Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

Rubenstein Library Events - Fri, 06/14/2019 - 19:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

Rubenstein Library Events - Fri, 06/14/2019 - 18:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

Rubenstein Library Events - Fri, 06/07/2019 - 19:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

Rubenstein Library Events - Fri, 06/07/2019 - 18:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

Rubenstein Library Events - Fri, 05/31/2019 - 19:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

Rubenstein Library Events - Fri, 05/31/2019 - 18:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

Rubenstein Library Events - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 19:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

Rubenstein Library Events - Fri, 05/24/2019 - 18:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

New Discoveries in the Robert A. Hill Collection: Rev. Claudius Henry and The International Peacemakers

Baskin Test - Tue, 05/21/2019 - 14:00

Post contributed by Meggan Cashwell, Technical Service Intern

I recently processed the latest accession to the Robert A. Hill Collection: The Jamaica Series. The series consists primarily of Professor Hill’s research on the Rastafari Movement and Rev. Claudius Henry. While evaluating the materials I came across several particularly fascinating items, including the “Rev. Henry Picture Album.” As I carefully examined each image, the history of Rev. Henry and his followers unfolded.

Emperor Haile Selassie

Professor Hill shared his extensive knowledge of Rev. Henry in an interview for Reggae Vibes. He was wrapping up a research trip in Jamaica in 2010 when he decided to spend part of the remainder of his time meeting with members of Rev. Henry’s International Peacemakers Association at Green Bottom, Clarendon. The elders welcomed him to “Bethel,” a facility Henry and the Peacemakers constructed decades earlier, and they shared about their relationship to the movement.

Rev. Henry (1903-1986) considered himself a prophet after experiencing a vision at age eighteen. He began preaching, eventually moving to Cuba and then America before returning to Jamaica in the 1950s to fulfill his revelation. Rev. Henry accumulated thousands of followers, and in 1959 built The African Reform Church of God in Christ. Professor Hill claims that Rev. Henry’s following constituted the largest Back-to-Africa Movement of its time. Rev. Henry traveled to Ethiopia more than once to meet with officials affiliated with Emperor Haile Selassie, considered by many Rastafarians to be the messiah (image one). Their ambitions to relocate were never realized. In 1960 Rev. Henry and fifteen others were arrested on grounds that they were plotting an insurrection against the Jamaican government. At their trial in 1960, which Professor Hill attended when he was 16, they were found guilty.

 

Peacemakers making baking bread

In 1966 Rev. Henry was released from prison and went back to his followers in the parish of Clarendon. There in Green Bottom, Rev. Henry and others built a commune called the International Peacemakers Association. The Peacemakers were self-sustaining. The pictures displayed in the album show the Peacemakers making tiles, gardening, farming, ranching, baking bread, and performing a host of other duties (images two and three). There was also a school, baptismal house, community center, and worship facility, among other structures (image four).

The picture album is a part of a separate subseries which also contains loose and mounted photographs, correspondence, receipts pertaining to the construction of the commune, programs, posters, and other materials. Collectively, they offer a rich history to researchers, and encourage scholars to ask new questions about the Rev. Henry, the Peacemakers, and their legacy.

Sources:

“Rev. Henry Picture Album,” Robert A. Hill Collection, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

“Rev. Claudius V. Henry and the Radicalization of the Rastafari Movement in Jamaica, 1957-1960,” Interview with Professor Robert A. Hill by Boris Lutanie, Reggae Vibes, Paris, France.

Alexus Bazen, “Ethnography of the International Peacemakers Association,” https://www.curf.upenn.edu/content/bazen-alexus-ethnography-international-peacemakers-association.

The post New Discoveries in the Robert A. Hill Collection: Rev. Claudius Henry and The International Peacemakers appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

New Discoveries in the Robert A. Hill Collection: Rev. Claudius Henry and The International Peacemakers

Devil's Tale Posts - Tue, 05/21/2019 - 14:00

Post contributed by Meggan Cashwell, Technical Service Intern

I recently processed the latest accession to the Robert A. Hill Collection: The Jamaica Series. The series consists primarily of Professor Hill’s research on the Rastafari Movement and Rev. Claudius Henry. While evaluating the materials I came across several particularly fascinating items, including the “Rev. Henry Picture Album.” As I carefully examined each image, the history of Rev. Henry and his followers unfolded.

