Perkins Library Tour for Parents

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Mon, 2019-08-19 18:00
Other (see event description)
West Campus

Take a tour with a Duke Librarian and learn about research services and resources students can access, along with study spaces where students can read, write, relax, create, and collaborate in our Libraries.

The tour will start at the Perkins Library Service Desk on the first floor of Perkins Library. 

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Perkins Library Tour for Parents

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Sun, 2019-08-18 18:00
Other (see event description)
West Campus

Take a tour with a Duke Librarian and learn about research services and resources students can access, along with study spaces where students can read, write, relax, create, and collaborate in our Libraries.

The tour will start at the Perkins Library Service Desk on the first floor of Perkins Library. 

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Low Maintenance Book Club reads "There There"

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2019-06-27 16:00
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

For the summer meeting of the Low Maintenance Book Club, we'll be discussing the 2019 Duke Summer Reads selection There There. It tells a powerful story of urban Native Americans confronting alcoholism, depression and unemployment amidst the historical backdrop of U.S. subjugation.

Copies of this book are available through the Duke Libraries (printonline and  e-audiobook) and from the Durham County Library (printlarge format print, ebook , e-audiobook and audiobook on CD).

We'll have light snacks (savory and sweet), and you're welcome to bring your lunch. Please RSVP if you plan to attend. 

**Please note a change in meeting location: Bostock 121, the Murthy Digital Studio 

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Low Maintenance Book Club reads "There There"

Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

For the summer meeting of the Low Maintenance Book Club, we'll be discussing the 2019 Duke Summer Reads selection There There. It tells a powerful story of urban Native Americans confronting alcoholism, depression and unemployment amidst the historical backdrop of U.S. subjugation.

Copies of this book are available through the Duke Libraries (printonline and  e-audiobook) and from the Durham County Library (printlarge format print, ebook , e-audiobook and audiobook on CD).

We'll have light snacks (savory and sweet), and you're welcome to bring your lunch. Please RSVP if you plan to attend. 

**Please note a change in meeting location: Bostock 121, the Murthy Digital Studio 

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Story+ 2019 Research Symposium

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2019-06-26 16:00
Smith Warehouse, Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall, Bay 4, C105
Announcing the 2019 Story+ Research Symposium! Wednesday, June 26, 2019, 12:00-3:30pm Lunch served at 11:45am Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall C105, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse Duke University At the Summer 2019 Story+ Research Symposium, Story+ teams will present their final products and/or research works-in-progress. This year our ten Story+ teams are spending six weeks unboxing curious artifacts in the Archives (including a lock of Walt Whitman's hair!), uncovering telling facts of social history at Duke and beyond (including its "stained" tobacco pasts), and remixing content into literary exhibitions, environmental podcasts, educational materials, 3D-printed stamps, musical liner notes, and social justice image archives. Their topics range from asylums to feminisms to 19th-century social media stars, and their proposed products range from podcasts to pedagogical materials. Their methods include textual analysis, visual analysis, archival/historical research, social media research, narrative analysis, cultural analysis, creative work, artistic practice, oral history, writing, and embodied performance. You can read more about our teams on our website (fhi.duke.edu/story) and via our Instagram (@DukeStoryPlus), which is 'taken over' by the teams during Story+. Story+ is offered through the FHI and Bass Connections, with support from the Duke University Libraries and Versatile Humanists at Duke.
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Story+ 2019 Research Symposium

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2019-06-26 16:00
Wed, Jun 26, 2019
12:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Announcing the 2019 Story+ Research Symposium! Wednesday, June 26, 2019, 12:00-3:30pm Lunch served at 11:45am Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall C105, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse Duke University At the Summer 2019 Story+ Research Symposium, Story+ teams will present their final products and/or research works-in-progress. This year our ten Story+ teams are spending six weeks unboxing curious artifacts in the Archives (including a lock of Walt Whitman's hair!), uncovering telling facts of social history at Duke and beyond (including its "stained" tobacco pasts), and remixing content into literary exhibitions, environmental podcasts, educational materials, 3D-printed stamps, musical liner notes, and social justice image archives. Their topics range from asylums to feminisms to 19th-century social media stars, and their proposed products range from podcasts to pedagogical materials. Their methods include textual analysis, visual analysis, archival/historical research, social media research, narrative analysis, cultural analysis, creative work, artistic practice, oral history, writing, and embodied performance. You can read more about our teams on our website (fhi.duke.edu/story) and via our Instagram (@DukeStoryPlus), which is 'taken over' by the teams during Story+. Story+ is offered through the FHI and Bass Connections, with support from the Duke University Libraries and Versatile Humanists at Duke.
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Data Sciencing our Journal Subscriptions

