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Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom: MOOC Discussion

Tue, 2019-11-26 17:00
Bostock 039
West Campus

This informal brown-bag discussion will center on the learning experience in the free open online course "Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom," created by Cornell University Center for Teaching Innovation, and hosted on the edX platform from November 4 - December 9, 2019. This online course for higher education instructors focuses on how to create and sustain inclusive, student-centered learning environments.

Read more about the online course here, and register for the edX MOOC (for free) here.

Those who are taking the online course are welcome to gather Tuesdays 12-1 PM, to discuss the content and activities from the prior week of the course. Attending these discussions is optional, of course - you are free to participate in the MOOC without joining these in-person discussions. 

  • Tuesday 11/12 - discuss the November 4-11 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/19 - discuss the November 11-18 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/26 - discuss the November 18-25 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 12/3 - discuss the November 25-December 2 course activities and readings. 
  • Tuesday 12/10 - discuss the December 3-9 course activities and readings.

You're welcome to bring your own lunch and drink; we'll provide dessert. 

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Spaces of Translation

Fri, 2019-11-22 19:00
Smith Warehouse - Bay 10, 2nd Floor
Arpeggio is an annual graduate-student organized interdisciplinary conference of AAHVS department. This year, with the overarching theme of "Spaces of Translation," Arpeggio invites scholars and students to explore the relationship between the original and reinterpreted, the authors and translators, and the artists and art historians from diverse regions such as China, France, Mexico, and the United States. Three speakers - Amara Solari (Penn State University Professor, Pre-Columbian and Colonial Latin American Art), Kristel Smentek (MIT Professor, Eighteenth-century European art and Asian-European Cultural Interaction), Dario Robleto (Contemporary artist based in Houston, TX interested in the intersection between art and science) - will give valuable talks and a panel discussion will follow. Arpeggio will take place at 2:00pm on Friday, November 22 in the Collision Space, Smith Warehouse, Bay 10, A266. The event begins at 2:00pm with Dr. Amara Solari's presentation of her paper "The Translatable Sacristy: Maya Blue and the Reception of Triune Theology in 16th C. Yucatan," followed at 2:55pm with Dr. Kristel Smentek's presentation of her paper "China in the Studio in 18th C. France," and concludes at 4:05pm with Dario Robleto's presentation of his paper "Small Crafts on Sisyphean Seas." A panel discussion will start at 5:00pm with a reception to immediately follow. Arpeggio is free and open to the public.
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"Spaces of Translation"

Fri, 2019-11-22 19:00
Smith Warehouse - Bay 10, 2nd Floor
Arpeggio is an annual graduate-student organized interdisciplinary conference of AAHVS department. This year, with the overarching theme of "Spaces of Translation," Arpeggio invites scholars and students to explore the relationship between the original and reinterpreted, the authors and translators, and the artists and art historians from diverse regions such as China, France, Mexico, and the United States. Three speakers - Amara Solari (Penn State University Professor, Pre-Columbian and Colonial Latin American Art), Kristel Smentek (MIT Professor, Eighteenth-century European art and Asian-European Cultural Interaction), Dario Robleto (Contemporary artist based in Houston, TX interested in the intersection between art and science) - will give valuable talks and a panel discussion will follow. Arpeggio will take place at 2:00pm on Friday, November 22 in the Collision Space, Smith Warehouse, Bay 10, A266. The event begins at 2:00pm with Dr. Amara Solari's presentation of her paper "The Translatable Sacristy: Maya Blue and the Reception of Triune Theology in 16th C. Yucatan," followed at 2:55pm with Dr. Kristel Smentek's presentation of her paper "China in the Studio in 18th C. France," and concludes at 4:05pm with Dario Robleto's presentation of his paper "Small Crafts on Sisyphean Seas." A panel discussion will start at 5:00pm with a reception to immediately follow. Arpeggio is free and open to the public.
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Table Top Role Playing Game Narrative Design

Thu, 2019-11-21 21:00
Other (see event description)
West Campus

This workshop will be in Link Classroom 6, Perkins Library. Participants are encouraged to stay after the workshop for open lab time.


Are you an avid RPG player? Would you like to build compelling story arcs for games like Dungeons and Dragons and Pathfinder? Join like-mind participants and work with an experienced Dungeon Master to get started.

