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Updated: 58 min 11 sec ago

Getting Started with Sakai

Wed, 2018-08-15 17:00
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

This workshop is designed to give Duke faculty and staff preparing to use Sakai the knowledge necessary to create and manage a course or project site. During the session, we will provide an overview of Sakai basics, including the most commonly used tools and how to navigage the settings of a site.

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Getting Started with Sakai

Wed, 2018-06-27 17:00
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

This workshop is designed to give Duke faculty and staff preparing to use Sakai the knowledge necessary to create and manage a course or project site. During the session, we will provide an overview of Sakai basics, including the most commonly used tools and how to navigage the settings of a site.

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Final Day of The Activist Archive: SNCC Collections in the Rubenstein Library

Sun, 2018-06-17 04:00
None
The Activist Archive will displays selections from print and manuscript collections documenting the history of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) held in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library. SNCC was one of the key organizations of the Civil Rights Movement, and the only one organized and led by young people. Working alongside local people in the rural South, SNCC activists worked on issues like voting rights, education, economic empowerment, and the emergence of black power. The personal papers exhibited reflect the Rubenstein's commitment to collecting social movements and activism.
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Teaching with Time in Mind

Fri, 2018-05-25 14:00
Other (see event description)
East Campus

Teaching takes time and energy, two of our most precious and limited resources. In this workshop hosted by Faculty Write, we will discuss how to direct your time and energy to promote learning while also making time for your other responsibilities (especially writing). We will reflect on how you spent your teaching time this past academic year, and learn to plan to teach with time in mind for the year ahead. Discover principles and strategies that enhance efficiency and learning, and apply them to your course plans.

Workshop leader: Dr. Monique Dufour, an award-winning teacher with extensive experience in faculty development.

The workshop will be held in Art 100.

RSVP to jahern@duke.edu.

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The Menopause Monologues

Wed, 2018-05-23 19:00
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

“I’m going to pull menopause out into the open, remove the cobwebs, clean it off, and look at it” – Rosetta Reitz.(from Menopause: A Positive Approach. Rosetta Reitz (1924-2008). New York: Penguin Books, 1979, c1977, pg. 1.)

To bring an oft-taboo topic out into the open, you are cordially invited to a dramatic reading: The Menopause Monologues.

Excerpts from pertinent texts will bring to life the voices of women and men, past and present, whose perspectives on menopause range from “the historical to the hysterical.” In addition to the readings, individuals are also encouraged to share their own stories and experiences of “the change.” Light refreshments will be provided. The reading complements the Spring exhibition on display in the Josiah Charles Trent History of Medicine Room, The Change of Life: Menopause and Our Changing Perspectives. Curated by Erin Rutherford, Josiah Charles Trent Intern, the exhibition runs from March 20 – July 14, 2018. This program is co-sponsored by the History of Medicine Collections and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture.

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Mellon's Monograph Initiative and the Reassembling of Scholarly Communications [Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship Discussion Group]

Mon, 2018-05-21 16:00
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Monographs, long the apex of scholarly accomplishment in the humanities, have faced a crisis in recent years -- from diminishing markets for publishing these scholarly works, to insufficient technologies for capturing and disseminating the range of digitally inflected scholarship emerging from the humanities. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's Scholarly Communications Initiative awarded several grants (2014-2015) to encourage innovation and capacity-building in scholarly monograph publishing. "Reassembling Scholarly Communications," a 2017 report on this endeavor published by members of the Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing in The Journal of Electronic Publishing (volume 20, issue 1), uses final reports from those sponsored projects, conversations with project grantees, and a critical examination of these alongside discourse of the Mellon Foundation, to raise questions and highlight assumptions that underlie this initiative and its results. As part of The Edge's 2017-2018 series, Re: Publishing, this M&M discussion will examine these assumptions and the report findings, consider the implications for humanities publishing, and pose questions for ourselves about how long-form scholarship can be rewarded and sustained. 

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Designing the Digital Learning Experience

Thu, 2018-05-17 19:00
Bostock 024
West Campus

Looking for resources to create the best digital learning experience?  Join your colleagues on May 17th as Beth Phillips, Associate Professor and Interim Director, Institute for Educational Excellence, Duke School of Nursing, and Sophia Stone, Duke Learning Innovation facilitate a collaborative session of resource sharing and co-creation of instructional design guides you can use to plan, implement, and evaluate your own online and blended learning projects.

