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Guide to the Activating the Archive Student Projects Collection, 2015

Summary

Creative projects produced by students in Activating the Archive: Archival Research as Documentary Practice, DOCST 316-01 / 716-01 / ARTVIS 316-01 / VMS 314S-01, taught by Lisa McCarty in the Rubenstein Library in the Fall of 2015. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Art (Duke University).

Collection Details

Collection Number
RL.11215
Title
Activating the Archive student projects collection
Date
2015
Extent
0.5 Linear Feet, 1 box; 7 computer files; 10.6 Gigabytes
Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Language
Materials in English

Collection Overview

Creative projects produced by students in Activating the Archive: Archival Research as Documentary Practice, DOCST 316-01 / 716-01 / ARTVIS 316-01 / VMS 314S-01, taught by Lisa McCarty in the Rubenstein Library in the Fall of 2015. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Art (Duke University).

Materials have been arranged by student name.

More Biographical / Historical Info

Using These Materials

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 2 full business days in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access to the Collection

Original film is closed to use. Contact Research Services in advance to request the production of viewing copies.

Collection is open for research.

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

All or portions of this collection may be housed off-site in Duke University's Library Service Center. The library may require up to 48 hours to retrieve these materials for research use.

Electronic records in this collection have been migrated to a library server and digital use copies can only be accessed onsite in the Rubenstein Library Reading Room.

Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library to use this collection.

warning Use & Permissions

The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

More copyright and citation information

How to Cite

[Identification of item], Activating the Archive Student Projects Collection, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Contents of the Collection

Hopkins, Kelsey, 2015

Hopkins' abstract: “This work explores the practice of extra-illustration, or grangerization: the act of supplementing the illustrative content of a book with additional images, prints, drawings, ect. not found in the original work. For my project I have extra-illustrated the 1961 edition of William Faulkner’s Selected Short Stories which I discovered in a used book store in downtown Durham. The book has been extra-illustrated with 7 images from various collections related to Faulkner housed in the Rubenstein Library as well as one original illustration on the title page.”

Collections and books from which images were drawn from:

Mattie U. Russell Collection on William Faulkner, 1919-1987; The making of William Faulkner's books, 1929-1937 : an interview with Evelyn Harter Glick; & "William Faulkner's speech of acceptance upon the award of the Nobel prize for literature, delivered in Stockholm on the tenth of December, nineteen hundred fifty," by William Faulkner.

Selected Short Stories by William Faulkner, Extra-Illustrated Edition, 2015
Box 1
Lin, Katherine Amy, 2015

Lin's abstract: “Inner View is a zine which opens up a dialogue between the Phyllis Chesler papers, women’s prescriptive literature, and writings about mental illness in feminist zines from the Sarah Dyer and Amy Markaiaskin Collections in the Rubenstein Library. The title is aligned with the purpose of the work: through a condensation and organization of zine material, placed in context with the materials of the Chesler papers on women and psychiatric treatment, to give a clear voice to those who have faced sexism in their mental health journeys, and to tell a broader feminist story.”

Incorporates Materials from:

The Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History & Culture including the Phyllis Chesler Papers; the Sarah Dyer Zine Collection; and the Amy Mariaskin Zine Collection

inner view. (a zine of sines and writings), 2015 Winter
Box 1
Rubin, Rachel, 2015

Rubin's abstract: “Design for a Duchess was published by Duke University’s Social Standards Committee from 1954-1963 and was sent out to all incoming freshman girls. The pamphlet was meant to welcome them to Duke, but more importantly it gave specific instructions about traditions and behavioral standards that they would be expected to uphold during their time at Duke. The publication uses the idea of a “Duchess” as a model of good manners and grace, the supposed ultimate goal of every young woman entering the University. My modern version of Design for a Duchess is a satire of the original and an examination of the implicit beauty and behavioral standards that women at Duke are still affected by in 2015. It is written as if it were to be distributed to the women of the class of 2016 and on.”

Inspired by Design for a Duchess, part of the Freshman Life Reference Collection in University Archives.

