12 Duke-Authored Books on Women’s History

Bogs Featured for Marine (wordpress) - Tue, 2021-03-09 08:49

Duke scholars document women’s contributions to history, culture and society

The post 12 Duke-Authored Books on Women’s History appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Our Latest Newsletter Is Out!

Blogs Featured Posts (wordpress) - Fri, 2021-03-05 11:08

Subscribe and be the first the know about library events, services, and other news you can use

The post Our Latest Newsletter Is Out! appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Our Latest Newsletter Is Out!

Bogs Featured for Marine (wordpress) - Fri, 2021-03-05 11:08

Subscribe and be the first the know about library events, services, and other news you can use

The post Our Latest Newsletter Is Out! appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Quick Pic: Work–Life Balance

Preservation Underground (wordpress) - Fri, 2021-03-05 10:44

Have you ever encountered a book cover design that just perfectly captures a mood? After a full week of Zoom meetings, a winter of seemingly endless rain, and a year of pandemic, this new guest in the lab really taps into that Friday feeling.

Aono Suekichi’s 1930 Sarariiman no Kyôfu Jidai (The Salaryman’s Panic Times or, as Google translates it, The Office Worker’s Age of Horror) is an analysis of Japan’s salaryman class, placing it in context of a capitalist society, and attempting to explain “how and why they were fated to a life of continual unhappiness and psychological depression caused by the growing disparity between their consumerist aspirations and their incapacity to satisfy them” (Harootunian 2000). Cover design by Masamu Yanase.

If you find yourself identifying a little too much with this cover, just follow the advice of Freddie Mercury: Don’t lose your head. It’s Friday and spring is right around the corner!

Harootunian, Harry. Overcome by Modernity: History, Culture, and Community in Interwar Japan. PRINCETON; OXFORD: Princeton University Press, 2000. Accessed March 5, 2021. doi:10.2307/j.ctt7s326.

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CDVS Workshop: R case study: web scraping

Events - All Combined (huginn) - Thu, 2021-03-04 13:30
Thu, Mar 04, 2021
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Bulding on knowledge from earlier Rfun workshops, useRs will be introduced to web crawling and HTML parsing. In this introductory web scraping workshop, attendees will use the rvest package to deconstruct a target site into structured data by combining limited knowledge of HTML specifications with a very limited appreciation of the HTTP protocol along with basic Tidyverse-style iteration.

CDVS Workshop: R case study: web scraping

All Libcal Events (huginn) - Thu, 2021-03-04 13:30
Online
Bulding on knowledge from earlier Rfun workshops, useRs will be introduced to web crawling and HTML parsing. In this introductory web scraping workshop, attendees will use the rvest package to deconstruct a target site into structured data by combining limited knowledge of HTML specifications with a very limited appreciation of the HTTP protocol along with basic Tidyverse-style iteration.
event image

R case study: web scraping

All Libcal Events (huginn) - Thu, 2021-03-04 13:30
n/a

Building on knowledge from earlier Rfun workshops, useRs will be introduced to web crawling and HTML parsing.  In this introductory web scraping workshop, attendees will use the rvest package to deconstruct a target site into structured data by combining limited knowledge of HTML specifications with a very limited appreciation of the HTTP protocol along with basic Tidyverse-style iteration. 

Prerequisites

  • Introductory familiarity with R and the Tidyverse (e.g. quickStart with R, part 1)
  • Install R and RStudio on your computer
  • tidyverese and rvest packages installed in your R environment

install.packages(c("tidyverse", "rvest"))

This event is offered virtually in accordance with Duke's Coronavirus events policies. A zoom link will be sent via email to registered participants to join the workshop. 

The content of the workshop may be recorded. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published, please contact the instructor at anytime prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

Data Science

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$1,500 Prize for Book Collecting

Blogs Featured Posts (wordpress) - Thu, 2021-03-04 11:53

Attention, student bibliophiles! Share your collection with us and you could win big money.

