DivE-In Encourages You to Take 5

Bogs Featured for Marine (wordpress) - Tue, 2021-05-04 11:27

Recommended activities, programs, and educational opportunities on diversity, equity, and inclusion issues

The post DivE-In Encourages You to Take 5 appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

How to Make Library Spaces Intentional, Inclusive, Flexible

Blogs Featured Posts (wordpress) - Mon, 2021-05-03 06:00

One of the biggest and trickiest areas to get right is the design of our physical library spaces

The post How to Make Library Spaces Intentional, Inclusive, Flexible appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

How to Make Library Spaces Intentional, Inclusive, Flexible

Bogs Featured for Marine (wordpress) - Mon, 2021-05-03 06:00

One of the biggest and trickiest areas to get right is the design of our physical library spaces

The post How to Make Library Spaces Intentional, Inclusive, Flexible appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Lilly Collection Spotlight: Films to Help Fortify and Fight Back

Blogs Featured Posts (wordpress) - Thu, 2021-04-29 06:00

In recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, we’re highlighting films that illuminate this urgent issue

The post Lilly Collection Spotlight: Films to Help Fortify and Fight Back appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Lilly Collection Spotlight: Films to Help Fortify and Fight Back

Bogs Featured for Marine (wordpress) - Thu, 2021-04-29 06:00

In recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, we’re highlighting films that illuminate this urgent issue

The post Lilly Collection Spotlight: Films to Help Fortify and Fight Back appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

5 Titles: Southern African American Outsider Artists

Blogs Featured Posts (wordpress) - Wed, 2021-04-28 06:00

A new series highlighting library resources related to diversity, equity, and inclusion

The post 5 Titles: Southern African American Outsider Artists appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

5 Titles: Southern African American Outsider Artists

Bogs Featured for Marine (wordpress) - Wed, 2021-04-28 06:00

A new series highlighting library resources related to diversity, equity, and inclusion

The post 5 Titles: Southern African American Outsider Artists appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Maps of Early 20th-Century Durham

Blogs Featured Posts (wordpress) - Tue, 2021-04-27 09:18

A volume of Sanborn fire insurance maps recently came through our conservation lab

The post Maps of Early 20th-Century Durham appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Maps of Early 20th-Century Durham

Bogs Featured for Marine (wordpress) - Tue, 2021-04-27 09:18

A volume of Sanborn fire insurance maps recently came through our conservation lab

The post Maps of Early 20th-Century Durham appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

What to Read this Month

Blogs Featured Posts (wordpress) - Tue, 2021-04-27 09:13

Recommended reads from our New & Noteworthy and Contemporary Literature Collections

The post What to Read this Month appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

What to Read this Month

Bogs Featured for Marine (wordpress) - Tue, 2021-04-27 09:13

Recommended reads from our New & Noteworthy and Contemporary Literature Collections

The post What to Read this Month appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

What to Read This Month: April 2021

Humanities (wordpress) - Mon, 2021-04-26 13:08

Congrats on making it through another unusual semester here at Duke! We at the library realize that you’re probably busy with end-of-semester projects and finals (and remember, we’re always here to help!), but if by chance you’ve got the time to pick up a new book to read, here are some great selections from our Overdrive and New & Noteworthy collections. As always, these picks represent just a tiny fraction of what’s available, so be sure to follow the above links to see what else we have!

 BooksYour House Will Pay by Steph Cha. In this thriller, Cha tells the story of Grace and Shawn, two Angelenos whose lives unexpectedly intersect when Grace’s mother is injured in a drive-by shooting. It is the summer of 2019, and as tensions in the city come to a head following the police shooting of an unarmed Black teenager, Grace is shocked to learn an egregious family secret: in 1991, a member of Grace’s family murdered a teenage girl named Ava, believing her to be stealing from the family’s convenience store, and received no jail time for the crime. The event ignited tensions between Los Angeles’ Black and Korean communities, and in 2019, the investigation surrounding the shooting of Grace’s mother resurrects some of these tensions at the family level. It also exacts a heavy toll on Shawn, Ava’s brother, who has been haunted by sister’s death for 28 years. As he becomes involved in the investigation, he must confront his own grief as well as the very family responsible for Ava’s murder. Cha derives much of the story from the real-life 1991 murder of Latasha Harlins, and in so doing, offers a tense exploration of race, grief, and justice. You can read a review here and an interview with Cha here.

