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Updated: 19 hours 18 min ago

Community Blood Drive

Tue, 2020-01-07 15:00
Perkins Library, Korman Assembly Room, 217
The Duke University Libraries will host a community blood drive with the American Red Cross on January 7 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in Perkins Library Room 217. Please join our lifesaving mission and schedule an appointment today. Blood is a perishable product that can only come from volunteer blood donors. With someone in the U.S. needing blood every two seconds, blood products must be constantly replenished, according to the Red Cross. According to the Red Cross, donors with all blood types are needed, especially those with types O negative, A negative, and B negative. Click "More Event Information" below to schedule an appointment now.
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Promoting Skillful Learning: Addressing context, barriers, and challenges

Tue, 2020-01-07 14:00
Other (see event description)
West Campus

Objectives
1.    Practice generating feedback to sample student responses from metacognitive activities using the A-ACE feedback framework.
2.    Adapt feedback and expectations for student metacognitive growth based on their current stage of behavioral change.

Description
When we engage students in their metacognitive development, we will have to give them feedback to aid their growth. Such feedback can be hard for students to hear and accept. Giving good feedback that is both sensitive to students and constructively promotes growth can also be hard to generate.  In this face-to-face workshop session participants will practice assessing sample student responses to prompts about their metacognitive awareness and behaviors. Then participants will practice generating positive and constructive formative feedback based on the A-ACE  (Acknowledge-Affirm-Challenge-Encourage) feedback framework. We will also introduce a stage model of behavior change and use it to adapt feedback based on a students’ stage of change. Significant time will also be devoted to engaging participants in discussing and formulating strategies to deal with other barriers and challenges specific to their contexts. 
 

Workshop Leaders: 

Dr. Patrick Cunningham, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Dr. Holly M. Matusovich, Associate Professor of Engineering Education
Virginia Tech

Dr. Rachel McCord, Lecturer and Research Assistant Professor in the Engineering Fundamentals Program,
University of Tennessee

This workshop will take place in Teer 203. Continental breakfast will be provided. 

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Promoting Skillful Learning: Designing Activities for Metacognitive Growth

Mon, 2020-01-06 14:00
Other (see event description)
West Campus

Objectives
1.    Name a primary metacognitive learning objective for students and explain the reasoning behind it.
2.    Describe the salient elements of the context of the activity.
3.    Outline the activities to engage students in the metacognitive learning objective and the products providing evidence for it.
4.    Draft supporting materials for the metacognitive activities.

Description
In this extended face-to-face workshop session, participants will commit to a specific metacognitive learning objective to implement with students in a specific learning context. This builds directly from the definition of metacognition built during the previous virtual workshop. The goal of this interactive working session is to guide participants through the process of constructing an outline of a complete metacognitive activity to meet the identified objective. This includes identifying what students will do and what products they will produce that will provide evidence for attaining the objective. For example, within a foundational engineering course, the objective may be to help students adopt and use learning strategies associated with deeper learning. To do this we could develop specific in-class practice with three relevant strategies, such as, retrieval practice, working and explaining what-if extensions to example problems, and creating a concept map of course concepts. Evidence that students are doing what-if extensions could include a short video identifying their what-if question and explaining their solution. Once participants design their metacognitive activity, they will have a model of the process that can be replicated to develop additional activities.

Workshop Leaders: 

Dr. Patrick Cunningham, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Dr. Holly M. Matusovich, Associate Professor of Engineering Education
Virginia Tech

Dr. Rachel McCord, Lecturer and Research Assistant Professor in the Engineering Fundamentals Program,
University of Tennessee

Please note: This workshop is from 9 to 1, and then resumes from 3 to 4:30 pm in Teer 203. Breakfast, lunch and snacks will be provided. 

 

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Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tue, 2019-12-31 18:30
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help. 

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Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tue, 2019-12-24 18:30
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help. 

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Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tue, 2019-12-17 18:30
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help. 

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The Empowered Author: Negotiating Contracts and Navigating the Scholarly Publishing Ecosystem

Thu, 2019-12-12 19:00
Lilly Library Training Room
Publishing contracts form the basis for almost every aspect of how your book or article will be edited, produced, and disseminated. This workshop is about how to work with your publisher to maximize the effectiveness of your contract. Not all publishers are alike, but with most university presses, the negotiation need not be adversarial; we will talk about how to find ways to meet your and your publishers' objectives. We will discuss all major components of traditional publishing contracts, what your rights and obligations are as well as your publisher's, while also addressing additional features such as new open access opportunities and rights reversion clauses. This workshop is offered in collaboration with Duke's Office of Scientific Integrity, Advancing Scientific Integrity, Services and Training (ASIST). This event fulfills the Responsible Conduct of Research Requirement for Duke faculty and staff. Speakers include: Cathy Rimer-Surles Assistant Director for Contracts and Intellectual Property Duke University Press Arnetta Girardeau Copyright & Information Policy Consultant Duke University Library Dave Hansen Lead Copyright & Information Policy Officer, Associate University Librarian for Research, Collections & Scholarly Communication Duke University Libraries Register Here: https://duke.libcal.com/event/6086841
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Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tue, 2019-12-10 18:30
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help. 