This workshop is part of a series leading into the Global Game Jam (Jan. 31st-Feb.02, 2020, https://globalgamejam.org/2020/jam-sites/duke-university) The GGJ is the world's largest game jam where participants design, iterate, and share games in a whirlwind 48 hours. Registration opens in November so make sure you sign up for the Games and Culture email list for updates by emailing gamesandculture@duke.edu!

Co-sponsored by the Duke Game Lab, the Games and Culture Lab, and Learning Innovation. Please contact Katya Gorecki (kg134@duke.edu) with any questions about the workshop series or the GGJ.

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A Professor's Experience with Peer Evaluation

Thu, 2019-11-21 17:00
Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
West Campus

Professor Robert Duvall (Computer Science) will speak about his experiences organize peer evaluation of group work. As a part of their grades when working in teams, students are expected to rate their own participation in the group, as well as to provide feedback about how their colleagues contributed (or not) to the team. He will share the types of questions he asks students in order to extract meaningful feedback to be used as a basis for improving student team work, and about his attempts to bring some formality to peer grading through online programs and grading guidelines.

Lunch will be provided.

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Assessment and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Wed, 2019-11-20 17:00
Rubenstein Library 349 (Breedlove Conference Room)
West Campus

Hosted by Trinity College Office of Assessment

Assessment can and should contribute to the scholarship of teaching and learning! Join us for a lunchtime panel session on translating assessment into published scholarship. Topics will include preparing for informed consent and institutional review, accessing and using Trinity College data, and aligning your research methodologies with the assessment priorities of the program.  

Panelists:

  • Bridgette Hard, Associate Professor of the Practice, Psychology and Neuroscience,
  • Marcia Rego, Associate Professor of the Practice, Thompson Writing Program, and
  • Julie Reynolds, Associate Professor of the Practice, Biology. 

Alex Martinez, Associate Director of the Campus IRB, and Kim Manturuk, Associate Director of Research, Evaluation and Development in Duke Learning Innovation will be present to answer questions.  

Lunch will be provided.

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Create Augmented Reality Media with ThingLink

Tue, 2019-11-19 19:00
Bostock 039
West Campus

Duke faculty, students, and staff are invited to learn about the educational application ThingLink, a tool for creating augmented images and videos. ThingLink allows users to tag (standard or 360º) photos and videos with embedded text, videos, images, audio, plus links to more information. The product is a media-rich item that can be shared by URL, inserted into a website, or shared privately. Attend this session to learn how to use ThingLink and get set up with your free account. You are also welcome to attend virtually, simply indicate that preference in your RSVP.

Read more about the pilot.

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Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom: MOOC Discussion

Tue, 2019-11-19 17:00
Bostock 039
West Campus

This informal brown-bag discussion will center on the learning experience in the free open online course "Teaching & Learning in the Diverse Classroom," created by Cornell University Center for Teaching Innovation, and hosted on the edX platform from November 4 - December 9, 2019. This online course for higher education instructors focuses on how to create and sustain inclusive, student-centered learning environments.

Read more about the online course here, and register for the edX MOOC (for free) here.

Those who are taking the online course are welcome to gather Tuesdays 12-1 PM, to discuss the content and activities from the prior week of the course. Attending these discussions is optional, of course - you are free to participate in the MOOC without joining these in-person discussions. 

  • Tuesday 11/12 - discuss the November 4-11 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/19 - discuss the November 11-18 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 11/26 - discuss the November 18-25 course activities and readings.
  • Tuesday 12/3 - discuss the November 25-December 2 course activities and readings. 
  • Tuesday 12/10 - discuss the December 3-9 course activities and readings.

You're welcome to bring your own lunch and drink; we'll provide dessert. 

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Creating a Profession: The Education of American Surgeons, 1900-1960

Tue, 2019-11-19 17:00
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

Join us for our next Trent History of Medicine Lecture Series.

Justin Barr, M.D., Ph.D, will present "Creating a Profession:  The Education of American Surgeons, 1900-1960." 

Dr. Barr will discuss how the influence of war, the support of the federal government, and the drive of professional organizations led to the transformation of surgical education and residencies to help create a unified profession that continues to influence health care in this country.

