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This is a combined feed of library-sponsored public events from the Events@Duke calendar and from all the various library event calendars.
Updated: 1 hour 13 min ago

Why Did the United States Medical School Admissions Quota for Jews End?

Thu, 2019-04-11 21:30
Thu, Apr 11, 2019
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
At the end of World War II anti-Semitic medical school admissions quotas were deeply entrenched in the United States. Twenty-five years later they were gone. Why did that happen and what are the implications for the current controversy regarding alleged quotas directed against Asian-Americans? Edward C. Halperin M.D., M.A., is Chancellor/Chief Executive Officer of the New York Medical College, Valhalla NY.

Foreseeable Flight: How have U.S. and Central America created regions of displacement?

Tue, 2019-04-09 16:00
Tue, Apr 09, 2019
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Award-winning journalist Óscar Martínez will talk about his latest book, "El Niño de Hollywood: Cómo Estados Unidos y El Salvador Moldearon a Un Sicario en la Mara Salvatrucha 13" (The Hollywood Kid: The Violent Life and Violent Death of an MS-13 Hitman), gangs in Central America, and the role the United States plays in the crisis of violence in Central America that leads to migrants fleeing the region. Martínez writes for ElFaro.net, the first online newspaper in Latin America. He is also the author of "A History of Violence: Living and Dying in Central America" and "The Beast: Riding the Rails and Dodging Narcos on the Migrant Trail," for which he won the WOLA-Duke Human Rights Book Award in 2013, among many others. Martínez is currently writing chronicles and articles for El Faro's project, Sala Negra, investigating gang violence in Latin America.
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Exhibit Tours: Five Hundred Years of Women's Work

Fri, 2019-04-05 18:00
Fri, Apr 05, 2019
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection." Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. (Exceptions: tours not offered April 12 and May 10.) Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite in the Rubenstein Library and will last about 30 minutes. Please let us know if you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility.

VFF: A Cornucopia of Interactive Graphics with Shiny and D3

Fri, 2019-04-05 16:00
Fri, Apr 05, 2019
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
While still a developing field, interactive statistical graphics have been a topic of interest since the late 1960s. Recent development of the R and JavaScript frameworks Shiny and D3 has made it much more accesible for statisticians and practitioners to have interactivity in their graphics, specifically for the web. While much of the work in interactive statistical graphics has focused on the general interactivity tasks of linking plots, brushing, labeling, and scaling, other work seeks to solve more specific data problems through the use of interactive statistical web graphics. In this talk I present three examples of the latter goal, as well as a brief overview of the steps needed to build a basic application that makes use of both Shiny and D3.
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Visualization Friday Forum

Fri, 2019-04-05 16:00
Fri, Apr 05, 2019
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

DVS Workshop: Open Workflow Tools: Open Science Framework

Wed, 2019-04-03 14:00
Wed, Apr 03, 2019
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Open Science is a growing movement that advocates for research to be transparent and openly available to all others for the purposes of engagement, validation, and extension. This workshop will present a brief overview of how researchers can make their workflows more transparent and open through the use of various tools. One particular tool and its features will be examined in depth - the Open Science Framework. The OSF has a variety of features that can help enable more open workflows as well as reproducible research practices.

DVS Workshop: Data Management 201: Preparing Data for Publishing

Tue, 2019-04-02 18:00
Tue, Apr 02, 2019
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Data management practices help researchers take care of their data throughout the entire research process from the planning phase to the end of a project when data might be shared or "published" within a repository. Building upon the foundational concepts covered in the data management 101 courses offered this year, this workshop will provide hands-on experience where participants will learn strategies for "curating" a dataset for formal sharing. Participants will identify common data issues, determine recommendations to optimize the dataset, generate metadata and documentation, and consider how these practices might be applied to their own research.

Exhibit Tours: Five Hundred Years of Women's Work

Fri, 2019-03-29 18:00
Fri, Mar 29, 2019
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection." Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. (Exceptions: tours not offered April 12 and May 10.) Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite in the Rubenstein Library and will last about 30 minutes. Please let us know if you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility.