The post $1,500 Prize for Book Collecting appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

$1,500 Prize for Book Collecting

Bogs Featured for Marine (wordpress) - Thu, 2021-03-04 11:53

Attention, student bibliophiles! Share your collection with us and you could win big money.

The post $1,500 Prize for Book Collecting appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

CDVS Workshop: Ethics of Data Management and Sharing

Events - All Combined (huginn) - Wed, 2021-03-03 13:00
Wed, Mar 03, 2021
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
This workshop will explore the many different ethical issues that can arise with data management and sharing and strategies to address those issues to ensure that goals set by publishers and funders around reproducibility and reuse can be met. How are researchers expected to comply with data sharing policies and practices when they do not actually own the data or ensure disclosure protection for human participants? Likewise how can researchers ethically collect, handle, and share data from certain communities, such as Indeginous People? Topics covered will include proper consent procedures, de-identification, the impact of privacy laws on data sharing, and the application of diversity and equity principles to open science and data sharing.

CDVS Workshop: Ethics of Data Management and Sharing

All Libcal Events (huginn) - Wed, 2021-03-03 13:00
Online
This workshop will explore the many different ethical issues that can arise with data management and sharing and strategies to address those issues to ensure that goals set by publishers and funders around reproducibility and reuse can be met. How are researchers expected to comply with data sharing policies and practices when they do not actually own the data or ensure disclosure protection for human participants? Likewise how can researchers ethically collect, handle, and share data from certain communities, such as Indeginous People? Topics covered will include proper consent procedures, de-identification, the impact of privacy laws on data sharing, and the application of diversity and equity principles to open science and data sharing.
event image

Ethics of Data Management and Sharing

All Libcal Events (huginn) - Wed, 2021-03-03 13:00
n/a

This workshop will explore the many different ethical issues that can arise with data management and sharing and strategies to address those issues to ensure that goals set by publishers and funders around reproducibility and reuse can be met. How are researchers expected to comply with data sharing policies and practices when they do not actually own the data or ensure disclosure protection for human participants? Likewise how can researchers ethically collect, handle, and share data from certain communities, such as Indeginous People? Topics covered will include proper consent procedures, de-identification, the impact of privacy laws on data sharing, and the application of diversity and equity principles to open science and data sharing.

This workshop (GS717.04) is eligible for 2 hours of Graduate School RCR Credits and the 200-level RCR for faculty and staff.

This event is offered virtually in accordance with Duke's Coronavirus events policies. A zoom link will be sent via email to registered participants to join the workshop.

The content of the workshop may be recorded. If you are uncomfortable with a recording being published, please contact the instructor at any time prior to the conclusion of the workshop.

Data Management

event image

A Few Words in Memory of Our Friend, Sam

Blogs Featured Posts (wordpress) - Wed, 2021-03-03 06:00

Library staff and retirees share their memories of a longtime colleague and Duke personality

The post A Few Words in Memory of Our Friend, Sam appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

A Few Words in Memory of Our Friend, Sam

Bogs Featured for Marine (wordpress) - Wed, 2021-03-03 06:00

Library staff and retirees share their memories of a longtime colleague and Duke personality

The post A Few Words in Memory of Our Friend, Sam appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Summer Research Grants Deadline Extended: March 15

Blogs Featured Posts (wordpress) - Tue, 2021-03-02 09:57

Apply now for funds to help you do original library research over the summer

The post Summer Research Grants Deadline Extended: March 15 appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Summer Research Grants Deadline Extended: March 15

Bogs Featured for Marine (wordpress) - Tue, 2021-03-02 09:57

Apply now for funds to help you do original library research over the summer

The post Summer Research Grants Deadline Extended: March 15 appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Collecting for Global Diversity

Blogs Featured Posts (wordpress) - Tue, 2021-03-02 09:55

A new series exploring the role of international collections and their collectors in promoting equity, diversity, and inclusion