 

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Creating a Profession: The Education of American Surgeons, 1900-1960

Tue, 2019-11-19 17:00
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
Dr. Barr will discuss how the influence of war, the support of the federal government, and the drive of professional organizations led to the transformation of surgical education and residencies to help create a unified profession that continues to influence health care in this country.
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Faculty Bookwatch | The Fixer: Visa Lottery Chronicles by Charles Piot

Tue, 2019-11-19 15:00
Smith Warehouse, Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall, Bay 4, C105
Please RSVP for event & lunch at https://fixer.eventbrite.com/ Please join the Franklin Humanities Institute and Duke University Libraries for a Faculty Bookwatch panel on The Fixer: Visa Lottery Chronicles (Duke University Press, 2019). In this book, Duke anthropologist Charles Piot follows Kodjo Nicolas Batema, a visa broker-known as a "fixer"-in the West African nation of Togo as he helps his clients apply for the U.S. Diversity Visa Lottery program. Through detailed and compelling stories, The Fixer illustrates the desire and savviness of migrants as they work to find what they hope will be a better life. Charles Piot is Professor of Cultural Anthropology and African & African American Studies at Duke. He is the Peter Lange Faculty Director of DukeEngage and also co-directs the Africa Initiative. Panelists include: Tsitsi Jaji, Duke University Hans Lucht, Danish Institute for International Studies Achille Mbembe, Wits Institute for Social & Economic Research Aïssatou Mbodj, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut des mondes africains Henrik Erdman Vigh, University of Copenhagen Lunch & book sale to follow. Faculty Bookwatch celebrates and promotes interdisciplinary conversations on major recent books by Duke humanities or interpretative social sciences faculty. Each Bookwatch program brings together a panel of distinguished colleagues giving brief comments on the significance and impact of the featured book.
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Working with Sources 

Mon, 2019-11-18 18:30
Other (see event description)
West Campus

Working with texts is a key element of nearly all scholarly writing, but especially so in the humanities and interpretive social sciences.  Students’ knowledge of practices such as source selection; employing summary, paraphrase, and quotation; and citation is often rudimentary and their attempts often lack rhetorical purpose. This session gives an overview of common challenges students face in working with sources and explores strategies for helping students approach sources effectively as writers. 

LSRC B102, West Campus. Please register here.

From the Thompson Writing Program’s Writing in the Disciplines program. For more information about this event, contact Cary Moskovitz.

 

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DVS Workshop: Research Data Management 201: Preparing Your Data for Publishing

Thu, 2019-11-14 18:30
Bostock Library - The Edge Workshop Room
First Floor
Data management practices help researchers take care of their data throughout the entire research process from the planning phase to the end of a project when data might be shared or "published" within a repository. Building upon the foundational concepts covered in the Data Management 101 courses offered this year, this workshop will provide hands-on experience where participants will learn strategies for "curating" a dataset for formal sharing. Participants will identify common data issues, determine recommendations to optimize the dataset, generate metadata and documentation, and consider how these practices might be applied to their own research. Participants are not required to have taken a Data Management 101 course (although it is recommended). Please bring a laptop to participate fully in the workshop.
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Reception & Artist's Talk with Renée Jacobs: Q&A Moderated by Tom Rankin

Wed, 2019-11-13 22:00
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
"Slow Burn: A Photodocument of Centralia, Pennsylvania" chronicles Centralia's demise from an underground coal mine fire and depicts a singular epic event in Pennsylvania history, representing the confluence of environmental, scientific, bureaucratic, and emotional tragedies. As an award winning photojournalist, Jacobs moved into a house in Centralia's impact zone in 1983 to document, in photographs and interviews, the end stages of the tiny anthracite coal town's unsuccessful fight to resolve the intractable problems that began with the mine fire in 1962 and culminated in the razing of the town by the federal government. The Archive of Doumentary Arts in the Rubenstein Library acquired Jacobs' Slow Burn project archive in 2016. The Slow Burn archive consist of more than 200 rolls of 35mm black and white film, the accompanying contact sheets, more than 1,000 silver gelatin work prints, contemporaneous news articles, oral history interviews and vintage exhibition prints. Additionally, the archives include maquettes for the original 1986 book and the 2010 re-issue, as well as prints with printer's notations. _______ The Q&A with the artist will be moderated by Tom Rankin. Introductions at 5:45 p.m.; artist's talk and Q&A at 6 p.m. The exhibit "Slow Burn: A Photodocument of Centralia, Pennsylvania, Photographs by Renée Jacobs" will be on view from November 2, 2019-February 16, 2020.
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Reception & Artist's Talk with Renée Jacobs

