Upcoming British music performances at Duke

Humanities - Thu, 2017-11-02 15:46
Upcoming British music performances at DukeUpcoming British music performances at Duke

A weekend of British music begins this Friday, Nov. 3rd with a performance by The Villiers Quartet at 8pm in Baldwin Auditorium.

The Villiers Quartet is quickly establishing a reputation as champions of 20th-21st century British (and American) music. This concert in Duke’s Baldwin Auditorium, part of their 2017 North American tour, features a wonderful balance of the lushly romantic Delius (in its original 1916 version), the lyrical poise of American composer/violinist Andrew Waggoner’s recent score Every Sentient Being, and unusual British pieces from the 1920s (Bush’s Dialectic) and 1950s (Fricker’s Quartet No. 2).

The Villiers are currently Quartet-in-Residence at Oxford University. The Strad hailed them as among the most charismatic and “adventurous” players on the scene.  The Villiers Quartet has released several highly-acclaimed CDs on Naxos which are available from the Duke Music Library, most recently a recording of the Delius String Quartet (original and revised versions) and the Elgar String Quartet.

The public is invited to attend a pre-concert talk given by Daniel Grimley (Merton College, Oxford) at 7 pm in the Library Seminar Room, Biddle Music Building (adjacent to Baldwin Auditorium).

On Saturday, Nov. 4th at 5pm in the Nelson Music Room on Duke’s East Campus, British composer Frank Bridge’s Piano Trio No. 2 (1929), widely considered to be one of his greatest chamber works, will be featured in a concert by violinist Hsiao-mei Ku, Professor in the Duke Department of Music and member of the Ciompi Quartet; pianist R. Larry Todd, Arts and Sciences Professor of Music at Duke; and cellist David Meyer of the North Carolina Symphony.  Listen to a performance of this piece through the Duke Music Library subscription to the Naxos online streaming service.

These two concerts are part of the symposium, British Music & Europe in the Age of Brexit, presented by the Duke University Department of Music and Franklin Humanities Institute: Humanities Futures.

 

Problems in Digital Publishing: Data Portability [Digital Publishing Workshop]

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Thu, 2017-11-02 14:30
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Making information public with a piece of software is easy.  What's less straightforward is how to move that information from one platform to another without losing any of the affordances, metadata, or other attributes attached to it.  This session will provide an overview of some common data migration tasks and describe best practices for ensuring that your digital work stays portable and sustainable.  

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Problems in Digital Publishing: Data Portability [Digital Publishing Workshop]

Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Making information public with a piece of software is easy.  What's less straightforward is how to move that information from one platform to another without losing any of the affordances, metadata, or other attributes attached to it.  This session will provide an overview of some common data migration tasks and describe best practices for ensuring that your digital work stays portable and sustainable.  

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November Collections Spotlight: International Literary Prize Winners

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Wed, 2017-11-01 21:03

Check out our new display featuring books by celebrated international authors

November Collections Spotlight: International Literary Prize Winners

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Wed, 2017-11-01 21:03

Check out our new display featuring books by celebrated international authors

November 2017 Pop-up Collections Spotlight: International Literary Prize Winners

Humanities - Wed, 2017-11-01 20:17

This month’s pop-up collections spotlight falls on international literary prize winners.  The following books were selected by the staff of Duke University Libraries’ International and Area Studies Department.  These selections represent diverse genres (novel, drama, short story, poetry, memoir, oral history) and regions of the globe (Latin America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Middle East).  Taken together, the list below not only provides suggestions for entertaining reads, but also sheds light on one of the many ways that the Libraries’ collections and services align with the University priorities of “internationalization” and “interdisciplinarity.”

(click on book photos for links to books in our collection)

Winners of the Noble Prize in Literature

Gabriela Mistral (Chile, 1945)
“for her lyric poetry which, inspired by powerful emotions, has made her name a symbol of the idealistic aspirations of the entire Latin American world.”