Emperor Haile Selassie

Professor Hill shared his extensive knowledge of Rev. Henry in an interview for Reggae Vibes. He was wrapping up a research trip in Jamaica in 2010 when he decided to spend part of the remainder of his time meeting with members of Rev. Henry’s International Peacemakers Association at Green Bottom, Clarendon. The elders welcomed him to “Bethel,” a facility Henry and the Peacemakers constructed decades earlier, and they shared about their relationship to the movement.

Rev. Henry (1903-1986) considered himself a prophet after experiencing a vision at age eighteen. He began preaching, eventually moving to Cuba and then America before returning to Jamaica in the 1950s to fulfill his revelation. Rev. Henry accumulated thousands of followers, and in 1959 built The African Reform Church of God in Christ. Professor Hill claims that Rev. Henry’s following constituted the largest Back-to-Africa Movement of its time. Rev. Henry traveled to Ethiopia more than once to meet with officials affiliated with Emperor Haile Selassie, considered by many Rastafarians to be the messiah (image one). Their ambitions to relocate were never realized. In 1960 Rev. Henry and fifteen others were arrested on grounds that they were plotting an insurrection against the Jamaican government. At their trial in 1960, which Professor Hill attended when he was 16, they were found guilty.

 

Peacemakers making baking bread

In 1966 Rev. Henry was released from prison and went back to his followers in the parish of Clarendon. There in Green Bottom, Rev. Henry and others built a commune called the International Peacemakers Association. The Peacemakers were self-sustaining. The pictures displayed in the album show the Peacemakers making tiles, gardening, farming, ranching, baking bread, and performing a host of other duties (images two and three). There was also a school, baptismal house, community center, and worship facility, among other structures (image four).

The picture album is a part of a separate subseries which also contains loose and mounted photographs, correspondence, receipts pertaining to the construction of the commune, programs, posters, and other materials. Collectively, they offer a rich history to researchers, and encourage scholars to ask new questions about the Rev. Henry, the Peacemakers, and their legacy.

Sources:

“Rev. Henry Picture Album,” Robert A. Hill Collection, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

“Rev. Claudius V. Henry and the Radicalization of the Rastafari Movement in Jamaica, 1957-1960,” Interview with Professor Robert A. Hill by Boris Lutanie, Reggae Vibes, Paris, France.

Alexus Bazen, “Ethnography of the International Peacemakers Association,” https://www.curf.upenn.edu/content/bazen-alexus-ethnography-international-peacemakers-association.

The post New Discoveries in the Robert A. Hill Collection: Rev. Claudius Henry and The International Peacemakers appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

New Discoveries in the Robert A. Hill Collection: Rev. Claudius Henry and The International Peacemakers

Franklin Research Center News - Tue, 05/21/2019 - 14:00

Post contributed by Meggan Cashwell, Technical Service Intern

I recently processed the latest accession to the Robert A. Hill Collection: The Jamaica Series. The series consists primarily of Professor Hill’s research on the Rastafari Movement and Rev. Claudius Henry. While evaluating the materials I came across several particularly fascinating items, including the “Rev. Henry Picture Album.” As I carefully examined each image, the history of Rev. Henry and his followers unfolded.

Emperor Haile Selassie

Professor Hill shared his extensive knowledge of Rev. Henry in an interview for Reggae Vibes. He was wrapping up a research trip in Jamaica in 2010 when he decided to spend part of the remainder of his time meeting with members of Rev. Henry’s International Peacemakers Association at Green Bottom, Clarendon. The elders welcomed him to “Bethel,” a facility Henry and the Peacemakers constructed decades earlier, and they shared about their relationship to the movement.