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Fri, 2019-06-14 20:36

Breaking the Bundle: Analyzing Duke’s Journal Subscriptions with the Data+ Summer Program

The post Data Sciencing our Journal Subscriptions appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Data Sciencing our Journal Subscriptions

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Fri, 2019-06-14 20:36

Breaking the Bundle: Analyzing Duke’s Journal Subscriptions with the Data+ Summer Program

The post Data Sciencing our Journal Subscriptions appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Revamping Our Loan Documentation

Preservation Underground - Fri, 2019-06-14 20:24

The library loans a large number of items from various collections to other libraries and museums each year for exhibitions. The typical loan agreement is for a small number of items (usually less than 10), but occasionally we get a loan request that is much larger. It is important to document the condition of each object that is borrowed, and we do this by creating a condition report. Condition reports document any pre-existing conditions of a collection item (or lack thereof) and help to establish the responsible party for any future damage. A good report allows anyone handling the object to check and compare the condition of the item as it is packed and moved between destinations.

There are no standards for the length or format of a condition report. For many years, our reports have taken the form of a simple text document that includes an object’s identifying information, a brief description, and notes about any condition issues. In addition to the report, we take photographs of the object and save them to a networked drive.

This form has served us well until now, but in the next year we are facing some much larger loans. We began to wonder if there was a way to more quickly and accurately document the condition of an item, while still maintaining good record keeping practices. In recent years, a number of conservators have developed methods for adding photographs and digital annotations to their condition reports. With the increased functionality and reduced cost of portable touch-screen devices, the time seemed right to experiment with new documentation methods.

[Click to Enlarge]At the most recent AIC Annual Meeting, I attended a talk by Katrina Rush, Associate Paintings Conservator at the The Menil Collection, on digital condition reporting using Apple devices. While the method she presented appeared viable for our needs, we needed to use hardware and software that could be fully supported by our IT department. We recently acquired a Surface Book 2, which combines the versatility of a laptop and a tablet in one Windows device. The accompanying stylus allows the user to precisely annotate images and the portability means that we can bring it along with the items as they travel. The attached camera could be useful for documenting the item outside the lab.

I began designing a new condition report template in Microsoft OneNote. This program allows us to include all the same information from the old form, as well as insert and annotate images. There are also some handy time-saving features like working checkboxes and timestamps. I have included an example of an item documented with the new form here.

At this stage in development, I am conducting “trial runs” with the new form and device. So far I have not been timing myself, but completing the report seems to go very quickly. For much larger loans, I have successfully tested workarounds using “mail merge” to generate the tables of bibliographic data for many items at once. I’ve found it very easy to fill out the fields and to drag and drop images into the form. While the drawing tools are extensive, it would probably be helpful to develop a standard legend of specific colors to describe common condition issues. Exporting the report to a more preservation-friendly file format (like PDF) is easy enough, but can require some adjustments to keep page breaks from splitting an image.

As this new documentation method gets more use, we will likely continue to adapt it. In the coming months I hope to share some of the lessons we learn and the resulting workflows on this blog.

The post Revamping Our Loan Documentation appeared first on Preservation Underground.

Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2019-06-14 19:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)
West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

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Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2019-06-14 18:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)
West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

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Data Sciencing our Journal Subscriptions

Bitstreams - Fri, 2019-06-14 16:23

descriptive imageThe ongoing tensions between academic institutions and publishers have been escalating the last few months, but those tensions have existed for many years. The term “Big Deal” has been coined to describe a long-standing, industry-wide practice of journal bundling that forces libraries to subscribe to unwanted and unneeded publications rather than paying more for a … Continue reading Data Sciencing our Journal Subscriptions

The post Data Sciencing our Journal Subscriptions appeared first on Bitstreams: The Digital Collections Blog.

Managing Sensitive Data

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2019-06-12 14:00
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

In the course of your research you may collect, interact with or analyze data that are considered “sensitive.”  In this workshop we will examine common sensitive data types, how Duke’s IRB and Information Technology Security Office (ITSO) expects you to protect that data throughout your project’s lifecycle and the resources available to you for sensitive data storage and analysis, data de-identification, and data archiving and sharing.

