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Updated: 1 hour 49 min ago

Mellon's Monograph Initiative and the Reassembling of Scholarly Communications [Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship Discussion Group]

Mon, 2018-05-21 16:00
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Monographs, long the apex of scholarly accomplishment in the humanities, have faced a crisis in recent years -- from diminishing markets for publishing these scholarly works, to insufficient technologies for capturing and disseminating the range of digitally inflected scholarship emerging from the humanities. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's Scholarly Communications Initiative awarded several grants (2014-2015) to encourage innovation and capacity-building in scholarly monograph publishing. "Reassembling Scholarly Communications," a 2017 report on this endeavor published by members of the Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing in The Journal of Electronic Publishing (volume 20, issue 1), uses final reports from those sponsored projects, conversations with project grantees, and a critical examination of these alongside discourse of the Mellon Foundation, to raise questions and highlight assumptions that underlie this initiative and its results. As part of The Edge's 2017-2018 series, Re: Publishing, this M&M discussion will examine these assumptions and the report findings, consider the implications for humanities publishing, and pose questions for ourselves about how long-form scholarship can be rewarded and sustained. 

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Thomas More's _Dialogue of Comfort_ Gets Translated Yet Again [Munch & Mull Digital Scholarship Discussion Group]

Mon, 2018-05-14 16:00
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Mark DeLong (Director, Duke Research Computing) did some "digital humanities" back in 1986 with code developed using Borland's "TurboPascal" and data compiled by counting lines in an Everyman's Library Edition, derived from the 1557 edition of Thomas More's Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation. Following established digital humanities practices of the 1980s, DeLong misplaced both the Pascal code and the data he compiled. He did get a couple of pages in his dissertation out of the effort, which he now says was "not a good trade, given the amount of time the data compilation took."

Since 1986, More's work has been made available online (https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/17075), and Mark has learned Perl and some Python. In order to redeem himself from the horrors of bad data practices, he's returned to the project and hopes to deepen his now ancient scholarship on More's Dialogue of Comfort. At this Munch & Mull discussion, Mark will outline his current progress and opine about his transition from classic scholar to grey-haired, bow-tied digital hipster, perhaps shedding some light on a direction for (at least his) digital humanities work.

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