 

 

 

Miguel Angel Asturias (Guatemala, 1967)
“for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America.”

 

 

 

Wisława Szymborska (Poland, 1996)
“for poetry that with ironic precision allows the historical and biological context to come to light in fragments of human reality.”

 

 

 

Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus, 2015)
“for her polyphonic writings, a monument to suffering and courage in our time.”

 

 

 

 

Gao Xingjian (China, 2000)

“for an æuvre of universal validity, bitter insights and linguistic ingenuity, which has opened new paths for the Chinese novel and drama.”

 

 

 

Mo Yan (China, 2012)
“who with hallucinatory realism merges folk tales, history and the contemporary.”

 

 

 

 

Wole Soyinka (Nigeria, 1986)
“who in a wide cultural perspective and with poetic overtones fashions the drama of existence.”

 

 

 

Dario Fo (Italy, 1997)
“who emulates the jesters of the Middle Ages in scourging authority and upholding the dignity of the downtrodden.”

 

 

 

Patrick Modiano (France, 2014)
“for the art of memory with which he has evoked the most ungraspable human destinies and uncovered the life-world of the occupation.”

 

 

 

Herta Müller (Germany, 2009)
“who, with the concentration of poetry and the frankness of prose, depicts the landscape of the dispossessed.”

 

 

 

Shmuel Yosef Agnon (Israel, 1966)

for his profoundly characteristic narrative art with motifs from the life of the Jewish people.”

 

 

 

Ōe Kenzaburō (Japan, 1994)
who with poetic force creates an imagined world, where life and myth condense to form a disconcerting picture of the human predicament today.”

 

 

 

Kawabata Yasunari (Japan, 1968)
for his narrative mastery, which with great sensibility expresses the essence of the Japanese mind.”

 

 

 

Orhan Pamuk (Turkey, 2006)
who in the quest for the melancholic soul of his native city has discovered new symbols for the clash and interlacing of cultures.”

 

 

 

Najīb Maḥfūẓ (Egypt, 1988)

who, through works rich in nuance – now clear-sightedly realistic, now evocatively ambiguous – has formed an Arabian narrative art that applies to all mankind.

 

 

Winners of the Man Booker Prize for Fiction

David Grossman (Israel, 2017)

whose “ambitious high-wire act of a novel…shines a spotlight on the effects of grief, without any hint of sentimentality.”

 

 

 

Salman Rushdie (UK, 1981)
whose novel about India’s political independence offers a “fascinating family saga and an astonishing evocation of a vast land and its people – a brilliant incarnation of the universal human comedy.”

 

 

Arundhati Roy (India, 1997)

whose novel not only “paints a vivid picture about life in a small rural Indian town…in magical and poetic language,” but also offers “a poignant lesson in the destructive power of the caste system and moral and political bigotry in general.”

 

Han Kang (South Korea, 2016)
whose “fraught, disturbing, and beautiful” novel is not only about “modern day South Korea, but also…shame, desire, and our faltering attempts to understand others, from one imprisoned body to another.”

 

 

Winner of the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction

UK prize awarded for best full-length novel written in English by a woman of any nationality

Lisa McInerney (Ireland, 2016)

whose “searing debut novel about life on the fringes of Ireland’s post-crash society…presents an unforgettable vision of a city plagued by poverty and exploitation, where salvation still awaits in the most unexpected places.”

 

 

Winner of the Dinaane Debut Fiction Award


South African literary prize awarded to writers who have never been published before. The word “dinaane” means “telling our stories together” in Setswana.

Kopano Matlwa (South Africa, 2006)

whose “audacious, lyrical and compassionate tale explores the grey, in-between, intimate experiences and dilemmas of a young girl who, like the society around her, is undergoing changes that call old boundaries, comforts and certitudes into question.”

 

 

Winner of the Commonwealth Book Prize for Asia

Literary prize awarded to writers who were Commonwealth citizens aged 18 or over and who have had their first novel published in the year of entry.