 

This meeting is part of the Duke Online Learning Collaborative (formerly the Distance Education Special Interest Group) and is open to all in the Duke community with an interest in digital education and online teaching and learning.

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Thomas More's _Dialogue of Comfort_ Gets Translated Yet Again [Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship Discussion Group]

Mon, 2018-05-14 16:00
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Mark DeLong (Director, Duke Research Computing) did some "digital humanities" back in 1986 with code developed using Borland's "TurboPascal" and data compiled by counting lines in an Everyman's Library Edition, derived from the 1557 edition of Thomas More's Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation. Following established digital humanities practices of the 1980s, DeLong misplaced both the Pascal code and the data he compiled. He did get a couple of pages in his dissertation out of the effort, which he now says was "not a good trade, given the amount of time the data compilation took."

Since 1986, More's work has been made available online (https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/17075), and Mark has learned Perl and some Python. In order to redeem himself from the horrors of bad data practices, he's returned to the project and hopes to deepen his now ancient scholarship on More's Dialogue of Comfort. At this Munch & Mull discussion, Mark will outline his current progress and opine about his transition from classic scholar to grey-haired, bow-tied digital hipster, perhaps shedding some light on a direction for (at least his) digital humanities work.

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Books as Social Networks: Documenting the Role of Individuals in the Production and Consumption of Print Culture in the West

Fri, 2018-05-11 17:00
Rubenstein Library 150
West Campus

 

Using rare books from the Rubenstein Library, this hands-on workshop will introduce participants to the discipline of Book History and explore methodologies for studying books as artifacts. We will explore evidence of the individuals involved in the production, distribution, and consumption of books in the West including authors, printers, illustrators, booksellers, and readers, from the 15th to the 20th century. Using this evidence, we'll consider what the roles of these individuals and the relationships between them can tell us about print culture in their time.  

The workshop will include a discussion of the kinds of evidence and strategies for investigation, followed by lab session devoted to the investigation of individual artifacts in the Rubenstein collection.

 

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Books as Social Networks: Documenting the Role of Individuals in the Production and Consumption of Print Culture

Fri, 2018-05-11 17:00
Rubenstein Library 150
West Campus

Using rare books from the Rubenstein Library, this hands-on workshop will introduce participants to the discipline of Book History and explore methodologies for studying books as artifacts. We will explore evidence of the individuals involved in the production, distribution, and consumption of books, including authors, printers, illustrators, booksellers, and readers. Using this evidence, we'll consider what the roles of these individuals and the relationships between them can tell us about print culture in their time.  

The workshop will include a discussion of the kinds of evidence and strategies for investigation and a lab session devoted to the investigation of individual artifacts in the Rubenstein collection.

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Duke Libraries Focus Group for Faculty

Wed, 2018-05-09 16:00
Perkins 118
West Campus

Your opinion counts! Join us for lunch, and share your thoughts about ways to improve and enhance library services, collections, and spaces in this one-hour moderated focus group.

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The Efficient Archival Researcher: Getting the Most Out of Your Visit

Tue, 2018-05-08 16:00
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

 

In this hands-on workshop, explore the challenges of working with published and unpublished archival materials. Learn to find appropriate archives for your research and what the procedures are for accessing collections. Gain experience handling rare materials from Duke’s Rubenstein Library and develop strategies for managing the many files and images you will collect when doing archival research. This session will also cover legal and ethical issues that surround accessing, using, and reproducing rare materials.

The workshop will begin with a lunch panel of researchers who will share the challenges and opportunities of their work in archives and special collections.