The post Collecting for Global Diversity appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Collecting for Global Diversity

Bogs Featured for Marine (wordpress) - Tue, 2021-03-02 09:55

A new series exploring the role of international collections and their collectors in promoting equity, diversity, and inclusion

The post Collecting for Global Diversity appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

What’s In The Lab: A Farewell to a Beloved Colleague

Preservation Underground (wordpress) - Fri, 2021-02-26 16:43
descriptive imageSam Hammond, University Carillonneur, played the Duke Chapel carillon at the close of each work day.Sam Hammond, University Carillonneur. Image from Duke Today.

Duke Libraries lost a beloved colleague yesterday. Sam Hammond passed away Thursday at the age of 73. Sam was many things. He worked in the library for 41 years including as a music librarian, and as a librarian in the Rubenstein Rare Books and Manuscripts Library.  Sam was also a campus carillonneur for over 50 years. He started playing the carillon as a first year Duke student in 1964. He retired from that job in 2018.  He also walked to work, and used those walks to pick up litter from the roadside. With every step he made the world just a little bit better.

Sam was a kind soul who always had time to help you when you needed information. When I would visit his office to review something, he would share some of the other wondrous things he was working on. I learned a lot from him. Sam had a sharp wit, and when he told a joke his eyes would shine. He was a true gentleman. But above all, he would routinely tell me how much he appreciated Conservation’s work, and that he was happy I was here at Duke . That always made me feel good, and it was a master class in how to treat your colleagues.

To honor Sam and his contributions to campus, Carillonneur Joey Fala played a variety of Sam’s favorites yesterday at 5pm. You can see the full recital online at Duke Today. Recordings of Sam playing the carillon, and more information on his life can be found online here and here.

As I was contemplating this blog post, I looked for items in the lab that would resonate. Flowers are often given to the family after they lose a loved one. This wonderful book on flowers is on our repair shelf. Tulips have many meanings, love, loyalty, peace and forgiveness. Plus, spring is just around the corner, and after the year we have had, who doesn’t need some cheerful spring blooms?

Garden Flowers in Color, by Daniel J. Foley (1943).

Thank you Sam. You have left your mark on Duke in ways too numerous to count. We will miss you immensely.

I folded a paper crane and left it on the front door of the Chapel before the concert. I hope its spirit found its way to Sam.

The post What’s In The Lab: A Farewell to a Beloved Colleague appeared first on Preservation Underground.

What to Read this Month: February 2021

Humanities (wordpress) - Fri, 2021-02-26 16:33

Hello again! I don’t know about you, but for me, February went by in a flash and I can’t believe we’re now inexplicably near the mid-point of the semester! If you’re looking for something new to read in this last little slice of February, look no further. Or actually, do look further: as always, our New & Noteworthy collection and our Overdrive collection are adding new titles all the time. I also recommend checking out our new 5 Titles series, which highlights the works of underrepresented authors and titles related to diversity, equity, and inclusion in our collection. This month’s post, featuring memoirs by African-American men, was written by RIS head Kim Duckett, and last month’s inaugural post, featuring nonfiction on neurodiversity, was authored by yours truly. Now, on to the books!

 BooksWandering in Strange Lands: A Daughter of the Great Migration Reclaims Her Roots by Morgan Jerkins. In this memoir, essayist Jerkins documents her tracing of her family’s heritage, a journey involving several locales in the United States, the investigation of multiple missing pieces in her family line, and the contributions of various historians and archivists. Along the way, Jerkins grapples with the many complexities of African-American identity, placing her personal family history in the larger context of Black American history. Some particular facets of this history that Jerkins touches upon in her investigation include the Great Migration, the development and preservation of Gullah culture, the fraught history of tribal citizenship for Black indigenous Americans, and the experiences of free people of color in Louisiana. In so doing, Jerkins also thoroughly interrogates the culture of white supremacy underpinning each piece of her family’s history, both past and present. Ultimately, her deeply personal investigation also serves as a compelling illustration of African-American history and culture. You can read reviews here and here.

