Menu

Guide to the Susan B. Anthony Letters to Minnie C. Rodey, 1905

Summary

Collection contains two letters Susan B. Anthony wrote on National American Woman Suffrage Association letterhead in February 1905 to Minnie C. Rodey, who was chair of the "Women's Club" in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In the letters, Anthony described informational material she will be sending Rodey, including a history of woman suffrage. In addition, she recommended a process by which the territory would vote on the issue of woman's suffrage before it acquiring statehood, since she considered the legislature and governor more likely to pass it than the general male voters in the state. She added, "... I read yesterday of the number of Indians and Mexicans and negroes that were in the territories. It is amazing that people want to make a state out of a territory composed of a majority of what we should term 'incompetents' Voting should be confined to intelligent beings." She also inquired of mutual friends and recommends her relatives who are visiting Albuquerque.

Collection Details

Collection Number
RL.11201
Title
Susan B. Anthony letters to Minnie C. Rodey
Date
1905
Extent
0.1 Linear Feet, 2 items
Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Language
Materials in English

Collection Overview

Collection contains two letters Susan B. Anthony wrote on National American Woman Suffrage Association letterhead in February 1905 to Minnie C. Rodey, who was chair of the "Women's Club" in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In the letters, Anthony described informational material she will be sending Rodey, including a history of woman suffrage. In addition, she recommended a process by which the territory would vote on the issue of woman's suffrage before it acquiring statehood, since she considered the legislature and governor more likely to pass it than the general male voters in the state. She added, "... I read yesterday of the number of Indians and Mexicans and negroes that were in the territories. It is amazing that people want to make a state out of a territory composed of a majority of what we should term 'incompetents' Voting should be confined to intelligent beings." She also inquired of mutual friends and recommends her relatives who are visiting Albuquerque. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

More Biographical / Historical Info

Using These Materials

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 2 full business days in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access to the Collection

Collection is open for research.

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

All or portions of this collection may be housed off-site in Duke University's Library Service Center. The library may require up to 48 hours to retrieve these materials for research use.

Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library to use this collection.

warning Use & Permissions

The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

More copyright and citation information

How to Cite

[Identification of item], Susan B. Anthony letters to Minnie C. Rodey, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Contents of the Collection

Letters
Folder 1
 

Historical Note

Susan B. Anthony was born February 15, 1820 in Adams, Massachusetts. She was brought up in a Quaker family with long activist traditions. Early in her life she developed a sense of justice and moral zeal. After teaching for fifteen years, she became active in temperance. Because she was a woman, she was not allowed to speak at temperance rallies. This experience, and her acquaintance with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, led her to join the women's rights movement in 1852. Soon after, she dedicated her life to woman suffrage. Ignoring opposition and abuse, Anthony traveled, lectured, and canvassed across the nation for the vote. She also campaigned for the abolition of slavery, the right for women to own their own property and retain their earnings, and she advocated for women's labor organizations. In 1900, Anthony persuaded the University of Rochester to admit women. Anthony, who never married, was aggressive and compassionate by nature. She had a keen mind and a great ability to inspire. She remained active until her death on March 13, 1906.


Click to find related materials at Duke University Libraries.

Provenance

The Susan B. Anthony letters to Minnie C. Rodey were received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a purchase in 2013.

Processing Information

Processed by Alice Poffinberger, May 2014

Accessions described in this collection guide: 2013-0121