Technology and Our ethical Future - Lightening Talks hosted by Ethical Tech

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Tue, 2019-04-02 16:00
Rubenstein Library 153 (Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room)
West Campus

The Future of Ethical Tech, Justin Sherman, Co-Founder and Vice President, Ethical Tech

Liberatory Learning: Ethics, Technology, and Co-Creation, Aria Chernik, Education Strategist, Ethical Tech, Lecturing Fellow - Social Science Research Institute

Maybe the Earth is Flat? Why Data Helps Lies and Fake News, Bob Sullivan, Cybercrime & Consumer Tech Advisor, Ethical Tech

Ethics of Legal Tech: Text-driven Normativity to Data-driven Normativity, Emine Yildirim, Research Assistant, Ethical Tech

Technology and Education in the Developing World, Ken Rogerson, Policy Strategist, Ethical Tech, Professor of the Practice - Sanford School of Public Policy

Q & A and Panel Discussion

Lunch Served

RESERVE YOUR SPOT! Sign up here

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The Commons Approach

Bitstreams - Tue, 2019-04-02 12:00

Earlier this month, I was invited to give some remarks on “The Commons Approach” at the LYRASIS Leaders Forum, which was held at the Duke Gardens.  We have a great privilege and opportunity as part of the Duke University Libraries to participate in many different communities and projects, and it is one of the many … Continue reading The Commons Approach

The post The Commons Approach appeared first on Bitstreams: The Digital Collections Blog.

Spring Books by Duke Authors

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Tue, 2019-04-02 05:00

Adventures in artificial intelligence, Peruvian guerrillas, snow leopards, and more

The post Spring Books by Duke Authors appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Spring Books by Duke Authors

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Tue, 2019-04-02 05:00

Adventures in artificial intelligence, Peruvian guerrillas, snow leopards, and more

The post Spring Books by Duke Authors appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

My Duke Library: Tyler Chery’s Perspective

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Tue, 2019-04-02 01:00

How has the library impacted YOUR Duke experience?

The post My Duke Library: Tyler Chery’s Perspective appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

My Duke Library: Tyler Chery’s Perspective

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Tue, 2019-04-02 01:00

How has the library impacted YOUR Duke experience?

The post My Duke Library: Tyler Chery’s Perspective appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Radio Activism and the Politics of Grassroots Change

Rubenstein Technical Services - Mon, 2019-04-01 16:49
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Post contributed by Jennifer Garcon, Bollinger Fellow in Public and Community Data Curation at Penn Libraries

One morning in July 1965, an unfamiliar voice radiated from the transistor radios of Port-au-Prince residents. Rather than hearing pre-recordings of President-for-Life, François Duvalier, residents heard the dissenting voices of exiles based in New York. The program, La Voix de l’Union Haïtienne Internationale, would become known as Radio Vonvon.  While they must have immediately recognized the dangers of tuning in, people unearthed radios hidden in kitchens and in bathrooms, and continued to listen to the clandestine program each Sunday, “to listen to words of hope about one day ending this nightmare, in the words of New York-based Haitian journalist Ricot Dupuy. This, I argue, was a political act.

My doctoral research explores how journalists deployed various media strategies to mobilize their audiences against dictatorship in Haiti. I centralize broadcasting because, I argue, 1) radio was, and in many places, remains a powerful cultural force; 2) the medium was easily accessible and widely available, and thus had unparalleled democratic appeal and influence; and 3) radio, unlike print media, does not require literacy as a prerequisite for participation. Radio, particularly Kreyòl language broadcasting, was a platform that embodies equity and democratized politics; and vernacular radio archives reflect this inclusion.

From a material culture standpoint, reduced cost and increased post-WWII supply transformed radio technology into a crucial instrument of struggle in Cold War Latin America, and elsewhere in the Global South. As historian Alejandra Bronfman reminds us in Isles of Noise: Sonic Media in the Caribbean, “the sounds of radio are [by their very nature of production and dissemination] ephemeral.” For that reason alone, the comprehensiveness of the Radio Haiti Records are indeed exceptional.