The History of Visualization through the Rubenstein Library's Special Collections

Fri, 2019-03-29 16:00
Fri, Mar 29, 2019
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
In 1821, William Playfair critiqued Adam Smith's conclusions in The Wealth of Nations. He argued that, despite Smith's genius, his conclusions would have been much different had he used data visualizations. In my class, "Theories and Practices of Data Visualization," my students and I study data visualizations through history in order to understand how the data visualization methods that we now employ daily have developed over time. Of primary concern is how visualization technologies and techniques made data increasingly accessible to larger audiences, and became instrumental in broadcasting information, and, even in some cases, saving lives. In visiting the collections of Duke's Rubenstein Library, students examine and interact with historical visualizations in their original context. In this talk I will discuss the highlights of this collection and the consequences of studying the history of data visualization on the development of present-day visualization practices.
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Visualization Friday Forum

Fri, 2019-03-29 16:00
Fri, Mar 29, 2019
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

DHI Week | Danica Savonick: Feminist Genealogies of Digital Pedagogy

Thu, 2019-03-28 20:00
Thu, Mar 28, 2019
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Please join the Digital Humanities Initiative for the keynote presentation of DHI Week 2019! RSVP here: https://dhi-feminist.eventbrite.com A brief schedule is below. Full descriptions and schedules for our DHI Week events can be found here: https://digitalhumanities.duke.edu/dhi-week-2019 In this talk, Dr. Danica Savonick (SUNY Cortland) situates current conversations around digital pedagogy, public humanities, and student writing within a genealogy of feminist and anti-racist aesthetics and activism.
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DHI Week | Becoming a Versatile Humanist: Lessons from Duke PhD Alumni

Thu, 2019-03-28 16:00
Thu, Mar 28, 2019
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Please join the Digital Humanities Initative for the Thursday afternoon event in DHI Week 2019! RSVP: https://dhi-alumni.eventbrite.com 12:00 | Becoming a Versatile Humanist: Lessons from Duke PhD Alumni. Speakers: Elizabeth Baltes, Assistant Professor of Art History, Coastal Carolina University; Mitch Fraas, Curator, Special Collections, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania Libraries; Sandra van Ginhoven, Head, Project for the Study of Collecting and Provenance, Getty Research Institute; Andrew Ruoss, Faculty, Hotchkiss School. Lunch provided. Full descriptions and schedules for our DHI Week events can be found here: https://digitalhumanities.duke.edu/dhi-week-2019
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DHI Week | Engaged DH Pedagogies Outside the Classroom

Wed, 2019-03-27 14:30
Wed, Mar 27, 2019
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Please join the Digital Humanities Initative for the Wednesday events in DHI Week 2019! RSVP: https://dhi-pedagogy.eventbrite.com 10:30 | Engaged DH Pedagogies Outside the Classroom: Bass Connections Projects Panel. How do humanities faculty do digital research projects? Digital humanities projects challenge us as scholars and teachers to integrate our disciplinary expertise with novel--and perhaps unfamiliar--technologies and skills. This panel features Duke humanities faculty who have conducted collaborative digital research through Bass Connections, and related, programs. We will focus on how these projects are conceived, developed , and completed through a discussion of past and ongoing projects across three disciplines. This panel will feature Robin Kirk (Cultural Anthropology, Activating History), Charlotte Sussman (English, Representing Migration through Digital Humanities) and Andrew Janiak (Philosophy, Project Vox), and Jessica Hines (English, Visualizing Suffering). Moderated by Astrid Giugni (English, Data+). Full descriptions and schedules for our DHI Week events can be found here: https://digitalhumanities.duke.edu/dhi-week-2019
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The Newest Negroes: Black Doctors and the Desegregation of Harlem Hospital, 1919-1935

Tue, 2019-03-26 21:00
Tue, Mar 26, 2019
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
This lecture will focus on the desegregation of Harlem Hospital, highlighting the conflicts and tensions that took shape as black doctors sought to merge their professional goals with the larger cause of racial improvement.