 BooksTroubled: The Failed Promise of America’s Behavioral Treatment Programs by Kenneth R. Rosen. In this book, journalist Rosen traces the fraught history of American behavioral treatment programs, most of which have historically taken the form of spartan residential camps and schools. The book is partially a memoir, as Rosen describes at length his own experience with such programs: as a teenager with behavioral issues in the mid-2000s, Rosen was sent against his will to three separate institutions throughout the United States, all of which treated him brutally while also having little positive effect on him; despite (or perhaps because of) his years in these programs, his young adulthood proved to be a dysfunctional and often unstable one. Rosen also interviews a number of other graduates from similar institutions, and their testimonies strongly bolster Rosen’s argument that the American industry of behavioral treatment programs is one built not only on precarious conclusions about mental health and behavioral therapy, but also on abject cruelty to children. The book is undoubtedly a heavy read, but nonetheless an important one. You can read a review here and listen to an interview with Rosen here.

  BooksKlara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro. In this novel, Nobel Prize winner Ishiguro explores issues ranging from the myriad difficulties of adolescence to questions surrounding the nature of emotional artificial intelligence. At an unspecified future date, Klara exists an “Artificial Friend,” essentially a robot designed to serve as an empathizing and socializing companion, in an era where technology has upended many facets of everyday human life. She lives in a department store, spending her days making human—and somewhat superhuman—observations about the world around her, until one day she is purchased for a sickly teenage girl named Josie. Josie is the result of “lifting”—genetic editing, which in this universe has become rather commonplace for wealthy people—and is intelligent beyond her years. This has come at a personal cost; normal schools have proven inadequate for her, and her homeschooling has caused her socialization to lag behind. Worse, the side effects of the editing have rendered her ill and will possibly even kill her. Klara fills a serious void for Josie, and as the two develop their relationship, Ishiguro explores heavy themes of love, intelligence, and loneliness. You can read reviews here and here.

  BooksOf Women and Salt by Gabriela Garcia. In this novel, Garcia tells the collective and intergenerational tale of two families living in contemporary Miami. There are two pairs of mothers and daughters that anchor the story: Jeannette and her mother Carmen, and Ana and her mother Gloria. Carmen and Jeannette’s relationship is marked by tumult, with their political and cultural disagreements (Jeannette was raised in Miami and comes to question the perspectives of her mother, a wealthy Cuban immigrant) exacerbated by Jeannette’s struggles with addiction. The two live in close proximity to Ana and Gloria, both of whom are undocumented immigrants from El Salvador. After Gloria is detained by ICE, Jeannette briefly takes Ana in, and things come to a head when Carmen fatefully convinces Jeannette to call the police over the situation. In the midst of these current events, Garcia also focuses on Jeannette’s relationship with her family in Cuba, exploring both her interactions with her living family members as well as her understanding of the family’s past generations. In all, Garcia poetically portrays issues of identity and family in a heated political atmosphere. You can read reviews here and here.

 BooksThe Black Church: This Is our Story, This Is Our Song by Henry Louis Gates Jr. In this book, which serves as a companion piece to a recently-aired PBS documentary series of the same name, renowned historian Gates offers a near-exhaustive history of the Black church in the United States, as well as its significance and profound influence on American culture at large. Beginning with the subject of praise houses, churches used by enslaved people in the South, Gates explicates the manifold spiritual and theological roots of the modern-day Black church, and relays the evolution of its many denominations. He makes the compelling case that the Black church has proven to be a highly elastic institution, adapting to the varying needs and plights of Black Americans throughout history, while at once serving as a powerful shaper of Black culture and political movements. Ending his account in the modern era, he brings in the voices of a number of scholars, and these contributions only further enrich his telling of this complicated and often controversial history. You can read a review here and learn more about the accompanying PBS documentary here.

The post What to Read This Month: April 2021 appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Library study space design: Intentional, inclusive, flexible

Bitstreams (wordpress) - Fri, 2021-04-23 16:45

descriptive imageIn the Assessment & User Experience department, one of our ongoing tasks is to gather and review patron feedback in order to identify problems and suggest improvements. While the libraries offer a wide variety of services to our patrons, one of the biggest and trickiest areas to get right is the design of our physical … Continue reading Library study space design: Intentional, inclusive, flexible

The post Library study space design: Intentional, inclusive, flexible appeared first on Bitstreams: The Digital Collections Blog.

WORLD BOOK AND EARTH DAY SPECIAL. OUR COMMON GROUND. Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia.