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Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom: MOOC Discussion

Tue, 2019-12-10 17:00
Bostock 039
West Campus

This informal brown-bag discussion will center on the learning experience in the free open online course "Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom," created by Cornell University Center for Teaching Innovation, and hosted on the edX platform from November 4 - December 9, 2019. This online course for higher education instructors focuses on how to create and sustain inclusive, student-centered learning environments.

Read more about the online course here, and register for the edX MOOC (for free) here.

Those who are taking the online course are welcome to gather Tuesdays 12-1 PM, to discuss the content and activities from the prior week of the course. Attending these discussions is optional, of course - you are free to participate in the MOOC without joining these in-person discussions. 

  • Tuesday 11/12 - discuss the November 4-11 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/19 - discuss the November 11-18 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/26 - discuss the November 18-25 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 12/3 - discuss the November 25-December 2 course activities and readings. 
  • Tuesday 12/10 - discuss the December 3-9 course activities and readings.

You're welcome to bring your own lunch and drink; we'll provide dessert. 

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Cancelled - Managing Your Course with Kits

Mon, 2019-12-09 18:00
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

This event is cancelled.

Are you using two or more learning apps to teach your course?  Maybe even three apps or more such as WordPress, Box, and Warpwire?  Kits is a new learning platform at Duke that that makes finding and sharing learning apps with your students easy.  Attend this workshop to learn the basics of Kits such as adding apps, managing participants, and sending notifications.

Learn more about Kits in Learning Innovation’s recent blog post.

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Managing Your Course with Kits

Mon, 2019-12-09 18:00
Bostock 023 Training Room
West Campus

Are you using two or more learning apps to teach your course?  Maybe even three apps or more such as WordPress, Box, and Warpwire?  Kits is a new learning platform at Duke that that makes finding and sharing learning apps with your students easy.  Attend this workshop to learn the basics of Kits such as adding apps, managing participants, and sending notifications.

Learn more about Kits in Learning Innovation’s recent blog post.

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Promoting Skillful Learning: What is metacognition and where to start with students?

Mon, 2019-12-09 16:00
Other (see event description)
West Campus

Workshop Objectives

1. Define key elements of metacognition

2. Give an example and explain how you have seen or experienced a benefit of metacognition

3. Give an example and explain how you have seen or experienced one common metacognitive struggle (deficiency/limitation/growth area)

Description Metacognition is integral to becoming a more skillful learner, involving both our knowledge and regulation of our thinking processes. We define skillful learning to include intentional engagement in activities that deepen conceptual understanding and build connections. Such learning requires an individual sense of responsibility for learning, intellectual independence, and a sense of empowerment. Everyone is metacognitively active to one degree or another, but we all can benefit from improving our metacognitive skills. In this virtual workshop we will unpack specific elements of metacognition and operationalize metacognition in learning contexts. Interactive activities will be leveraged to recognize our own metacognitive activity and the metacognitive strengths and weaknesses in our students. This session will culminate with brainstorming and discussing ideas about where participants would like to apply metacognitive instruction with their students for possible development in the subsequent face-to-face workshops.

Online discusion with: 

Dr. Patrick Cunningham, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Dr. Holly M. Matusovich, Associate Professor of Engineering Education
Virginia Tech

Dr. Rachel McCord, Lecturer and Research Assistant Professor in the Engineering Fundamentals Program,
University of Tennessee

Note: You can attend online or in person in Teer 106. Lunch will be provided in Teer 106, or you can use Zoom to attend remotely. When you register, let us know how you plan to attend. 

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VFF: Sifting Data

Fri, 2019-12-06 17:00
LSRC D106
This summer, independent artist Heather Gordon completed a residency at the Rubenstein Center for the Arts with a project titled "Forest for the Trees". Please join us for Heather's discussion of how orphaned data from Duke Forest archives expanded her artistic practice and informs her creative output with a more outward looking stance. Over her career, Heather has used both personal and public data to construct origami folding patterns to show the shape of a specific narrative. Her presentation will trace the origins of her ideas about the ambiguities of number, the acquisition of meaning, and the fear of unperceived existence. Specifically, she will speak to how and why she creates geometric folding patterns using rule-based methods and a variety of data such as binary conversions, date and time intervals, and geographic locations to create visual information structures.
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VFF: Artistic Data Mining

Fri, 2019-12-06 17:00
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.
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Getting Specific about Critical Thinking