Using a sampling of the approximately 5300 recordings and 191 boxes of paper documents that constitute the Radio Haiti archives —  spanning  field reports, editorials, investigative reports, in-studio interviews, and special programming —  I built an argument that reframes the everyday activities of ordinary people as political activity and agitation.

Investigating radio listening as a form of political engagement allows for a more granular examination of the transformation of civil society that I argue occurred between 1971 and 1987, during the presidency of Jean-Claude Duvalier and in the immediate aftermath of his fall from power. This, I contend, challenges the scholarly interpretations that mischaracterize peasants as politically inert throughout much of the Duvalier era, until the killing of three schoolboys in Gonaïves on November 28, 1985 (the Twa Flè Lespwa, or Three Flowers of Hope). In contrast, my research charts broad domestic ferment on the air-waves. Radio media, in addition to independent vernacular print outlets, offered a space where dispersed sectors of the Haitian population could critique and challenge state power. Radio records have helped to offer insights into patterns of open opposition to government excess that predate the 1985 killings. These included reactions to the murder of the young journalist Gasner Raymond, who was killed after investigating workers’ strikes at the state-owned cement factory in 1976;  rice farmers’ revolts against repressive local Macoutes in the Artibonite between 1977 and 1979; peasant farmers’ and workers’ opposition to Reynolds Haitian Mines in Miragoâne; attempted coups in 1981 and 1982, and anti-government bombings between 1980 and 1983.

Radio programming offered a discursive public space in which to practice one’s politics, where few other avenues remained. Having grown used to practicing forbidden forms of citizenship on the airwaves, this radio activism soon moved onto the streets. In the popular movement that uprooted Duvalierism, the Haitian majority– Kreyòl speaking peasant farmers, agricultural day laborers, and urban workers—who had once formed bases of support for the regime now demanded the end of the dictatorship. I plot the emergence of a nearly decade and a half long grassroots political movement against Jean-Claude Duvalier by examining radio media to show  how ordinary people first negotiated the terms of their citizenship within an authoritarian system, and later struggled to uproot that system in its entirety.

The complete audio archive of Radio Haiti will soon be available to the public via Duke’s Digital Repository, which will be an unparalleled resource for historians and other researchers interested in radio, political resistance, and the circulation of information in Haiti and in the Haitian diaspora.

The post Radio Activism and the Politics of Grassroots Change appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Refugee Access to Higher Education through Digital Innovation

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Mon, 2019-04-01 16:00
Other (see event description)
West Campus

Event will take place in 011 Old Chem. 

Forum for Scholars and Publics.

Kiron enables access to higher education and successful learning for refugees through digital solutions. 

 

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Introducing a New Library Space: The ZZZone

Blogs Featured Posts (non-pipes) - Mon, 2019-04-01 09:00

Our new collaboration with Duke Wellness is a dream come true

The post Introducing a New Library Space: The ZZZone appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Introducing a New Library Space: The ZZZone

Bogs Featured (for Marine) - Mon, 2019-04-01 09:00

Our new collaboration with Duke Wellness is a dream come true

The post Introducing a New Library Space: The ZZZone appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

Estimating Natural Mortality of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna Using Acoustic Telemetry

Scopus Query (for science portal) - Sat, 2019-03-30 22:42
Author(s):Block, B.A. | Whitlock, R. | Schallert, R.J. | Wilson, S. | Stokesbury, M.J.W. | Castleton, M. | Boustany, A.<br>Publication year: 2019<br>Journal / Book title: Scientific Reports<br><br>Access <a href="https://www.scopus.com/results/results.url?sort=plf-f&src=s&nlo=1&nlr=20&nls=&affilName=duke&sid=50C4CC75DD91BE54EF957326B03AC936.WeLimyRvBMk2ky9SFKc8Q%3a330&sot=afnl&sdt=cl&cluster=scopubyr%2c%222016%22%2ct%2c%222015%22%2ct%2bscosubtype%2c%22ar%22%2ct%2c%22ip%22%2ct%2c%22re%22%2ct%2c%22ch%22%2ct%2bscosubjabbr%2c%22ARTS%22%2cf%2c%22ECON%22%2cf%2c%22BUSI%22%2cf&sl=207&s=%28AF-ID%28%22Duke+University%22+60008724%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22P.M.+Gross+Chemical+Laboratory%22+60019814%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+University+Marine+Laboratory%22+60020096%29+OR+AF-ID%28%22Duke+Institute+for+Genome+Sciences+%26+Policy%22+60076653%29%29&origin=rssreader">all results</a> for your search in Scopus<br>