All Libcal Events (huginn) - Wed, 2021-04-21 22:00
None
Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia. Live conversation with authors. Jie Lu, Martín Camps, and Miguel Rojas-Sotelo. Moderated by professor Zairong Xiang. JIE LU. THE UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC. Co-Editor: Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia (2020) Professor Lu works on issues of representation of the city and new urban culture in contemporary Chinese fiction and film. She is a professor of Chinese Studies & Film Studies at the University of the Pacific. MARTIN CAMPS. THE UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC. Co-Editor: Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia (2020) Professor of Spanish and Director of Latin American Studies. MIGUEL ROJAS SOTELO. DUKE UNIVERSITY. Featured author Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia (2020).
event image

WORLD BOOK AND EARTH DAY SPECIAL. OUR COMMON GROUND. Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia.

Events - All Combined (huginn) - Wed, 2021-04-21 22:00
Wed, Apr 21, 2021
10:00 PM - 11:30 PM
Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia. Live conversation with authors. Jie Lu, Martín Camps, and Miguel Rojas-Sotelo. Moderated by professor Zairong Xiang. JIE LU. THE UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC. Co-Editor: Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia (2020) Professor Lu works on issues of representation of the city and new urban culture in contemporary Chinese fiction and film. She is a professor of Chinese Studies & Film Studies at the University of the Pacific. MARTIN CAMPS. THE UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC. Co-Editor: Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia (2020) Professor of Spanish and Director of Latin American Studies. MIGUEL ROJAS SOTELO. DUKE UNIVERSITY. Featured author Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia (2020).
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WORLD BOOK AND EARTH DAY SPECIAL. OUR COMMON GROUND. Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia.

All Libcal Events (huginn) - Wed, 2021-04-21 21:00
Virtual
Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia. Live conversation with authors. Jie Lu, Martín Camps, and Miguel Rojas-Sotelo. Moderated by professor Zairong Xiang. JIE LU. THE UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC. Co-Editor: Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia (2020) Professor Lu works on issues of representation of the city and new urban culture in contemporary Chinese fiction and film. She is a professor of Chinese Studies & Film Studies at the University of the Pacific. MARTIN CAMPS. THE UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC. Co-Editor: Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia (2020) Professor of Spanish and Director of Latin American Studies. MIGUEL ROJAS SOTELO. DUKE UNIVERSITY. Featured author Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia (2020).
event image

WORLD BOOK AND EARTH DAY SPECIAL. OUR COMMON GROUND. Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia.

Events - All Combined (huginn) - Wed, 2021-04-21 21:00
Wed, Apr 21, 2021
9:00 PM - 10:30 PM
Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia. Live conversation with authors. Jie Lu, Martín Camps, and Miguel Rojas-Sotelo. Moderated by professor Zairong Xiang. JIE LU. THE UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC. Co-Editor: Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia (2020) Professor Lu works on issues of representation of the city and new urban culture in contemporary Chinese fiction and film. She is a professor of Chinese Studies & Film Studies at the University of the Pacific. MARTIN CAMPS. THE UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC. Co-Editor: Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia (2020) Professor of Spanish and Director of Latin American Studies. MIGUEL ROJAS SOTELO. DUKE UNIVERSITY. Featured author Transpacific Literary and Cultural Connections: Latin American Influence in Asia (2020).
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National Poetry Month 2021

Humanities (wordpress) - Mon, 2021-04-19 14:04

This year is the 25th National Poetry Month. The Academy of American Poets has 30 ways to celebrate on their website.

This year I want to honor Lawrence Ferlinghetti who died this year at the age of 101. You can read a nice bio and overview of his work at the Poetry Foundation. We of course also have many of his works in our library:

Little Boy

Ferlinghetti’s Greatest Poems

How to Paint Sunlight: Lyric Poems & Others (1997-2000)

These are My Rivers: New & Selected Poems, 1955-1993

Starting from San Francisco

He was also the founder of City Lights, a bookstore and a publisher in San Francisco. This 2013 blog post “A Literary Meeting Place: The History Behind City Lights Bookstore” is a good place to start to understand the legacy of City Lights. Here is a selection of titles that they have published:

City Lights Pocket Poets Anthology

City Lights Anthology

Every Day We Get More Illegal by Juan Felipe Herrera

Funeral Diva by Pamela Sneed

Collected Poems of Bob Kaufman

Heaven is All Goodbyes by Tongo Eisen-Martin

And Then We Became by Devorah Major

Save Twilight selected poems of Julio Cortázar ; translated by Stephen Kessler

The post National Poetry Month 2021 appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Duke Libraries Preservation Week 2021 Events

Preservation Underground (wordpress) - Mon, 2021-04-19 11:35
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We are participating in two events for Preservation Week 2021. There is so much happening this year. Make sure you follow #preswk to find other events across the country.