Thu, 2019-12-05 17:00
East Campus

Our guest will be Justin K. Rademaekers, who will join our conversation by webcam to discuss his recent WAC Journal article "Getting Specific about Critical Thinking: Implications for Writing Across the Curriculum." Rademaekers writes, "The development of students’ critical thinking abilities has long been an omnipresent concept in composition theory, in writing pedagogy, and, indeed, in many of our writing classrooms. Perhaps some readers have even listed critical thinking as a learning outcome on one of your course syllabi? As a writing across the curriculum (WAC) director and composition instructor at my own institution, I’ve found that the phrase “critical thinking” has a great deal of import across the curriculum, more so than other phrases I’ve tried to share with faculty teaching writing across the curriculum— phrases like genre awareness, knowledge transfer, or even . . . rhetoric. In fact—writing aside—faculty, staff, and administrators in higher education might be hard-pressed to find a concept more widely shared and agreed upon across the curriculum than the expectation that students should develop critical and analytical thinking skills during their pursuit of a higher education. Yet, despite the prominence of critical thinking in composition courses and higher education curricula, a widely shared and agreed upon definition of this term proves elusive, which complicates its import into WAC conversations." His article, which presents findings from an interview-based study of faculty across the academic spectrum, invites us to consider whether there is such a thing as generic, transferable thinking skills--or if our discipline-oriented writing courses can best address "critical thinking" as a discipline-specific practice. Participants are asked to read the article in advance and bring questions and related experiences to share. (Access the article here).  Friedl Bldg 216, East Campus. Please register here.

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Long Night Against Procrastination

Thu, 2019-12-05 00:00
Bostock Library
It's the most wonderful time of the year - finals season, of course! We know you can hardly stand the wait for those magical days ahead, but the Long Night Against Procrastination can help make extra sure we're all working at maximum productivity. Spend an evening getting on top of everything you have to do - or just come and de-stress with our soothing activities, door prizes, and free coffee and snacks! However you want to approach it, we're doing everything we can to make sure finals week is as simple and pain-free as possible. Staff from the TWP Writing Studio and Duke Libraries will be on hand for help with writing and research. Tutors from the Academic Resource Center will also be available. Help us make the event green by bringing your own coffee mugs and water bottles, and let us help you ace finals week! Refreshments provided by Saladelia, Duke University Campus Club, and Friends of the Duke University Libraries.
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BRITE Ideas Teaching and Research Series

Wed, 2019-12-04 17:00
Rubenstein Library 249 (Carpenter Conference Room)
West Campus

Learning Innovation and BRITE Lab invite you to join us for BRITE Ideas, a monthly discussion group to share and develop research on teaching and learning. Invited guest speakers include those who have either completed or are currently engaged in research projects about teaching and learning. Please join Christina Bejjani and Brenda Yang as they share research on "Insights across disciplines: What do Duke Students Believe About Intelligence?

 

All meetings are located in the Rubenstein Library, Room 249, from 12:00 – 1:00pm. Light refreshments will be provided – you are welcome to bring your lunch.

 

About BRITE Lab

The BRITE Lab at Duke University aims to improve higher education by applying the theories and methods of psychology: the scientific study of the mind and behavior. Our research draws insights from the study of human cognition, emotion, social interaction, and culture to understand college students’ experiences and develop better educational practices. We use the tools of science to find out whether and why different educational methods work.

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Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tue, 2019-12-03 18:30
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help. 

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Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom: MOOC Discussion

Tue, 2019-12-03 17:00
Bostock 039
West Campus

This informal brown-bag discussion will center on the learning experience in the free open online course "Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom," created by Cornell University Center for Teaching Innovation, and hosted on the edX platform from November 4 - December 9, 2019. This online course for higher education instructors focuses on how to create and sustain inclusive, student-centered learning environments.

Read more about the online course here, and register for the edX MOOC (for free) here.

Those who are taking the online course are welcome to gather Tuesdays 12-1 PM, to discuss the content and activities from the prior week of the course. Attending these discussions is optional, of course - you are free to participate in the MOOC without joining these in-person discussions. 

  • Tuesday 11/12 - discuss the November 4-11 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/19 - discuss the November 11-18 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/26 - discuss the November 18-25 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 12/3 - discuss the November 25-December 2 course activities and readings. 
  • Tuesday 12/10 - discuss the December 3-9 course activities and readings.

You're welcome to bring your own lunch and drink; we'll provide dessert. 

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Open Studio (ScholarWorks)

Tue, 2019-11-26 18:30
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Make an appointment or just drop-in during Open Studio hours, to consult with staff of ScholarWorks, A Center for Scholarly Publishing at Duke University Libraries. We can help you to

  • plan and create a digital publication
  • build adience engagement and impact
  • improve discovery and use
  • sustain a digital publication
  • integrate data publishing
  • and other aspects of expanding the potential for your scholarly work

Visit ScholarWorks.duke.edu for more examples of the kinds of questions we can answer as well as for resources you can use now. You can also contact scholarworks@duke.edu with your questions or ideas and we'll put you in contact with the appropriate person to help. 

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