.

Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All by Martha S. Jones.

Why Vote?: Essential Questions about the Future of Elections in America by Daniel M. Shea.

The Women’s Suffrage Movement edited with an introduction by Sally Roesch Wagner ; foreword by Gloria Steinem.

Voting in Indian Country: The View from the Trenches by Jean Reith Schroedel.

Fragile Democracy: The Struggle over Race and Voting Rights in North Carolina by James L. Leloudis and Robert R. Korstad.

Citizenship beyond Nationality: Immigrants’ Right to Vote across the World by Luicy Pedroza.

Selma’s Bloody Sunday: Protest, Voting Rights, and the Struggle for Racial Equality by Robert A. Pratt.

Institutions and the Right to Vote in America by Martha E. Kropf.

Uncounted: The Crisis of Voter Suppression in the United States by Gilda R. Daniels.

Ballot Blocked: The Political Erosion of the Voting Rights Act by Jesse H. Rhodes.

Why They Marched: Untold Stories of the Women Who Fought for the Right to Vote by Susan Ware.

Oh and if you’re looking for something fun to do, there’s the recent The Voting Booth by Brandy Colbert. In fact Book Riot had a whole list this year of YA books about elections.

The post Reading and Voting appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

CDVS Workshop: Python for Data Science: Pandas 103

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2020-10-22 17:00
Online
Data exploration In Python using grouping and aggregation. This is an intermediate-level, live teaching session where you will learn how to use the Pandas module for exploring tablular (spreadsheet) data using the groupby() and pivot_table() functions, as well as some visualizations of results. Python can be a great option for exploration, analysis and visualization of tabular data, such as spreadsheets and CSV files, if you know which tools to use and how to get started. This workshop builds upon the introductory Pandas workshops I gave in Fall 2019 and Spring 2020. (Code repository. See below for recordings.) In Pandas 101, I covered the very basics of how to access your data in a Panda DataFrame and do some basic plotting. In Pandas 102, I introduced how to get data into a "tidy" form, and merge datasets (like doing an SQL JOIN). In this Pandas 103, I will show you some of the way you can explore patterns in data by aggretating across categories and time. This is similar to the process of data exploration in Tableau, but here with Python, Pandas and JupyterLab.
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CDVS Workshop: Python for Data Science: Pandas 103

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2020-10-22 17:00
Thu, Oct 22, 2020
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Data exploration In Python using grouping and aggregation. This is an intermediate-level, live teaching session where you will learn how to use the Pandas module for exploring tablular (spreadsheet) data using the groupby() and pivot_table() functions, as well as some visualizations of results. Python can be a great option for exploration, analysis and visualization of tabular data, such as spreadsheets and CSV files, if you know which tools to use and how to get started. This workshop builds upon the introductory Pandas workshops I gave in Fall 2019 and Spring 2020. (Code repository. See below for recordings.) In Pandas 101, I covered the very basics of how to access your data in a Panda DataFrame and do some basic plotting. In Pandas 102, I introduced how to get data into a "tidy" form, and merge datasets (like doing an SQL JOIN). In this Pandas 103, I will show you some of the way you can explore patterns in data by aggretating across categories and time. This is similar to the process of data exploration in Tableau, but here with Python, Pandas and JupyterLab.

Python for Data Science: Pandas 103

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2020-10-22 17:00
n/a

Data exploration In Python using grouping and aggregation. This is an intermediate-level, live teaching session where you will learn how to use the Pandas module for exploring tablular (spreadsheet) data using the groupby() and pivot_table() functions, as well as some visualizations of results.

Python can be a great option for exploration, analysis and visualization of tabular data, such as spreadsheets and CSV files, if you know which tools to use and how to get started. This workshop builds upon the introductory Pandas workshops I gave in Fall 2019 and Spring 2020. (Code repository. See below for recordings.) In Pandas 101, I covered the very basics of how to access your data in a Panda DataFrame and do some basic plotting. In Pandas 102, I introduced how to get data into a "tidy" form, and merge datasets (like doing an SQL JOIN). In this Pandas 103, I will show you some of the way you can explore patterns in data by aggretating across categories and time. This is similar to the process of data exploration in Tableau, but here with Python, Pandas and JupyterLab.

  • If you don't have any programming experience, or you have never used Python at all before, the material may be too confusing to be useful. I won't be teaching the language itself. 
  • If you have at least a little bit of Python exposure, but haven't used Pandas much or at all, I would advise watching at least the Spring 2020 Pandas 102 video before you attend. If you find that too advanced, or want a more complete introduction to Pandas, start instead with the Fall 2019 Intro to Pandas video.

Expectations: 

  • You will be expected to have your video on for at least part of the session, although we won't be doing any group work or sharing.
  • If you need help with something during the session, you'll be expected to share your screen.
  • You will be expected to arrive with the Anaconda Python distribution already installed on the machine you're Zooming from if you want to work along with me or do the exercises during the workshop!
    • They now call this the Anaconda Individual Edition, available for Mac, Windows, or LInux
    • I would advise installing just for yourself, not for all users (installs in your Users directory, and doesn't need administrator priviledges)
    • I will hold open Zoom walk-in hours for an hour before the workshop to help remotely troubleshoot installation issues. Email me at emonson@duke.edu to get the URL.