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Contraception Crossroads: Health Workers Encounter Family Planning in Mid-20th Century Latin America

Mon, 2018-04-30 16:00
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
Between the 1930s and the 1970s, health workers of different types began to embrace, slowly and selectively, the value of smaller families for all people in the region as well as to become used to new types of contraceptive technologies. What were the circumstances under which physicians, nurses, midwives, and social workers first encountered the use of birth control in Latin America? What they did do to advance and limit the use of contraception? How did they interact with birth control users? The answers to these questions help us better understand the context and the mindsets of people on the forefront of a momentous development: the normalization of family planning in the so-called Third World.
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Lunch and Learn about Two Historical Exhibits: The Silent Vigil and the Terry Sanford Change Leader for Duke

Fri, 2018-04-27 16:00
Rubenstein Library Breedlove Room 349
RSVP: mary.lindsley@duke.edu Historian and Public Policy professor Bob Korstad and Associate Dean of Communications and exhibit curator Karen Kemp will join forces to discuss the historical context and making of two current exhibits: The Silent Vigil currently on display in the Sanford lobby through mid-May, and Terry Sanford: A Change Leader for Duke, on display at the Mary Duke Biddle Room at Perkins Library through the end of June. Korstad's research interests include twentieth century U. S. history, labor history, African American history, and contemporary social policy, and he is the Associate Director of the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity. Pizza lunch provided to the first 20 respondents. RSVP: mary.lindsley@duke.edu
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New Features in Sakai 12

Tue, 2018-04-24 15:00
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

This demonstration workshop will cover new features in Sakai 12 including enhancements to Gradebook, Tests & Quizzes, and Chat.  The Commons tool, which is a new social tool similar to a Facebook wall, will be discussed in addition to new features in the editor allowing enhanced content embedding from tools outside of Sakai.

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Duke Libraries Focus Group for Graduate Students

Wed, 2018-04-18 18:00
Perkins 118
West Campus

Your opinion counts! Join us for Monuts Donuts and Joe Van Gogh coffee, and share your thoughts about ways to improve and enhance library services, collections, and spaces in this one-hour moderated focus group.

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Exploring Research Impact: Methods and Tools

Wed, 2018-04-18 18:00
Rubenstein Library 349 (Breedlove Conference Room)
West Campus

Join us on Wednesday, April 18 from 2:00-3:00pm for a workshop exploring the concepts and practices around research impact, or how your research papers, data, code, and other outputs are being used both inside and outside the academy. We will be exploring the basics of research impact measurement, such as h-index and journal impact factor and altmetrics. The workshop is hands-on. Bring a laptop and participate in using tools provided by the Duke Libraries to discover how your research is being talked about and used: your research impact.

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BRITE Ideas: Advancing the Science of Teaching and Learning

Wed, 2018-04-18 16:00
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

In this collection of lightning talks, faculty, grad students, and undergraduates will share BRITE ideas (Behavioral Research Informing Teaching Excellence). These are ideas for new research to tackle important problems in education and understand the social, emotional, and cognitive aspects of the learning environment. Join Dr. Bridgette Martin Hard and her students for this engaging event on teaching, research, and pedagogy. Come to listen, learn, and share your own ideas!

 

The BRITE Lab at Duke University aims to improve higher education by applying the theories and methods of psychology: the scientific study of the mind and behavior. Our research draws insights from the study of human cognition, emotion, social interaction, and culture to understand college students’ experiences and develop better educational practices. We use the tools of science to find out whether and why different educational methods work.

 

Note: Lunch is provided for those who register by April 14, 2018.

 

 

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Explore New Ideas for Blended Online Learning Models

Tue, 2018-04-17 16:00
Bostock 024
West Campus

Join your colleagues for a demonstration and Q&A with Sarah Weaver, MPH who will showcase a hybrid/blended program model, the Duke - Johnson & Johnson Nurse Leadership Program. Sarah will discuss approach, instructional design, technologies used, and program evaluation. You'll learn techniques you can apply to your own program model. The agenda also includes a discussion and open Q&A with Kevin Ragusa, Market Research Analyst for Duke Learning Innovation. Leveraging business analytics along with data on regional, national and international markets, Kevin researches the potential for new educational programs. This presentation is part of the Duke Distance Education group, open to all in the Duke community with an interest in online teaching and learning.

Date: April 17, 2018
Time: 12:00 - 1:00pm (bring your lunch)
Location: Bostock Library, Rm. 024
Questions? sophia.stone@duke.edu

 

 

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Ask An Archivist

Tue, 2018-04-17 15:00
Rubenstein Library 150
West Campus

Need tips on getting started with archival research? Curious how archives acquire collections? Thinking about archives as a career? Or just want to know what's up with the white gloves? Join us for a panel discussion with archivists from the Rubenstein Library.

 

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