This workshop will count for Faculty and Staff RCR Credit

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Disrupted Maturation of the Microbiota and Metabolome among Extremely Preterm Infants with Postnatal Growth Failure

Scopus Query (for science portal) - Tue, 2019-06-11 00:33
Author(s):Younge, N.E. | Newgard, C.B. | Cotten, C.M. | Goldberg, R.N. | Muehlbauer, M.J. | Bain, J.R. | Stevens, R.D. | O’Connell, T.M. | Rawls, J.F. | Seed, P.C. | Ashley, P.L.<br>Publication year: 2019<br>Journal / Book title: Scientific Reports<br><br>Access <a href="https://www.scopus.com/results/results.url?sort=plf-f&src=s&nlo=1&nlr=20&nls=&affilName=duke&sid=50C4CC75DD91BE54EF957326B03AC936.WeLimyRvBMk2ky9SFKc8Q%3a330&sot=afnl&sdt=cl&cluster=scopubyr%2c%222016%22%2ct%2c%222015%22%2ct%2bscosubtype%2c%22ar%22%2ct%2c%22ip%22%2ct%2c%22re%22%2ct%2c%22ch%22%2ct%2bscosubjabbr%2c%22ARTS%22%2cf%2c%22ECON%22%2cf%2c%22BUSI%22%2cf&sl=207&s=%28AF-ID%28%22Duke+University%22+60008724%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22P.M.+Gross+Chemical+Laboratory%22+60019814%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+University+Marine+Laboratory%22+60020096%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+Institute+for+Genome+Sciences+%26+Policy%22+60076653%29%29&origin=rssreader">all results</a> for your search in Scopus<br>

The Art of Writing Letters

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Mon, 2019-06-10 12:40

A Q&A with Joanna Murdoch, a Ph.D. Candidate in the English Department

The post The Art of Writing Letters appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

The Art of Writing Letters

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Mon, 2019-06-10 12:40

A Q&A with Joanna Murdoch, a Ph.D. Candidate in the English Department

The post The Art of Writing Letters appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

The Art of Writing Letters: A Q&A with Joanna Murdoch

Humanities - Mon, 2019-06-10 12:33

“Working with the Library” is an occasional series of stories highlighting collaborations between librarians and the people around campus whose teaching and research we support.

Joanna Murdoch is a Ph.D. Candidate in the English Department. She taught a Thompson Writing Program first-year writing seminar called “The Art of Writing Letters” in the spring of 2018. Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, Head of the Humanities Section and Librarian for Literature and Theater Studies, served as the course librarian for this class. She had the pleasure of asking Joanna a couple of questions about how the library has supported her teaching and research.

What were your primary goals for your students in working with letter writing in this course?

Teaching for the Thompson Writing Program’s first-year writing seminar, I wanted to foreground the tangible longevity of academic writing. The claims we make and the words we use in essays, exhibits, or online forums can last a long time. Against the odds, a lot of written material survives! The assignments in my course ask students to think about their writing and research as taking part in conversations with long histories and long futures, too.

Letter writing, it turns out, is a good tool for cultivating the blend of voice, personhood, and responsibility that is crucial for compelling academic work but isn’t always explicitly handled in writing instruction. In almost any century, letters open with an address to a named person and close with the writer’s signoff. Between those extremities, letters and their composers do everything they can to try to reach their readers. For their part, the letter’s recipients face literal response-ability: they have to decide whether and how they are able to respond. Writing and reading in this view are intimate, implicating activities: words can’t convey ideas unless two human beings have already agreed to connect.

It’s easy to forget this interpersonal grounding when composing a college essay. But even the strictest cautions surrounding intellectual property and the respect and defense of human rights require us to acknowledge the voices of others. That’s why my students have been practicing discerning and responding to the historically situated human voice in other people’s writing over three major assignments—a close-reading analysis of a single letter, a research project on a letter exchange held at the Rubenstein or in Perkins’ collections or databases, and a letter to a public figure, exhibited on the Campus Club Wall for three weeks in April of 2018. 

How has the library supported your teaching?

In so many ways! Duke’s subscription to databases like North American Immigrant Letters, Diaries, and Oral Histories provided rich exploratory ground for my students in all stages of their writing projects. The library’s collections of World War I letters available in book form in the stacks gave students who stumbled across them the foundation they needed for their research on soldiers’ letters in the Rubenstein’s holdings. Then, in April, the Campus Club Wall in Perkins became a live part of our writing and learning space when students received permission to exhibit some visually enhanced selections from their letters to public figures.

But it was the library’s gifted specialists who really brought Perkins and Rubenstein to life for my class. Our designated Perkins librarian Arianne Hartsell-Gundy very graciously showed us how to use the library guide she had designed especially for our course, and she supported students with exercises for crafting a focused research question and building an annotated bibliography with reputable sources. I’ll always remember Perkins 118 as the place where Arianne showed us the lines from Alexander Hamilton’s letter-esque The Farmer Refuted (1775) that live on in Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton (2015).