This event is offered virtually in accordance with Duke's Coronavirus events policies. A zoom link will be sent via email to registered participants to join the workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

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Make A Self-Care Zine

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2020-10-21 22:00
Online
A zine is a handmade magazine or mini-comic about anything you can imagine. In this workshop you'll be taught how to make your very own mini zine that will be all about how you're taking care of yourself in this pandemic. A quaran-zine, if you will. Think of it as a little journal of some things that have brought you joy, made you think, or helped you through this strange time. Show up with some paper (preferably 8.5×11), a pencil or pen, and scissors if you have them (we can work around that if you don't). This workshop is designed for people of all ages who enjoy writing and/or drawing. Families are definitely welcome!
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Make A Self-Care Zine

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2020-10-21 22:00
Wed, Oct 21, 2020
6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
A zine is a handmade magazine or mini-comic about anything you can imagine. In this workshop you'll be taught how to make your very own mini zine that will be all about how you're taking care of yourself in this pandemic. A quaran-zine, if you will. Think of it as a little journal of some things that have brought you joy, made you think, or helped you through this strange time. Show up with some paper (preferably 8.5×11), a pencil or pen, and scissors if you have them (we can work around that if you don't). This workshop is designed for people of all ages who enjoy writing and/or drawing. Families are definitely welcome!
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ONLINE: A Very Spooky Low Maintenance Book Club

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2020-10-21 16:00
Other (see event description)
n/a

Get in the halloween spirit with the Low Maintenance Book Club! For our October meeting, we'll discuss selections from the short story collection Things We Lost in the Fire: Stories by Mariana Enriquez. Named a Best Book of the Year by: Boston GlobePASTE Magazine, Words Without BordersGrub StreetRemezccla, and Entropy Magazine, these disquieting stories draw regular comparisons to Shirley Jackson.

We'll discuss the following stories during the meeting:

  • "Things We Lost in the Fire"
  • "Adela's House"
  • "The Inn"

This book is available online and in print from Duke University Libraries and print and audio at Durham County Library.

Please RSVP to receive a Zoom link to the meeting the morning of the event. 

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What to Read this Month: October 2020

Humanities - Wed, 2020-10-21 15:56

This month, as we enter into the throes of spooky season (midterms), we at the library would like to offer up another selection of new additions to our collection to check out. These picks represent a mix of books in our New & Noteworthy Collection, as well as our Overdrive collection. Books are being continually added to both of these collections, so as always, we encourage you to explore them to discover new and interesting reading material.

Leave the World Behind by Rumaan Alam. Alam’s novel, which was released earlier this month, has already been hailed as one of the best novels published this year by the likes of the New York Times and NPR. At once a suspenseful thriller and biting satire, it tells the story of two households who unexpectedly end up sharing a space during what is quite possibly the apocalypse. Amanda and Clay, a middle-class white couple from New York City, decide to take a summer vacation in a remote corner of Long Island, renting a home there. Things take a strange turn when the home’s owners, a wealthy Black couple named George and Ruth, suddenly arrive, taking refuge from what initially seems to be a citywide blackout. What follows is a suspenseful commentary on issues ranging from race to disaster response in contemporary American society, as the two families gradually begin to realize that a much larger and much more dire occurrence is unfolding before their very eyes. You can read/listen to reviews here and here.

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The Lost Family: How DNA Testing Is Upending Who We Are by Libby Copeland. In this nonfiction study of home DNA test kits, Copeland, a journalist, explores the myriad unintended yet far-reaching consequences that often come with spitting into a vial to discover one’s genetic origins. What is often perceived to be a harmless novelty, Copeland argues, can be anything but, and the harm caused by these kits wreak havoc both on the individual and societal level. Copeland discusses this harm at length, sharing accounts of people making startling familial revelations, including several discoveries about parentage and adoption. But even more gripping is the commentary on the cultural ramifications of commodifying the human genome: our conceptions of race and identity, the use of genetic data to solve crimes, and the troubling relationship between the practice of DNA testing and eugenics. You can read a review here and here.

 A Thousand Years of Persian Poetry

The Mirror of My Heart: a Thousand Years of Persian Poetry by Women, introduced and translated by Dick Davis. This anthology of Persian-language poems, many of which first appear in English here, abounds with epigrams and elegies. As the title suggests, the chronological period covered by this work is extremely broad, beginning in the Middle Ages and ending in the 21st century. While Persian poetry has been studied at length for centuries, the voices of women poets have often been overlooked, by academics and other readers alike, mainly due to systemic issues in both Persian and non-Persian culture. But Davis, in translating these works, makes clear for his audience that women have played an invaluable role in the history of Persian poetry, with their works often asserting perspectives and concepts hitherto largely unseen by English-speaking audiences. The poems offer unparalleled insight into the lives of Persian women from century to century, and even the oldest poems represented in this anthology are quite accessible to a modern audience, owing to their beautiful and careful coverage of timeless issues, such as love and loss. You can read reviews here and here.