Head, Rubenstein Library Technical Services

Jobs Combined Feed From Huginn - Fri, 2019-03-29 20:21
<div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>The Head of the Rubenstein Library Technical Services Department provides vision and leadership in developing technical services that will support the innovative and interdisciplinary scholarly activities of the Duke community, both in Durham and on the global campuses. They lead and coordinate units that arrange, describe, catalog, and preserve materials in all formats in an environment of changing standards, tools, and scholarly practices. They manage the department’s budget and participate in development activities.</p></div></div></div>

Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2019-03-29 19:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)
West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

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Exhibit Tours: Five Hundred Years of Women's Work

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2019-03-29 18:00
Rubenstein Library Mary Duke Biddle Room
Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection." Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. (Exceptions: tours not offered April 12 and May 10.) Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite in the Rubenstein Library and will last about 30 minutes. Please let us know if you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility.
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Exhibit Tours: Five Hundred Years of Women's Work

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2019-03-29 18:00
Fri, Mar 29, 2019
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection." Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. (Exceptions: tours not offered April 12 and May 10.) Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite in the Rubenstein Library and will last about 30 minutes. Please let us know if you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility.

Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2019-03-29 18:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)
West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

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What to Read this Month: March 2019

Humanities - Fri, 2019-03-29 16:11

This month’s selections are books by and about some amazing women in honor of Women’s History Month. For more exciting reads, check out our Overdrive, New and Noteworthy, and Current Literature collections.

Bonus recommendation: Everything Happens for a Reason: And Other Lies I’ve Loved by Kate Bowler, also available as an audiobook on Overdrive.

The Wind In My Hair: My Fight for Freedom in Modern Iran by Masih Alinejad with Kambiz Foroohar.

An extraordinary memoir from an Iranian journalist in exile about leaving her country, challenging tradition, and sparking an online movement against compulsory hijab.

A photo on Masih’s Facebook page: a woman standing proudly, face bare, hair blowing in the wind. Her crime: removing her veil, or hijab, which is compulsory for women in Iran. This is the self-portrait that sparked ‘My Stealthy Freedom,’ a social media campaign that went viral.

But Masih is so much more than the arresting face that sparked a campaign inspiring women to find their voices. She’s also a world-class journalist whose personal story, told in her unforgettably bold and spirited voice, is emotional and inspiring. She grew up in a traditional village where her mother, a tailor and respected figure in the community, was the exception to the rule in a culture where women reside in their husbands’ shadows. As a teenager, Masih was arrested for political activism and was surprised to discover she was pregnant while in police custody. When she was released, she married quickly and followed her young husband to Tehran where she was later served divorce papers to the shame and embarrassment of her religiously conservative family. Masih spent nine years struggling to regain custody of her beloved only son and was forced into exile, leaving her homeland and her heritage. Following Donald Trump’s notorious immigration ban, Masih found herself separated from her child, who lives abroad, once again.

A testament to a spirit that remains unbroken, and an enlightening, intimate invitation into a world we don’t know nearly enough about, The Wind In My Hair is the extraordinary memoir of a woman who overcame enormous adversity to fight for what she believes in, and to encourage others to do the same.

You can watch Masih Alinejad explain My Stealthy Freedom at the 2016 Women in the World Summit in New York City. To follow My Stealthy Freedom in action, see their Facebook and Twitter.

Jefferson’s Daughters: Three Sisters, White and Black, in a Young America by Catherine Kerrison.

The remarkable untold story of Thomas Jefferson’s three daughters – two white and free, one black and enslaved – and the divergent paths they forged in a newly independent America.

Thomas Jefferson had three daughters: Martha and Maria by his wife, Martha Wayles Jefferson, and Harriet by his slave Sally Hemings. In Jefferson’s Daughters, Catherine Kerrison, a scholar of early American and women’s history, recounts the remarkable journey of these three women – and how their struggle to define themselves reflects both the possibilities and the limitations that resulted from the American Revolution.