Rev. Henry (1903-1986) considered himself a prophet after experiencing a vision at age eighteen. He began preaching, eventually moving to Cuba and then America before returning to Jamaica in the 1950s to fulfill his revelation. Rev. Henry accumulated thousands of followers, and in 1959 built The African Reform Church of God in Christ. Professor Hill claims that Rev. Henry’s following constituted the largest Back-to-Africa Movement of its time. Rev. Henry traveled to Ethiopia more than once to meet with officials affiliated with Emperor Haile Selassie, considered by many Rastafarians to be the messiah (image one). Their ambitions to relocate were never realized. In 1960 Rev. Henry and fifteen others were arrested on grounds that they were plotting an insurrection against the Jamaican government. At their trial in 1960, which Professor Hill attended when he was 16, they were found guilty.

 

Peacemakers making baking bread

In 1966 Rev. Henry was released from prison and went back to his followers in the parish of Clarendon. There in Green Bottom, Rev. Henry and others built a commune called the International Peacemakers Association. The Peacemakers were self-sustaining. The pictures displayed in the album show the Peacemakers making tiles, gardening, farming, ranching, baking bread, and performing a host of other duties (images two and three). There was also a school, baptismal house, community center, and worship facility, among other structures (image four).

The picture album is a part of a separate subseries which also contains loose and mounted photographs, correspondence, receipts pertaining to the construction of the commune, programs, posters, and other materials. Collectively, they offer a rich history to researchers, and encourage scholars to ask new questions about the Rev. Henry, the Peacemakers, and their legacy.

Sources:

“Rev. Henry Picture Album,” Robert A. Hill Collection, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

“Rev. Claudius V. Henry and the Radicalization of the Rastafari Movement in Jamaica, 1957-1960,” Interview with Professor Robert A. Hill by Boris Lutanie, Reggae Vibes, Paris, France.

Alexus Bazen, “Ethnography of the International Peacemakers Association,” https://www.curf.upenn.edu/content/bazen-alexus-ethnography-international-peacemakers-association.

The post New Discoveries in the Robert A. Hill Collection: Rev. Claudius Henry and The International Peacemakers appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

Rubenstein Library Events - Fri, 05/17/2019 - 19:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

Rubenstein Library Events - Fri, 05/17/2019 - 18:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).

Add it Up: Duke and the Putnam Mathematics Competition

Baskin Test - Fri, 05/17/2019 - 13:06

Post contributed by Hillary Gatlin, Records Manager

William Lowell Putnam scrapbook, inside front cover

The University Archives works with offices across campus to collect and preserve university history. As part of these efforts, the William Lowell Putnam Competition scrapbook, previously on display in the Department of Mathematics, has now made its way to the University Archives for preservation.

The scrapbook describes Duke undergraduates’ participation in the William Lowell Putnam Mathematics Competition. The Putnam, which began in 1938 as a competition between college and university mathematics departments, is now the premier mathematics competition for undergraduate students. In fact, it has been repeatedly described as the “NCAA tournament” of the math world. Taking place each December, undergraduates attempt to solve challenging mathematical problems over a six hour period. This is both an individual and team competition, with prizes awarded to students with the highest scores as well as to the five institutions with the highest rankings.

This scrapbook contains press releases, correspondence, programs, and photographs related to the Department of Mathematics’ participation in the Putnam Competition. In 1993, Duke University won its first Putnam, with the team of senior Jeffrey Vanderkam, junior Craig Gentry, and freshman Andrew Dittmer taking first place. Harvard University had taken the top honors for the previous eight years. While the scrapbook focuses primarily on Duke’s first victory in 1993, it also includes some material from later years, including a photograph of Duke’s second winning team in 1996, and a copy of a Board of Trustees announcement honoring five mathematics students in 2000, when the Duke University team again took first place in the Putnam.

Photos of the Putnam Competition team from 1993

Duke University students compete in both athletics and academics. Now the victories of these undergraduates will be preserved and shared with the larger campus community as part of the University Archives.