FFV1: The Gains of Lossless (Duke University Libraries)

Monday, April 26, 2021, 2-3 pm Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Registration: https://duke.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0sde2pqDwtE9zuOPITn7TZm2SSpxeNBc-1

One of the greatest challenges to digitizing moving-image sources such as videotape and film reels is the enormous file sizes that result, and the high costs associated with storing and maintaining those files for long-term preservation. To help offset this challenge, Duke University Libraries has recently implemented the FFV1 video codec as its primary format for moving image preservation.

FFV1 enables lossless compression of moving image content, and produces a file that is, on average, 1/3 the size of its uncompressed counterpart. Alex Marsh, Digitization Specialist—Video and Craig Braeden, Audiovisual Archivist will give a brief overview of FFV1, and their experience utilizing it to digitize the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library’s moving-image assets.

Careers in Preservation: A Panel Discussion (University of Illinois)

Thursday, April 29, 1:00-2:00pm Central

Registration: https://illinois.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_a1XaZHI1St6E7DKHgQsY0Q

Join five preservation professionals as they discuss their education and career paths. The final half of the session will be reserved for questions from the audience.

Panelists:

  • Jacob Nadal, Director for Preservation, Library of Congress
  • Miriam Centeno, Preservation and Digitization Strategist, The Ohio State University Libraries
  • Henry Hébert, Conservator for Special Collections, Duke University Libraries
  • Daniel Johnson, Digital Preservation Librarian, University of Iowa Libraries
  • Sarah Mainville, Media Preservation Librarian, Michigan State University Libraries

The post Duke Libraries Preservation Week 2021 Events appeared first on Preservation Underground.

Maps of Durham

Preservation Underground (wordpress) - Fri, 2021-04-16 15:43
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Another very exciting and very large book arrived in the lab this week: a volume of the Sanborn fire insurance maps for the city of Durham.

The Sanborn maps were used as a reference by insurance underwriters to assess risk and determine how much insurance to offer without having to physically travel to the location. Originally published in 1913, the contents of this book were continually updated until 1931 to accurately reflect changes in buildings throughout the city. Rather than reprint the maps annually with updates, corrections were just pasted in. You can see the evidence of these corrections everywhere. For example, the endsheets are covered in additional indexes:

Looking closely, you can see printed instructions to the corrector for which indexes to paste over with the update. Small cutouts of updated maps are also pasted, layer after layer, throughout the interior.
The binding is reflective of common ledger bindings from the late 19th and early 20th century, which feature a number of structural components designed to allow such a large and heavy book to function. These include both leather and heavy cloth spine linings, a shaped rigid spine piece, and cloth reinforced hinges.
Despite the added strength from those materials, they have not been able to withstand the stresses that this book places on them when opening – particularly as they have aged and weakened. Large portions of leather and the “hubs” (raised bands) are missing from the spine. The leather joints have completely split and the spine piece is just hanging on by a thread now. Fortunately the sewing and spine linings remain intact and functional.

Luckily, most of the stamped leather tabs remain.

While examining the book, I was keeping an eye out for some of Durham’s more notable landmarks.  The Erwin Cotton Mill, located at the corner of 9th and Main street, was easy to spot.

I also found the oldest operating business on 9th street, the White Star Laundry. That corner looks a little different these days. The building in yellow was demolished in the 1950s.

When I came across the Liberty Warehouse, it looked like it was in the wrong place.  But the building that I have always known as the Liberty Warehouse (now the site of an apartment building by the same name) was actually the third iteration of the warehouse, built in 1940.

I even found the infamous “Canopener” bridge on Gregson St!

The Sanborn maps contain a wealth of information about the cities they describe and are an important resource for scholarship. We will be working with the curators at the Rubenstein Library to determine the best treatment plan for stabilizing and housing this volume so that it can be safely accessed by patrons.

If you are interested in learning more about the history of your city from Sanborn maps, you might be able to find digital images of the maps through the Library of Congress.

The post Maps of Durham appeared first on Preservation Underground.