Although the three women shared a father, the similarities end there. Martha and Maria received a fine convent school education while they lived with their father during his diplomatic posting in Paris – a hothouse of intellectual ferment whose celebrated salonnières are vividly brought to life in Kerrison’s narrative. Once they returned home, however, the sisters found their options limited by the laws and customs of early America.

Harriet Hemings followed a different path. She escaped slavery – apparently with the assistance of Jefferson himself. Leaving Monticello behind, she boarded a coach and set off for a decidedly uncertain future.

For this groundbreaking triple biography, Kerrison has uncovered never-before-published documents written by the Jefferson sisters when they were in their teens, as well as letters written by members of the Jefferson and Hemings families. She has interviewed Hemings family descendants (and, with their cooperation, initiated DNA testing) and searched for descendants of Harriet Hemings.

The eventful lives of Thomas Jefferson’s daughters provide a unique vantage point from which to examine the complicated patrimony of the American Revolution itself. The richly interwoven story of these three strong women and their fight to shape their own destinies sheds new light on the ongoing movement toward human rights in America – and on the personal and political legacy of one of our most controversial Founding Fathers.

Catherine Kerrison discussed Jefferson’s Daughters in a Conversations at the Washington Library podcast. also wrote Claiming the Pen: Women and Intellectual Life in the Early American South.

Song In a Weary Throat: Memoir of an American Pilgrimage by Pauli Murray, with a new introduction by Patricia Bell-Scott.

First published posthumously in 1987, Pauli Murray’s Song in a Weary Throat was critically lauded, winning the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award and the Lillian Smith Book Award among other distinctions. Yet Murray’s name and extraordinary influence receded from view in the intervening years; now they are once again entering the public discourse. At last, with the republication of this “beautifully crafted” memoir, Song in a Weary Throat takes its rightful place among the great civil rights autobiographies of the twentieth century.

In a voice that is energetic, wry, and direct, Murray tells of a childhood dramatically altered by the sudden loss of her spirited, hard-working parents. Orphaned at age four, she was sent from Baltimore to segregated Durham, North Carolina, to live with her unflappable Aunt Pauline, who, while strict, was liberal-minded in accepting the tomboy Pauli as “my little boy-girl.” In fact, throughout her life, Murray would struggle with feelings of sexual “in-betweenness” – she tried unsuccessfully to get her doctors to give her testosterone – that today we would recognize as a transgendered identity.

We then follow Murray north at the age of seventeen to New York City’s Hunter College, to her embrace of Gandhi’s Satyagraha – nonviolent resistance – and south again, where she experienced Jim Crow firsthand. An early Freedom Rider, she was arrested in 1940, fifteen years before Rosa Parks’ disobedience, for sitting in the whites-only section of a Virginia bus. Murray’s activism led to relationships with Thurgood Marshall and Eleanor Roosevelt – who respectfully referred to Murray as a “firebrand” – and propelled her to a Howard University law degree and a lifelong fight against “Jane Crow” sexism. We also read Betty Friedan’s enthusiastic response to Murray’s call for an NAACP for Women – the origins of NOW. Murray sets these thrilling high-water marks against the backdrop of uncertain finances, chronic fatigue, and tragic losses both private and public, as Patricia Bell-Scott’s engaging introduction brings to life.

Now, more than thirty years after her death in 1985, Murray – poet, memoirist, lawyer, activist, and Episcopal priest – gains long-deserved recognition through a rediscovered memoir that serves as a “powerful witness” (Brittney Cooper) to a pivotal era in the American twentieth century.

Pauli Murray is featured in multiple murals in Durham. To learn more about Pauli Murray and community projects commemorating her, check out the Pauli Murray Project.

Gertrude Weil: Jewish Progressive in the New South by Leonard Rogoff.

It is so obvious that to treat people equally is the right thing to do,” wrote Gertrude Weil (1879-1971). In the first-ever biography of Weil, Leonard Rogoff tells the story of a modest southern Jewish woman who, while famously private, fought publicly and passionately for the progressive causes of her age. Born to a prominent family in Goldsboro, North Carolina, Weil never married and there remained ensconced – in many ways a proper southern lady – for nearly a century. From her hometown, she fought for women’s suffrage, founded her state’s League of Women Voters, pushed for labor reform and social welfare, and advocated for world peace.