Nayomi Munaweera (Sri Lanka, 2013)

whose “sweeping saga” of the Sri Lankan civil war “offers an unparalleled portrait of a beautiful land during its most difficult moments.”

 

 

Blog post provided by Erik Zitser, Librarian for Slavic, Eurasian, and Eastern European Studies

The Future of Online Education at Duke

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2017-11-01 19:30
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

Fall 2017 marks the 5th anniversary of Duke University’s partnership with Coursera to offer online courses to learners around the world. To mark this anniversary, Online Duke and CIT are hosting a panel discussion about how online education is evolving at Duke: where we’ve been, what’s changed, and what we think is coming in the future. The panel will feature Duke instructors and administrators with experience teaching online courses and developing online programs to advance their educational missions. Matthew Rascoff, Duke’s Associate Vice Provost for Digital Education and Innovation, will moderate.

The panel will feature Duke instructors and administrators with experience teaching online courses and developing online programs to advance their educational missions. Panelists:

  • Leonard E. White, Associate Professor in Neurology and Coursera Instructor
  • Mine Cetinkaya-Rundel, Associate Professor of the Practice of Statistical Science and Coursera Instructor
  • Pedro Lasch, Associate Research Professor in the Department of Art, Art History and Visual Studies and Coursera Instructor
  • Michael E. Zychowicz, Associate Professor and Director, Master of Science in Nursing Program
  • Jennifer Chambers, Senior Director, Alumni Education, Duke Alumni Association
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The Future of Online Education at Duke

CIT Events Test - Wed, 2017-11-01 19:30
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

Fall 2017 marks the 5th anniversary of Duke University’s partnership with Coursera to offer online courses to learners around the world. To mark this anniversary, Online Duke and CIT are hosting a panel discussion about how online education is evolving at Duke: where we've been, what's changed, and what we think is coming in the future.

The panel will feature Duke instructors and administrators with experience teaching online courses and developing online programs to advance their educational missions.

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Currents of Change: Migration, Transit and Outcomes in the Mediterranean

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2017-11-01 16:00
Wed, Nov 01, 2017
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Join the Rubenstein Library's Human Rights Archive and the Forum for Scholars and Publics for a dialogue and critical examination of the history of recent immigration in the Mediterranean and its impact on individual, local, and global migration politics, policy, and culture. Our key guest will be Malta-based Darrin Zammit Lupi, an internationally respected and award-winning photojournalist and humanitarian who has been participating in and documenting sea migration in the Mediterranean region for over ten years. Zammit Lupi will be joined by Niels Frenzen, faculty at USC Gould School of Law and an advocate since the 1980s both for migrants crossing the Caribbean and the Mediterranean, and Holly Ackerman, Duke Librarian and scholar on sea migration.
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Currents of Change: Migration, Transit and Outcomes in the Mediterranean

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2017-11-01 16:00
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

Join the Human Rights Archive and the Forum for Scholars and Publics for a dialogue and critical examination of the history of recent immigration in the Mediterranean and its impact on individual, local, and global migration politics, policy, and culture.

Our key guest will be Malta-based Darrin Zammit Lupi, an internationally respected and award-winning photojournalist and humanitarian who has been participating in and documenting sea migration in the Mediterranean region for over ten years.

Zammit Lupi will be joined by Niels Frenzen, faculty at USC Gould School of Law and an advocate since the 1980s both for migrants crossing the Caribbean and the Mediterranean, and Holly Ackerman, Duke Librarian and scholar on sea migration.

 

Co-sponsored by the Forum for Scholars and Publics, Duke Human Rights Center @ FHI, and the Kenan Institute for Ethics Refugee Project.

 

More about the Darrin Zammit Lupi:

www.darrinzammitlupi.com

 

For more information, contact:

Patrick Stawski, Human Rights Archivist

 

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Open Studio

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Wed, 2017-11-01 15:00
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Drop-in consultations and team work time for digital projects. To reserve a specific appointment time with a Digital Scholarship Services staff member, contact askdigital@duke.edu.