DHI Week | Publishing In/With Hybrid Forms

Tue, 2019-03-26 16:00
Tue, Mar 26, 2019
12:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Please join the Digital Humanities Initiative for the Tuesday events in DHI Week 2019! RSVP here: https://dhi-publishing.eventbrite.com A brief schedule is below. Full descriptions and schedules for our DHI Week events can be found here: https://digitalhumanities.duke.edu/dhi-week-2019 Panel 1: 12:00 | Multimedia and Web Content in Monographs and Journals: New Options for Humanities Authors - Speakers: Kat Charron (NCSU), Jessica Ryan (Duke University Press), David Bell (Duke), and Liz Milewicz (Duke Libraries). Moderated by Sylvia Miller (FHI). 1:30 | Lunch Panel: 2:00 | Futuristic Publishing Forms for Digital and Hybrid Scholarship - Speakers: Helen Burgess (NCSU), David Zielinski (Duke), Aaron Kutnick (Duke), and John Herr (Duke Trinity Technology Services). Moderated by Amanda Starling Gould (FHI). 3:30 | VR/AR Demo with David J. Zielinski
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Triangle Digital Humanities Institute on Digital Humanities Pedagogy

Mon, 2019-03-25 04:00
Mon, Mar 25, 2019
All Day
Join the Triangle Digital Humanities Network (TDHN) for the first Triangle Digital Humanities Institute (TDHI)! This one-day event aims to build community and skills around digital humanities pedagogy. It will include lightning presentations, roundtables, workshops, and discussion sessions by and for instructors, staff (including, but not limited to, librarians and technologists), and graduate students at universities in the Triangle area. Topics will range from assessing the value of dh pedagogy, presenting classroom case studies, scaling research to fit the classroom, and creating open environments for experimentation to developing collaborative teaching models, designing dh assignments, integrating dh into learning objectives, grading digital projects, and building capacity beyond the individual classroom. Katherine Faull, Diane Jakacki, and Anne Kelly Knowles will offer feature presentations on their collectively vast pedagogical experiences in digital humanities and related fields. Local presenters will share examples from their own teaching, will foster practical discussions, and will offer resource sharing opportunities. The full schedule for the TDHI is here: http://triangledh.org/tdhi/ RSVP here: http://bit.ly/tdhi-ped The TDHI is the first in a week-long series of events. The full "DHI Week" schedule is here: https://digitalhumanities.duke.edu/dhi-week-2019
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VFF: Make Your Mark! Boost Effectiveness of Data-Driven Storytelling with New Visual Methods

Fri, 2019-03-22 16:00
Fri, Mar 22, 2019
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Whether sharing research insights, explaining a new product idea or solving a business problem, adding new visual communication methods to your tool box can help you "make your mark" at university, in academic research and business. TK George will share how enterprises like Google, IBM, GE, SAP and others are being driven by growing research that visual methods can tell data-driven, complex stories in ways that achieve faster business outcomes. These hands-on visual methods use images, text, shape and color to communicate, document or translate information to tell stories for enhanced understanding. The output (via digital, paper, video, etc.) is then used for learning, collecting and conveying user feedback, more effective business outcomes or for more interactive meetings. Methods George will cover include sketchnoting/visual notetaking, graphic recording, graphic facilitation and more.
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Visualization Friday Forum

Fri, 2019-03-22 16:00
Fri, Mar 22, 2019
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.

DVS Workshop: Data Management 101 for Scientists

Tue, 2019-03-19 18:00
Tue, Mar 19, 2019
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Scientists work with lots of data both big and small, and in many formats and systems. This workshop will introduce data management practices for scientists to consider and apply throughout the research lifecycle. Good data management practices pertaining to planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation will be presented through a sciences lens using discipline-based, concrete examples. While good general data management practices are relevant across disciplines, participants working specifically within the sciences are the intended audience for this workshop.

VFF: Deceptive Graphs: Quantifying the Truncation Effect in Bar Graphs & Exploring Interventions

Fri, 2019-03-08 17:00
Fri, Mar 08, 2019
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
We approach the question of potentially deceptive visualizations using the tools of experimental psychology. In a series of experiments, we quantify the effects of truncating the y-axis of bar graphs, which remains a common practice, despite being frowned upon by data visualization experts. We focus on relative judgments of quantity ("How different are A and B?"), rather than objective measures ("What is the value of X?"). We'll discuss our experimental design, results to date (spoiler: truncation matters!), and variations on the study, including studies recruiting PhD students in the quantitative fields and the humanities. I'll discuss our working definition of a "misleading graph," and how this might work might fit into existing work on misinformation. I'd love to solicit discussion and feedback on this paradigm from a non-psychological perspective.
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