The William Lowell Putnam Competition scrapbook was created by Dr. David Kraines, Associate Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, who leads many of the Putnam competition teams. It was transferred to the University Archives by the Department of Mathematics in April 2019.

The post Add it Up: Duke and the Putnam Mathematics Competition appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Add it Up: Duke and the Putnam Mathematics Competition

Devil's Tale Posts - Fri, 05/17/2019 - 13:06

Post contributed by Hillary Gatlin, Records Manager

William Lowell Putnam scrapbook, inside front cover

The University Archives works with offices across campus to collect and preserve university history. As part of these efforts, the William Lowell Putnam Competition scrapbook, previously on display in the Department of Mathematics, has now made its way to the University Archives for preservation.

The scrapbook describes Duke undergraduates’ participation in the William Lowell Putnam Mathematics Competition. The Putnam, which began in 1938 as a competition between college and university mathematics departments, is now the premier mathematics competition for undergraduate students. In fact, it has been repeatedly described as the “NCAA tournament” of the math world. Taking place each December, undergraduates attempt to solve challenging mathematical problems over a six hour period. This is both an individual and team competition, with prizes awarded to students with the highest scores as well as to the five institutions with the highest rankings.

This scrapbook contains press releases, correspondence, programs, and photographs related to the Department of Mathematics’ participation in the Putnam Competition. In 1993, Duke University won its first Putnam, with the team of senior Jeffrey Vanderkam, junior Craig Gentry, and freshman Andrew Dittmer taking first place. Harvard University had taken the top honors for the previous eight years. While the scrapbook focuses primarily on Duke’s first victory in 1993, it also includes some material from later years, including a photograph of Duke’s second winning team in 1996, and a copy of a Board of Trustees announcement honoring five mathematics students in 2000, when the Duke University team again took first place in the Putnam.

Photos of the Putnam Competition team from 1993

Duke University students compete in both athletics and academics. Now the victories of these undergraduates will be preserved and shared with the larger campus community as part of the University Archives.

The William Lowell Putnam Competition scrapbook was created by Dr. David Kraines, Associate Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, who leads many of the Putnam competition teams. It was transferred to the University Archives by the Department of Mathematics in April 2019.

The post Add it Up: Duke and the Putnam Mathematics Competition appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Add it Up: Duke and the Putnam Mathematics Competition

UArchives blog posts - Fri, 05/17/2019 - 13:06

Post contributed by Hillary Gatlin, Records Manager

William Lowell Putnam scrapbook, inside front cover

The University Archives works with offices across campus to collect and preserve university history. As part of these efforts, the William Lowell Putnam Competition scrapbook, previously on display in the Department of Mathematics, has now made its way to the University Archives for preservation.

The scrapbook describes Duke undergraduates’ participation in the William Lowell Putnam Mathematics Competition. The Putnam, which began in 1938 as a competition between college and university mathematics departments, is now the premier mathematics competition for undergraduate students. In fact, it has been repeatedly described as the “NCAA tournament” of the math world. Taking place each December, undergraduates attempt to solve challenging mathematical problems over a six hour period. This is both an individual and team competition, with prizes awarded to students with the highest scores as well as to the five institutions with the highest rankings.

This scrapbook contains press releases, correspondence, programs, and photographs related to the Department of Mathematics’ participation in the Putnam Competition. In 1993, Duke University won its first Putnam, with the team of senior Jeffrey Vanderkam, junior Craig Gentry, and freshman Andrew Dittmer taking first place. Harvard University had taken the top honors for the previous eight years. While the scrapbook focuses primarily on Duke’s first victory in 1993, it also includes some material from later years, including a photograph of Duke’s second winning team in 1996, and a copy of a Board of Trustees announcement honoring five mathematics students in 2000, when the Duke University team again took first place in the Putnam.

Photos of the Putnam Competition team from 1993

Duke University students compete in both athletics and academics. Now the victories of these undergraduates will be preserved and shared with the larger campus community as part of the University Archives.