Electronic records in this series have been migrated to a library server and digital use copies can only be accessed onsite in the Rubenstein Library Reading Room. To request access, please contact Research Services before coming to use these records.

“Design for a Duchess” zine, related ephemera, 2015
Box 1
Audio interviews
(5 MPEG-4 audio files, approximately 0.05 gigabytes.)

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Title: Activating the Archive Fall 2015 Student Projects

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Title: Colleen Scott interviewed by Rachel Rubin

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Title: Kelly Wooten interviewed by Rachel Rubin

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Title: Sally Kornbluth interviewed by Rachel Rubin

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Title: Sumathi Ramaswamy interviewed by Rachel Rubin

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Title: Valerie Gillispie interviewed by Rachel Rubin

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Smith, Daniel V., 2015

Smith's abstract: No sight but thine and mine is an experimental short-form documentary revealing the nature of ocular prosthetic technology housed at Duke University. In the History of Medicine Collections, resides a mysterious box of antique prosthetic glass eyes of unknown origin and purpose. These eyes are beautiful, but serve no function for the wearer. On the other side of campus, at the Duke Eye Center, patients are receiving cutting-edge prosthetic implants that are allowing those who’ve lost their sight to see the world in a completely new way that those of us with traditional sight are unable to replicate. The title is drawn from Act 1, Scene 2 of William Shakespeare’s The Tempest – part of the line which marks the first use of the word ‘eyeball’ in recorded history.

Incorporates footage of objects from the History of Medicine artifacts collections.

Electronic records in this series have been migrated to a library server and digital use copies can only be accessed onsite in the Rubenstein Library Reading Room. To request access, please contact Research Services before coming to use these records.

Related correspondence, 2015
Box 1
no sight but thine and mine, 2015
(1 MPEG-4 video file, approximately 10 gigabytes.)

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Title: no sigth but thine and mine

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Thomas, Christopher, 2015

Thomas's abstract: A Fixed Facsimile is an experimental documentary film examining the extent that physically and digitally archived works of text can be captured and presented in the form of moving images using simple machines without electricity to mimic the conditions under which the content was first created. Both the physical artifact and the digitally archived version of The Mathematical and Philosophical Works of the Right Reverend John Wilkins, originally published in 1708, were photographed on a Bolex 16mm camera with a disengaged motor. Documentation of the actual book is paired with images of its digital interface to create a feedback loop in the genealogy of new media and forms of communication, as older ones like the book itself are literally falling apart.

The fluttering exposures were achieved by cranking the film through the camera’s gate by hand at a rate of 1/4 to 1/8 of a second. The film was then processed and allowed to dry with the fixer still on the film, creating crystallized textures upon the images.

Incorporates images from the book: The mathematical and philosophical works of the Right Reverend John Wilkins by John Wilkins

Original film is closed to use. Contact Research Services in advance to request production of viewing copies.

Electronic records in this series have been migrated to a library server and digital use copies can only be accessed onsite in the Rubenstein Library Reading Room. To request access, please contact Research Services before coming to use these records.

16mm film, 2015
(Electronic materials consist of 1 MPEG-4 video file, approximately 0.66 gigabytes.)
Film-reel 1

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Title: Activating the Archive Fall 2015 Student Projects

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Title: A Fixed Facsimile

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Historical Note

The course introduces students to methods of archival research and investigates the archive as a tool for creative and scholarly use within documentary practice. Using Duke’s Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript library students gained practical experience to effectively locate, retrieve, handle, document and analyze primary source materials. This knowledge was then applied to produce original written and multimedia documentary projects that rethink notions of history, identity, memory, and loss. The class also explored individual and open source archives, as well as works by contemporary artists and documentarians who mediate archival materials and structures. The course emphasis is to encounter the archive as a site of discovery and construction.


Click to find related materials at Duke University Libraries.

Provenance

The Activating the Archive Student Projects Collection was received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a transfer in 2016.

Processing Information

Processed by Meghan Lyon and Matthew Farrell, June 2016

Accessions described in this collection guide: 2016-0042