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Guide to the Emma Goldman Papers, 1909-1941 and undated

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Summary

Emma Goldman was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing, and speeches. She played a pivotal role in the development of anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the 20th century. The Emma Goldman papers feature over 300 letters, primarily written by Emma Goldman, although other anarchists, activists, and thinkers are represented as authors, including Alexander Berkman, Eugene Debs, Harry Kelly, Alexander Shapiro, and the Socialist Party of New England. Many of the letter recipients are unnamed (as "Comrade"), but the majority of the letters were directed to Thomas H. Keell, an English compositor and editor for the anarchist periodical Freedom, in London. Letter topics most often center around requests made of Keell in support of various writing projects as well as speaking engagements and organizing work completed in Europe, the United States, and Canada, but also touch on visa constraints for Goldman and Berkman, the state of the anarchist movement in various countries, the lack of support for anarchist publications, as well as general position statements, especially in regard to Soviet Russia and the Spanish Civil War. There are also papers related to various prominent anarchists. These include typescript drafts of four articles and letters by anarchists; nine handwritten articles on anarchist themes written in Italian by Errico Malatesta; publications; press releases; ephemera, including tickets, brochures, solicitation letters, handbills and flyers; a contract and room layout for speaking engagements; Thomas H. Keell's list of works on anarchism; newspaper clippings; and six black-and-white photographs. The Emma Goldman papers are part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.

Collection Details

Collection Number
RL.11353
Title
Emma Goldman papers
Date
1909-1941 and undated
Creator
Goldman, Emma, 1869-1940
Extent
0.8 Linear Feet
Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Language
Materials in English and Italian

Collection Overview

The Emma Goldman papers feature over 300 letters, primarily written by Emma Goldman, although other anarchists, activists, and thinkers are represented as authors, including Alexander Berkman, Eugene Debs, Harry Kelly, Alexander Shapiro, and the Socialist Party of New England. Many of the letter recipients are unnamed (as "Comrade"), but the majority of the letters were directed to Thomas H. Keell, an English compositor and editor for the anarchist periodical Freedom, in London. Letter topics most often center around requests made of Keell in support of various writing projects as well as speaking engagements and organizing work completed in Europe, the United States, and Canada, but also touch on visa constraints for Goldman and Berkman, the state of the anarchist movement in various countries, the lack of support for anarchist publications, as well as general position statements, especially in regard to Soviet Russia and the Spanish Civil War. There are also papers related to various prominent anarchists. These include typescript drafts of four articles and letters by anarchists; nine handwritten articles on anarchist themes written in Italian by Errico Malatesta; publications; press releases; ephemera, including tickets, brochures, solicitation letters, handbills and flyers; a contract and room layout for speaking engagements; Thomas H. Keell's list of works on anarchism; newspaper clippings; and six black-and-white photographs.

More Biographical / Historical Info

Arrangement

Organized into the following series: Letters and papers.

Using These Materials

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Collection is open for research.

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The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

More copyright and citation information

How to Cite

[Identification of item], Emma Goldman Papers, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Contents of the Collection

1. Letters, 1909-1941 and undated

The Letters Series features over 300 letters, primarily written by Emma Goldman, although other anarchists, activists, and thinkers are represented as authors, including Alexander Berkman, Eugene Debs, Harry Kelly, Alexander Shapiro, and the Socialist Party of New England. Many of the letter recipients are unnamed (as "Comrade"), but the majority of the letters were directed to Thomas H. Keell, an English compositor and editor for the anarchist periodical Freedom, in London. Letter topics most often center around requests made of Keell in support of various writing projects as well as speaking engagements and organizing work completed in Europe, the United States, and Canada, but also touch on visa constraints for Goldman and Berkman, the state of the anarchist movement in various countries, the lack of support for anarchist publications, as well as general position statements, especially in regard to Soviet Russia and the Spanish Revolution.

Alexander Berkman (New York) to Thomas H. Keell (London), 1914 February 17
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Berkman sends money and requests pamphlets. He also regrets Keell's news regarding the Labor Movement in England, pointing out that it wasn't the impression in the United States that the dock strike of 1912 and the miners strike were successful.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Stockholm, Sweden) to Thomas H. Keell (n.p.), 1922 January 12
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 24 cm)

Berkman provides instructions for printing an appeal. He notes his plan to write for FREEDOM.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Stockholm, Sweden) to Thomas H. Keell (n.p.), 1922 February 1
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 23 cm)

Berkman encloses an article for FREEDOM

Box 1
Folder 1
[Alexander Berkman] (Stockholm, Sweden) to Comrade R. R. [Rudolf Rocker], 1922 February 11
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 36 cm)

Berkman attempts to locate his missing diary, hoping that it is in Rocker's possession. He also writes his opinion of the New York World and the reasons he is moving forward to publish anarchist ideas in pamphlet form, rather than use the capitalist press. He would like Rocker's opinion on the matter.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Stockholm, Sweden) to Thomas H. Keell (n.p.), 1922 February 15
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 23 cm)