The William Lowell Putnam Competition scrapbook was created by Dr. David Kraines, Associate Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, who leads many of the Putnam competition teams. It was transferred to the University Archives by the Department of Mathematics in April 2019.

The post Add it Up: Duke and the Putnam Mathematics Competition appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

SLGs Have Their Roots in Woman’s College Experiment

Baskin Test - Thu, 05/09/2019 - 18:49

Post contributed by Gia Cummings, University Archives student assistant

Among Duke’s countless unexplainable quirks are sleeping outside for a basketball game, the first-year meal plan, anything to do with the transportation system, and most mysteriously, Selective Living Groups. Prospective students are puzzled by the concept, and Duke students stammer to conjure an explanation: it functions similar to Greek life but it’s certainly not that; it’s not a club but it’s also not a friend group; you live together, but it extends beyond that—and all of these responses leave you equally as confused. Eventually, as one transitions from wide-eyed first year to aloof sophomore, the questions fall away and the social landscape becomes comprehensible. And yet, the underlying question: ‘what is an SLG?’ slips away unanswered.

Although the definition of a Selective Living Group is concrete now, it began as a nebulous idea pioneered by some innovative students of the Woman’s College, women who wanted to extend their learning into their living space. In 1961, the Women’s Student Government Association (WSGA) Council defined the reasoning for the living situation in their “Proposal for an Experimental Dormitory”:

From the “Proposal for an Experimental Dormitory,” 1961. Woman’s College Records, box 35.

This logic parallels modern-day defense of the selected living group system, wherein living with people of diverse backgrounds and thought processes is a learning experience in and of itself. The women of the Experimental Dorm, which was housed in the Faculty Apartments (Wilson Residential Hall) beginning in the fall of 1961, had varying academic talents and interests: they organized themselves with the intentions of pursuing academic stimulation, learning for the sake of learning rather than learning for a course. The women read common books to expand their knowledge, but they also extended the experimental aspect past their studies.

Wilson Residence Hall. The Experimental Dorm was housed on Wilson’s 3rd floor.

At that time, students of the Woman’s College had strict curfews and restrictions regarding their social lives and freedom, and the women of the Experimental Dorm took on an unprecedented level of self-governance. They requested self-monitoring on the tracking of their movements, along with control over the rules in their own house, and adopted a government-like structure that resembles the House Councils that each dorm currently has, with assistance from older (male) faculty members. The members organized a flexible leadership system that included rotating chairmanship and standing committees to address particular issues–including monetary ones, given that the members paid dues to be a part of this community. In this sense, and the selection process, the Experimental Dorm distinguished itself from the residential Corridors that would soon follow.

Page from “Structures and Functions of the 1961-62 Experimental Dorm.” Woman’s College Records, box 35.

Although the vision of the Experimental Dorm prioritized “intellectual orientation”, they were intentional in not pursuing a specific academic community (like the later Corridors); in fact, the girls aimed to acquire a diverse group of interests in order to promote mental stimulation. As was recognized by these women, learning stems from exposure to new concepts and ideas; they aimed to choose members that stimulate one another. This aspect was evident in the fact that the Experimental Dorm took applications followed by interviews, attempting to select candidates who reflected a passion for learning. As the women outlined in their selection guidelines, their criteria specifically stated that they did “not want grade point averages or other specific records to be used in judging the girls” and that “each choice would be made on an individual basis,” with diverse interests being of particular importance. This dorm set itself apart by incorporating a social aspect along with an academic one: the Experimental Dorm was designed to create a community, not just a study group. In this sense, the ancestry of modern SLGs is clear, the creation of a group that shares similar values beyond their academic interests, designed to grow its members as people as well as students. 

Selective Living Groups today are often praised for their ability to bring people together; to create a learning environment in the dormitory alongside the classroom. The origins of those aims can be traced directly to the goals of the women who began the Experimental Dorm: a project which began to create a community, but whose effects have grown to become an important aspect of student life at Duke to this day.