Weil made national headlines during an election in 1922 when, casting her vote, she spotted and ripped up a stack of illegally marked ballots. She campaigned against lynching, convened a biracial council in her home, and in her eighties desegregated a swimming pool by diving in headfirst. Rogoff also highlights Weil’s place in the broader Jewish American experience. Whether attempting to promote the causes of southern Jewry, save her European family members from the Holocaust, or support the creation of a Jewish state, Weil fought for systemic change, all the while insisting that she had not done much beyond the ordinary duty of any citizen.

A decade before Rogoff’s book, Anne Firor Scott wrote an article about Gertrude Weil. She relates a conversation about international problems where Gertrude exclaimed, “I grow more radical every year. Who knows? I may live long enough to become a communist!”

Gertrude Weil is featured in the Women of Valor exhibit in the Jewish Women’s Archive. She also has a highway marker in Goldsboro.

Always Another Country: A Memoir of Exile and Home by Sisonke Msimang.

Born in exile, in Zambia, to a guerrilla father and a working mother, Sisonke Msimang is constantly on the move. Her parents, talented and highly educated, travel from Zambia to Kenya and Canada and beyond with their young family. Always the outsider, and against a backdrop of racism and xenophobia, Sisonke develops her keenly perceptive view of the world. In this sparkling account of a young girl’s path to womanhood, Sisonke interweaves her personal story with her political awakening in America and Africa, her euphoria at returning to the new South Africa, and her disillusionment with the new elites. Confidential and reflective, Always Another Country is a search for belonging and identity: a warm and intimate story that will move many readers.

Sisonke Msimang gave a TEDTalk in 2017 titled If a Story Moves You, Act on It. She recently published The Resurrection of Winnie Mandela, which she discusses here.

 

The post What to Read this Month: March 2019 appeared first on Duke University Libraries Blogs.

The History of Visualization through the Rubenstein Library's Special Collections

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2019-03-29 16:00
LSRC D106
In 1821, William Playfair critiqued Adam Smith's conclusions in The Wealth of Nations. He argued that, despite Smith's genius, his conclusions would have been much different had he used data visualizations. In my class, "Theories and Practices of Data Visualization," my students and I study data visualizations through history in order to understand how the data visualization methods that we now employ daily have developed over time. Of primary concern is how visualization technologies and techniques made data increasingly accessible to larger audiences, and became instrumental in broadcasting information, and, even in some cases, saving lives. In visiting the collections of Duke's Rubenstein Library, students examine and interact with historical visualizations in their original context. In this talk I will discuss the highlights of this collection and the consequences of studying the history of data visualization on the development of present-day visualization practices.
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The History of Visualization through the Rubenstein Library's Special Collections

Events - All Combined (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2019-03-29 16:00
Fri, Mar 29, 2019
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
In 1821, William Playfair critiqued Adam Smith's conclusions in The Wealth of Nations. He argued that, despite Smith's genius, his conclusions would have been much different had he used data visualizations. In my class, "Theories and Practices of Data Visualization," my students and I study data visualizations through history in order to understand how the data visualization methods that we now employ daily have developed over time. Of primary concern is how visualization technologies and techniques made data increasingly accessible to larger audiences, and became instrumental in broadcasting information, and, even in some cases, saving lives. In visiting the collections of Duke's Rubenstein Library, students examine and interact with historical visualizations in their original context. In this talk I will discuss the highlights of this collection and the consequences of studying the history of data visualization on the development of present-day visualization practices.
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Visualization Friday Forum

All Libcal Events (Huginn Feed) - Fri, 2019-03-29 16:00
LSRC D106
The Visualization Friday Forum seminar series is a forum for faculty, staff and students from across the university (and beyond Duke) to share their research involving the development and/or application of visualization methodologies. Our goal is to build an interdisciplinary community of visualization experts whose combined knowledge can facilitate research and promote innovation. Anyone is welcome to attend.
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