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Open Studio

Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Drop-in consultations and team work time for digital projects. To reserve a specific appointment time with a Digital Scholarship Services staff member, contact askdigital@duke.edu.

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Learning Innovation Open Office Hours

CIT Events Test - Wed, 2017-11-01 14:00
Bostock 024
West Campus

Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? Consultants from Learning Innovation (formerly, The Center for Instructional Technology) are available to discuss course design, best practices in pedagogy and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED.

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CIT Open Office Hours

CIT Events Test - Wed, 2017-11-01 14:00
Bostock 024
West Campus

Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED.

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Accessing and understanding information in your Tableau program informational reports

CIT Events Test - Wed, 2017-11-01 13:00
East Campus

The Trinity Office of Assessment is offering this workshop, to be held in 1001 Bevan Building, 1121 West Main Street, Durham, NC 27701 (parking passes provided). 

Duplicate session also offered Thursday, October 26. Additional sessions will be offered in spring 2018.

  • Participants will be able to access interactive reports containing information about undergraduate student learning in their programs. 
  • Participants will understand the general types of data available and how they may be used to supplement ongoing evaluations of student learning.
  • Data include measures of ethical reasoning, global perspectives, critical thinking, reflective judgment, and starting in 2015 quantitative reasoning and literacy.
  • The dashboards also include information about the composition of your student population, any relevant pre-matriculation inputs (e.g., SAT scores), co-incidental majors and minors, outcomes at graduation, and other attributes. 

Questions about this session should be directed to Jennifer Hill, jlh9@duke.edu.

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East Campus CIT Office Hours

CIT Events Test - Tue, 2017-10-31 18:00
Lilly Library Computer Lab
East Campus

Want to change your syllabus? Need help creating an online discussion board? CIT consultants are available to discuss course design and instructional technology.  Come by to ask questions about active learning in class or how to think about teaching a new course. We can also answer questions about using Sakai, WordPress, and other Duke supported instructional technologies for teaching and learning. REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED.

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It's Coming: Screamfest V at the Rubenstein Library

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Tue, 2017-10-31 17:30
Tue, Oct 31, 2017
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM
It's coming, the event so monstrous we're too scared to have it more than once a year... Screamfest.This Halloween, join the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as we dive into the creepiest, the spookiest, the most coulrophobia-inducing (look it up) collections we have to offer, including: amputation saws perfect for cannibal clowns; paranormal tools for communicating with your missing siblings; and other materials destined to haunt your deepest slumbers.Free open to the public. Come for the free candy, stay for more free candy.But remember, whatever you do, don't take one of the red balloons.
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It's Coming: Screamfest V at the Rubenstein Library

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Tue, 2017-10-31 17:30
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

It’s coming, the event so monstrous we’re too scared to have it more than once a year … Screamfest.

This Halloween, join the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as we dive into the creepiest, the spookiest, the most coulrophobia-inducing collections we have to offer, including: amputation saws perfect for cannibal clowns; paranormal tools for communicating with your missing siblings; and other materials destined to haunt your deepest slumbers.

Free open to the public. Come for the free candy, stay for more free candy.

But remember, whatever you do, don’t take one of the red balloons.

 

Read more:

Screamfest IV: Stranger Things at the Rubenstein (2016)

Screamfest III: The Cutening (2015)

Screamfest II: Prepare for Terror (2013)

Haunted Library Screamfest (2011)

 

For more info, contact:

Liz Adams, Special Collections Cataloger

Sierra Moore, Research Services Library Assistant 

 

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Open Studio

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Tue, 2017-10-31 17:00
Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Drop-in consultations and team work time for digital projects. To reserve a specific appointment time with a Digital Scholarship Services staff member, contact askdigital@duke.edu. 

event image

Open Studio

Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
West Campus

Drop-in consultations and team work time for digital projects. To reserve a specific appointment time with a Digital Scholarship Services staff member, contact askdigital@duke.edu. 

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