The post SLGs Have Their Roots in Woman’s College Experiment appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

SLGs Have Their Roots in Woman’s College Experiment

Devil's Tale Posts - Thu, 05/09/2019 - 18:49

Post contributed by Gia Cummings, University Archives student assistant

Among Duke’s countless unexplainable quirks are sleeping outside for a basketball game, the first-year meal plan, anything to do with the transportation system, and most mysteriously, Selective Living Groups. Prospective students are puzzled by the concept, and Duke students stammer to conjure an explanation: it functions similar to Greek life but it’s certainly not that; it’s not a club but it’s also not a friend group; you live together, but it extends beyond that—and all of these responses leave you equally as confused. Eventually, as one transitions from wide-eyed first year to aloof sophomore, the questions fall away and the social landscape becomes comprehensible. And yet, the underlying question: ‘what is an SLG?’ slips away unanswered.

Although the definition of a Selective Living Group is concrete now, it began as a nebulous idea pioneered by some innovative students of the Woman’s College, women who wanted to extend their learning into their living space. In 1961, the Women’s Student Government Association (WSGA) Council defined the reasoning for the living situation in their “Proposal for an Experimental Dormitory”:

From the “Proposal for an Experimental Dormitory,” 1961. Woman’s College Records, box 35.

This logic parallels modern-day defense of the selected living group system, wherein living with people of diverse backgrounds and thought processes is a learning experience in and of itself. The women of the Experimental Dorm, which was housed in the Faculty Apartments (Wilson Residential Hall) beginning in the fall of 1961, had varying academic talents and interests: they organized themselves with the intentions of pursuing academic stimulation, learning for the sake of learning rather than learning for a course. The women read common books to expand their knowledge, but they also extended the experimental aspect past their studies.

Wilson Residence Hall. The Experimental Dorm was housed on Wilson’s 3rd floor.

At that time, students of the Woman’s College had strict curfews and restrictions regarding their social lives and freedom, and the women of the Experimental Dorm took on an unprecedented level of self-governance. They requested self-monitoring on the tracking of their movements, along with control over the rules in their own house, and adopted a government-like structure that resembles the House Councils that each dorm currently has, with assistance from older (male) faculty members. The members organized a flexible leadership system that included rotating chairmanship and standing committees to address particular issues–including monetary ones, given that the members paid dues to be a part of this community. In this sense, and the selection process, the Experimental Dorm distinguished itself from the residential Corridors that would soon follow.

Page from “Structures and Functions of the 1961-62 Experimental Dorm.” Woman’s College Records, box 35.

Although the vision of the Experimental Dorm prioritized “intellectual orientation”, they were intentional in not pursuing a specific academic community (like the later Corridors); in fact, the girls aimed to acquire a diverse group of interests in order to promote mental stimulation. As was recognized by these women, learning stems from exposure to new concepts and ideas; they aimed to choose members that stimulate one another. This aspect was evident in the fact that the Experimental Dorm took applications followed by interviews, attempting to select candidates who reflected a passion for learning. As the women outlined in their selection guidelines, their criteria specifically stated that they did “not want grade point averages or other specific records to be used in judging the girls” and that “each choice would be made on an individual basis,” with diverse interests being of particular importance. This dorm set itself apart by incorporating a social aspect along with an academic one: the Experimental Dorm was designed to create a community, not just a study group. In this sense, the ancestry of modern SLGs is clear, the creation of a group that shares similar values beyond their academic interests, designed to grow its members as people as well as students. 

Selective Living Groups today are often praised for their ability to bring people together; to create a learning environment in the dormitory alongside the classroom. The origins of those aims can be traced directly to the goals of the women who began the Experimental Dorm: a project which began to create a community, but whose effects have grown to become an important aspect of student life at Duke to this day.