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Who Gets in and Why: A Year Inside College Admissions by Jeffrey Selingo. In this book, education journalist Jeffrey Selingo seeks to break down the overarching factors in college admissions decisions by offering a behind-the-scenes look at the process at three selective colleges and universities. His ultimate conclusion is that the factors controlling the process are largely outside the individual applicant’s control, but his journey in making that somewhat disheartening point makes for a compelling read, as Selingo offers an effective deconstruction of the concept of meritocracy, while also providing commentary on its seemingly inextricable place in contemporary American culture. The book also serves as an interesting complement to another recent journalistic work on college admissions, Melissa Korn’s and Jennifer Levitz’s Unacceptable: Privilege, Deceit & the Making of the College Admissions Scandal, which is currently available as an audiobook in our Overdrive collection. You can read a review of Selingo’s book here and here.

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Culture Warlords: My Journey Into the Dark Web of White Supremacy by Talia Lavin. In this book, Talia Lavin, a freelance writer known for her works in publications such as the New Yorker, the Washington Post, and the New York Times, relays her in-depth investigation of online and offline white supremacist culture. Long the target of online far-right trolls for her Jewish identity and antifascist writings, Lavin describes her effort to infiltrate white supremacist spaces as a journey to find out what draws people—largely young, disaffected white men—into online, far-right culture. Over the course of this journey, Lavin adopts false identities to achieve this end, and the book proves to be a harrowing account of this dangerous movement and what makes it run. And throughout, Lavin provides a compelling story with the many insights she makes. While the book is often darkly humorous thanks to Lavin’s entertaining voice, it nonetheless contains a great deal of disturbing content related to violence and hatred, something readers should keep in mind. You can read a review here and watch an online discussion with Lavin hosted by New York’s Museum of Jewish Heritage here.

The post What to Read this Month: October 2020 appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

CDVS Workshop: Mapping in Tableau

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2020-10-21 14:00
Online
Tableau is a software package that is increasingly popular for creating striking visualizations, such as charts and graphs, from tabular data. It also has an increasing number of capabilities to create maps. Source data can include native geospatial files (such as shapefiles or GeoJSON files), but also tabular data (such as CSV or Excel files) that include locational values, such as place names or coordinate data. This workshop will cover how to create maps in Tableau and on ways to manipulate the data and to effectively symbolize it on a map.
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CDVS Workshop: Mapping in Tableau

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2020-10-21 14:00
Wed, Oct 21, 2020
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Tableau is a software package that is increasingly popular for creating striking visualizations, such as charts and graphs, from tabular data. It also has an increasing number of capabilities to create maps. Source data can include native geospatial files (such as shapefiles or GeoJSON files), but also tabular data (such as CSV or Excel files) that include locational values, such as place names or coordinate data. This workshop will cover how to create maps in Tableau and on ways to manipulate the data and to effectively symbolize it on a map.

Mapping in Tableau

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2020-10-21 14:00
n/a

Tableau is a software package that is increasingly popular for creating striking visualizations, such as charts and graphs, from tabular data. It also has an increasing number of capabilities to create maps. Source data can include native geospatial files (such as shapefiles or GeoJSON files), but also tabular data (such as CSV or Excel files) that include locational values, such as place names or coordinate data. This workshop will cover how to create maps in Tableau and on ways to manipulate the data and to effectively symbolize it on a map.

You can install Tableau for free as a university student: https://www.tableau.com/academic/students.  You need to have it installed before the class.  

This event is offered virtually in accordance with Duke's Coronavirus events policies. A zoom link will be sent via email to registered participants to join the workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. Registration for the workshop indicates consent. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

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Make a Self-Care Zine, Oct. 21

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Mon, 2020-10-19 15:38

Make your very own mini-zine about how you’re taking care of yourself in this pandemic

The post Make a Self-Care Zine, Oct. 21 appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Make a Self-Care Zine, Oct. 21

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Mon, 2020-10-19 15:38

Make your very own mini-zine about how you’re taking care of yourself in this pandemic

The post Make a Self-Care Zine, Oct. 21 appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Digital Humanities: Acquiring and Preparing a Corpus of Texts (RCR)

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Mon, 2020-10-19 13:00
n/a

Before you can undertake automated text analysis, it's necessary to obtain a corpus of digitized texts and, in many instances, take steps to prepare them for further processing. This hands-on digital humanities workshop focuses on the technical dimensions of corpus development. We will explore:

  • the risks and benefits of optical character recognition (OCR)
  • file formatting and naming issues
  • organization strategies for large corpora
  • problems of data cleaning and preparation
  • common sources for textual research data; and 
  • common legal concerns around the use of textual corpora.

This workshop is open to all graduate students and is offered for Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) credit as GS717.08. Priority registration will be given to students who intend to receive RCR credit.

Zoom information will be emailed to participants in advance of the session.

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