A major highlight of the semester was when Rubenstein’s Elizabeth Dunn and Mandy Cooper introduced us to the historical letters and letter-writing guides they had hand-picked to match the students’ research interests. The hours these librarians spent selecting, transcribing, arranging, and expertly talking us through the materials were a huge gift to the class. Thank you, Perkins and Rubenstein!

How about your research?

For my research on medieval religious lyric poems, I lean heavily on Duke Libraries and their Borrow Direct and Interlibrary Loan relationships. My carrel is overflowing with Perkins, Divinity, and Lilly titles, plus others shipped in from Yale, the University of Chicago, or even our basketball competitor down the road. Thanks to the bases covered by Duke and these other library collections, this spring I was free to buy only the works I knew I would return to, rather than every single title on my comprehensive exams’ reading lists. The best part was when Perkins bought a collection of essays on Chaucer’s poetics at my request! I’d better go check it out, now that it’s on the shelves . . .

Another enormously helpful tool has been the library’s subscription to Oxford Bibliographies Online. Since I’m still in an early stage of dissertation research, I need all the overviews I can get of major contours in scholarly publishing. OBO is a great place to start.

What are three things you think that undergraduates should know about using information and the library?

I) You’re responsible for sniffing out the stories and scholarly drama behind the materials you see. If you do a lot of reading around for a project, you’ll start to see the same names and references to the same group of 10–30 major academic works. Then it’s like you’re pulling a necklace up out of the sand, revealing the links of a single, if complicated, structure. It’s one of the best feelings early on in graduate school, being not-at-the-mercy of the infinite-seeming database search results.

II) I said above that written material lasts longer than we think it will. But that doesn’t mean you’ll be able to actually use it once you’ve consigned it to your files. You may have terabytes of notes and essays on your computer or in the cloud, but you’ll never find any of it again unless you’ve tagged it all thoroughly or you like to spend your free time randomly clicking through old files. Some people love reference management software like RefWorks or Zotero. I can’t stand the way those services look, so I build massive searchable folders in an awesome writing program called Scrivener. Whatever you decide, leave yourself a lot of breadcrumbs. Don’t be like me and spend years searching for a half-remembered, haunting line that turned out to be from Leonard Cohen’s song “Anthem“: “There is a crack in everything / That’s how the light gets in”—I spent so long searching for the note I had made about it back before I learned to cite cite cite even passing references in journal-type notes. The best breadcrumb of all is a full bibliographic citation, including the date you found and read/listened to the material, plus a quick personal note on what you thought about it. The “find” function on your computer will do the rest.

III) If you need part-time work during a heavy course-load year, reshelving books for the library is a fantastic way to find a meditative groove while filling your muscle memory with clues about the way information is structured and accessed in a major university library—which boils down to the shape of academic discourse itself. That’s how it went for me, at least, in the basement stacks of the Yale music library. Maybe Duke will even let you listen to Hamilton or Leonard Cohen while you set some Perkins shelves to rights!

The post The Art of Writing Letters: A Q&A with Joanna Murdoch appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Acoustofluidic separation of cells and particles

Scopus Query (for science portal) - Mon, 2019-06-10 12:33
Author(s):Wu, M. | Ozcelik, A. | Rufo, J. | Wang, Z. | Fang, R. | Jun Huang, T.<br>Publication year: 2019<br>Journal / Book title: Microsystems and Nanoengineering<br><br>Access <a href="https://www.scopus.com/results/results.url?sort=plf-f&src=s&nlo=1&nlr=20&nls=&affilName=duke&sid=50C4CC75DD91BE54EF957326B03AC936.WeLimyRvBMk2ky9SFKc8Q%3a330&sot=afnl&sdt=cl&cluster=scopubyr%2c%222016%22%2ct%2c%222015%22%2ct%2bscosubtype%2c%22ar%22%2ct%2c%22ip%22%2ct%2c%22re%22%2ct%2c%22ch%22%2ct%2bscosubjabbr%2c%22ARTS%22%2cf%2c%22ECON%22%2cf%2c%22BUSI%22%2cf&sl=207&s=%28AF-ID%28%22Duke+University%22+60008724%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22P.M.+Gross+Chemical+Laboratory%22+60019814%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+University+Marine+Laboratory%22+60020096%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+Institute+for+Genome+Sciences+%26+Policy%22+60076653%29%29&origin=rssreader">all results</a> for your search in Scopus<br>

Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2019-06-07 19:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)
West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

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Exhibit Tours: Five Hundred Years of Women's Work

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2019-06-07 18:00
Rubenstein Library Mary Duke Biddle Room
Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection." Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. (Exceptions: tours not offered April 12 and May 10.) Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite in the Rubenstein Library and will last about 30 minutes. Please let us know if you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility.
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