The post SLGs Have Their Roots in Woman’s College Experiment appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

SLGs Have Their Roots in Woman’s College Experiment

UArchives blog posts - Thu, 05/09/2019 - 18:49

Post contributed by Gia Cummings, University Archives student assistant

Among Duke’s countless unexplainable quirks are sleeping outside for a basketball game, the first-year meal plan, anything to do with the transportation system, and most mysteriously, Selective Living Groups. Prospective students are puzzled by the concept, and Duke students stammer to conjure an explanation: it functions similar to Greek life but it’s certainly not that; it’s not a club but it’s also not a friend group; you live together, but it extends beyond that—and all of these responses leave you equally as confused. Eventually, as one transitions from wide-eyed first year to aloof sophomore, the questions fall away and the social landscape becomes comprehensible. And yet, the underlying question: ‘what is an SLG?’ slips away unanswered.

Although the definition of a Selective Living Group is concrete now, it began as a nebulous idea pioneered by some innovative students of the Woman’s College, women who wanted to extend their learning into their living space. In 1961, the Women’s Student Government Association (WSGA) Council defined the reasoning for the living situation in their “Proposal for an Experimental Dormitory”:

From the “Proposal for an Experimental Dormitory,” 1961. Woman’s College Records, box 35.

This logic parallels modern-day defense of the selected living group system, wherein living with people of diverse backgrounds and thought processes is a learning experience in and of itself. The women of the Experimental Dorm, which was housed in the Faculty Apartments (Wilson Residential Hall) beginning in the fall of 1961, had varying academic talents and interests: they organized themselves with the intentions of pursuing academic stimulation, learning for the sake of learning rather than learning for a course. The women read common books to expand their knowledge, but they also extended the experimental aspect past their studies.

Wilson Residence Hall. The Experimental Dorm was housed on Wilson’s 3rd floor.

At that time, students of the Woman’s College had strict curfews and restrictions regarding their social lives and freedom, and the women of the Experimental Dorm took on an unprecedented level of self-governance. They requested self-monitoring on the tracking of their movements, along with control over the rules in their own house, and adopted a government-like structure that resembles the House Councils that each dorm currently has, with assistance from older (male) faculty members. The members organized a flexible leadership system that included rotating chairmanship and standing committees to address particular issues–including monetary ones, given that the members paid dues to be a part of this community. In this sense, and the selection process, the Experimental Dorm distinguished itself from the residential Corridors that would soon follow.

Page from “Structures and Functions of the 1961-62 Experimental Dorm.” Woman’s College Records, box 35.

Although the vision of the Experimental Dorm prioritized “intellectual orientation”, they were intentional in not pursuing a specific academic community (like the later Corridors); in fact, the girls aimed to acquire a diverse group of interests in order to promote mental stimulation. As was recognized by these women, learning stems from exposure to new concepts and ideas; they aimed to choose members that stimulate one another. This aspect was evident in the fact that the Experimental Dorm took applications followed by interviews, attempting to select candidates who reflected a passion for learning. As the women outlined in their selection guidelines, their criteria specifically stated that they did “not want grade point averages or other specific records to be used in judging the girls” and that “each choice would be made on an individual basis,” with diverse interests being of particular importance. This dorm set itself apart by incorporating a social aspect along with an academic one: the Experimental Dorm was designed to create a community, not just a study group. In this sense, the ancestry of modern SLGs is clear, the creation of a group that shares similar values beyond their academic interests, designed to grow its members as people as well as students. 

Selective Living Groups today are often praised for their ability to bring people together; to create a learning environment in the dormitory alongside the classroom. The origins of those aims can be traced directly to the goals of the women who began the Experimental Dorm: a project which began to create a community, but whose effects have grown to become an important aspect of student life at Duke to this day.

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Exhibit Tour of "Five Hundred Years of Women's Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection"

Rubenstein Library Events - Fri, 05/03/2019 - 19:00
Mary Duke Biddle Room (Rubenstein Library)West Campus

Please join us for a highlights tour of the exhibition “Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.” Guided tours led by Rubenstein Library staff are offered every Friday, March 8-June 14, 2019, at 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Registration is recommended but not required. Tours will meet inside the Mary Duke Biddle Exhibit Suite and will last about 30 minutes. If you have questions or need to request parking accommodations for accessibility, please contact Kelly Wooten (919-660-5967; kelly.wooten@duke.edu).