 BooksThe New Wilderness by Diane Cook. In this novel, shortlisted for last year’s Booker Prize, Cook tells the story of Bea and Agnes, a mother and daughter living a harsh life of hunting and gathering in a rough wilderness left frighteningly unbalanced by climate change. Three years prior to the story’s events, Bea and Agnes, along with Bea’s husband Glen, had been living in a deeply polluted metropolis referred to only as “the City,” but Agnes’ respiratory problems drove the family to participate in a study on human-nature interactions that moved them to a place known as the Wilderness State, understood to be the last wild region left in the world. There, they live with the study’s other participants, roaming the land and learning survival skills lest they perish. Though the group is subject to the demands of the study’s “rangers,” tensions begin to flare between them, driving many of the novel’s core events. In the midst of all this, Cook focuses on the mother-daughter relationship between Bea and Agnes, exploring how it changes as Agnes regains her health and develops a strong attachment to the wilderness. You can read reviews here and here.

 A Counter-History | WileyTrans America: A Counter-History by Barry Reay. In this book, historian Reay seeks to correct the sidelining of transgender history in the US by providing readers with a thorough, compelling, and far-reaching account of the way transgender identity has developed over the centuries. His inclusive approach identifies several periods in this history, beginning with a broader survey of gender flexibility in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Following this discussion is an examination of the rise of transgender visibility in the 1960s and 70s, including the degree of persecution that accompanied it, and the more recent history of transgender people in the US leading up to the present. Reay populates his account with rich depictions of several transgender historical figures, many of whom have been hitherto ignored by the mainstream historical record. There is also a great deal of discussion devoted to the particular history of transgender culture within the Black and Latinx communities, as well as an exhaustive account of the history of medicalization (the book resists the medical model in its approach). You can read interviews with Reay here and here.

 BooksSelf Care by Leigh Stein. In this novel, novelist Stein offers ripping satire of corporate, Girlboss-style feminism in her portrayal of Richual, the fictional online women’s wellness company created by her fiercely ambitious, yet ultimately nihilistic protagonists Maren and Devin. The two hatch a plan to market a sanitized, monetized combination of social justice and self-care to their audience of primarily white, thin, middle-class women, and all goes well until a string of scandals forces the two to come to grips with exactly what it is that they have created. As Maren faces backlash for a misguided tweet, the duo also finds itself woefully unprepared to deal with a board member accused of sexual misconduct, one who happens to be involved with Devin and is largely responsible for the company’s funding. Amidst all this, Stein also focuses on Khadijah, a pregnant employee of the company who finds herself in the peculiar predicament of being afraid to ask for maternity leave from her nominally feminist bosses. In all, the novel, in its own darkly funny way, serves as a sharp criticism of white, lean-in feminism, one that’s difficult to look away from. You can read a review here and a Q&A with Stein here.

 Kindle StoreJust as I Am by Cicely Tyson with Michelle Burford. In this memoir, iconic actress Cicely Tyson tells the story of her life and her decades-long career. She first recounts early her life pre-show business, including a difficult account of the domestic abuse she witnessed as a child and her first marriage and divorce as a young woman, before describing her discovery as a model in the early 1950s at the age of thirty. From here, Tyson describes her experiences working in film and television as a Black woman in the mid- to late-twentieth century, offering a personal perspective on some of her most well-known projects, including Sounder and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman. She is unflinching in her descriptions of the difficulties she has faced, both in her professional and personal life, offering a full account of her long and often difficult relationship with Miles Davis. With Burford, she also reflects on the legacy of her career, her influences, and her many accolades. In this way, the memoir serves as a satisfying, full account of Tyson’s life, as well as something of an epilogue—Tyson died just days after its release last month. You can read reviews here and here.

The post What to Read this Month: February 2021 appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.