Wed, 2019-11-13 22:00
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
"Slow Burn: A Photodocument of Centralia, Pennsylvania" chronicles Centralia's demise from an underground coal mine fire and depicts a singular epic event in Pennsylvania history, representing the confluence of environmental, scientific, bureaucratic, and emotional tragedies. As an award winning photojournalist, Jacobs moved into a house in Centralia's impact zone in 1983 to document, in photographs and interviews, the end stages of the tiny anthracite coal town's unsuccessful fight to resolve the intractable problems that began with the mine fire in 1962 and culminated in the razing of the town by the federal government. The Archive of Doumentary Arts in the Rubenstein Library acquired Jacobs' Slow Burn project archive in 2016. The Slow Burn archive consist of more than 200 rolls of 35mm black and white film, the accompanying contact sheets, more than 1,000 silver gelatin work prints, contemporaneous news articles, oral history interviews and vintage exhibition prints. Additionally, the archives include maquettes for the original 1986 book and the 2010 re-issue, as well as prints with printer's notations. _______ The Q&A with the artist will be moderated by Tom Rankin. Introductions at 5:45 p.m.; artist's talk and Q&A at 6 p.m. The exhibit "Slow Burn: A Photodocument of Centralia, Pennsylvania, Photographs by Renée Jacobs" will be on view from November 2, 2019-February 16, 2020.
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DVS Workshop: Managing Sensitive Data

Tue, 2019-11-12 18:30
Bostock Library - The Edge Workshop Room
First Floor
In the course of your research you may collect, interact with or analyze data that are classified as "Sensitive" or "Restricted" according to Duke's data classification standard. In this workshop we will examine common sensitive data types, how Duke's IRB and Information Technology Security Office (ITSO) expects you to protect that data throughout your project's lifecycle and the resources available to you for sensitive data storage and analysis. We will also discuss data de-identification methods and resources, and where data with access restrictions can be archived to comply with data sharing mandates from funders and journal publishers.
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The Business of Books: An Insider's Look at 21st Century Publishing

Fri, 2019-11-08 17:00
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
Leaders of two top publishing houses - a trade press and an academic press - offer insights on navigating the world of book publishing now, and discuss where the industry is heading. Featuring Julia Reidhead, President of W.W. Norton & Company, and Dean Smith, Director of Duke University Press, in a conversation moderated by Ed Balleisen, Duke Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies. Light lunch provided. Free, but space is limited. To reserve a spot, please register by clicking on the link for more event information below.
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DVS Workshop: Intro to R: Data Transformations, Data Structures, and the Tidyverse

Thu, 2019-11-07 18:00
Bostock Library - The Edge Workshop Room
First Floor
A gentle introduction to R and the Tidyverse using RStudio. This two-hour, hands-on session introduces data wrangling, data types, variable assignments, and packages. Our focus will be the Tidyverse, specifically the dplyr and ggplot packages. Tidyverse, is an approachable set of consistent data science tools enabling the R statistical programming language.
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Ciompi Quartet Lunchtime Classics

Tue, 2019-11-05 17:00
Rubenstein Library Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room 153
In this free noontime event, the Ciompi Quartet will perform works by Füsun Koksal, Kurtág and Fauré. The Ciompi Quartet was founded at Duke University in 1965 by the renowned Italian violinist Giorgio Ciompi. All its members are professors at Duke and play a leading role in its cultural life, in addition to traveling widely throughout the year for performances. In a career that includes many hundreds of concerts and spans five continents, the Ciompi Quartet has developed a reputation for performances of real intelligence and musical sophistication, and for a warm, unified sound that is enhanced by each player's strong individual voice. This concert is presented in association with Duke University Libraries.
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VFF: Where are you, and how loud is it there? Visualizing and accounting for spatial uncertainty in behavioral response studies on whales.

Fri, 2019-11-01 16:00
LSRC D106
Since the mid-1990's a family of cryptic, deep-diving whales known as beaked whales has been stranding in close association with Naval activities that use sonar - a critical weapon in anti-submarine warfare. Beaked whales rely on their hearing for many critical life functions, and extremely loud sounds can have mortal consequences. What is less well known is how individual whales respond to lower levels of sonar, and what these consequences may mean. Currently Duke is co-leading a behavioral response study off Cape Hatteras to determine this dose-response relationship. Here I provide the history, discuss and display the different types of data that we collect and analyze. In particular I focus on the use of satellite tags, which allow researchers to study whales over longer time periods. I will show the methods we have employed to date, including how we visualize and propagate the positional uncertainty and determine the received level. Ultimately we hope our efforts contribute to a better understanding of how marine mammals respond to sound, and how to mitigate against future stranding events.
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