Berkman sends replies to items written in other publications. He requests that Keell call him "Alexander Berkman" so that he will not be confused with the Russian Communist writer, A. Berkman.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Stockholm, Sweden) to {Thomas H.] K[eell] (n.p.), 1922 February 27
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 22 cm)

Berkman outlines instructions for printing several items in FREEDOM, and expresses his support for that publication's becoming a weekly.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Stockholm, Sweden) to Thomas H. Keell (n.p.), [1922] March 2
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 11 cm)

Berkman encloses an article for immediate publication; reminds Keell to use his full name in publication.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Stockholm, Sweden) to Thomas H. Keell (n.p.), 1922 March 14
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 17 cm)

Berkman recaps his recent letters, then reports on his travel plans, since he will soon be forced by the authorities to leave Stockholm.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Stockholm, Sweden) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), [1922] March 29
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 35 cm)

Berkman describes his trouble getting travel visas in Europe, then outlines changes in Russian unions.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), [1922] May 9
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 22 cm)

Berkman requests clippings of all his articles, and provides instructions for mailing them to his Berlin address.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to Thos.[Thomas H. Keell] (n.p.), 1922 May 16
(3 Leaves, 3 pages; 27 cm)

Berkman provides instructions for sending money via traveller's cheques, then comments on the development of a pamphlet. In a postscript, he outlines the reasons why any letters from members of the "Karelin group" in Russia, who are not recognized as comrades, may be ignored.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrades Keell [Thomas H. Keell] and [William C.] Owen (n.p.), 1922 May 25
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 29 cm)

Berkman seeks signatures for a manifesto regarding "Bolshevik persecution of the Anarchist, anarcho-syndicalist and other left-wing elements in Russia."

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to Thomas H. Keell (n.p.), 1922 June 8
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Berkman writes that he has finished the first of a series of pamphlets on the Russian Revolution, asking if Keell will serve as a distributor. Signed "S."

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (n.p.) to "K" [Thomas H. Keell] (n.p.), 1922 June 14
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Berkman makes arrangements to send Keell the requested copies of his completed pamphlet.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to "THK" [Thomas H. Keell] (n.p.), 1922 June 29
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 29 cm)

Berkman notes that he has mailed the copies of his pamphlet and has received a new typewriter. He arranges for a friend to make a special contribution to Keell for publishing her articles, and discusses the possible price of the pamphlet.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), [1922] July 13
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 33 cm)

Berkman expresses appreciation that Keell likes his pamphlet, but writes of his concern that Keell's publication does not receive enough material support, and hopes he will not have to suspend publication. Requests that Keell give timely publicity to the Manifesto.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (n.p.) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1922 August 26
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Berkman requests copies of his book and pamphlet, then announces that he has the second pamphlet in the series ready for publication. Signed "S."

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to T[homas] H. [Keell] (n.p.), 1922 Sept. 6
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 29 cm)

Berkman notes that the second pamphlet will soon ship to Keell, then discusses advertising for it in FREEDOM. He writes regarding of an article that "contains only the old worn out arguments of the stand-pat bolsheviki." He then comments on the material support for FREEDOM that has come from Japan. Signed "S." The letter is accompanied by a receipt for Keell's contribution to the fund for Anarchists imprisoned by Bolsheviks.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (n.p.) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1922 November 18
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 29 cm)

Berkman requests that Keell send any funds he has on hand that can be sent to Russia.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (n.p.) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1922 November 30
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 29 cm)

Berkman writes that he has completed the third pamphlet in his series on the Russian Revolution and asks Keell how many copies to send. He also inquires how the other pamphlets are selling.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (n.p.) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1922 December 3
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 29 cm)

Berkman writes that of a shortage of pamphlets in the United States and requests Keell to act as supplier. He imagines how his third pamphlet will be misrepresented in Russia, and acknowledges that another anarchist publication, Free Society, has gone under. Signed "S."

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1923 September 30
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 29 cm)

Berkman mentions a "terrible disaster" in Japan, and that the firm there still needs to pay for pamphlets he sent. He goes on to discuss exchange rates and the preference for pounds or dollars over valuta. He adds that he has not been well, and has been unable to work on his book. Signed "S."

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1923 November 7
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Berkman again discusses the poor exchange rates for payments made in pounds. Signed "S."

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (n.p.) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1923 Decenber 26
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 23 cm)

Berkman sends his financial report for 1923, with instructions for printing, particularly in regard to explaining funds for support of all Russian prisoners versus anarchist Russian prisoners.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to Th{omas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1924 July 25
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 30 cm)

Berkman reports that he has been unable to find a publisher for his "pscychologic" study of the Russian revolution. He then notes that Emma Goldman will soon be traveling to England; news which must be kept confidential. He requests that Keell publish a note that the Joint Committee has issued 4 picture postcards to be sold as a fundraiser for imprisoned revolutionaries in Russia.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1924 August 5
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 30 cm)

Berkman writes regarding publishing a reply to Guy Aldred in FREEDOM.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1924 November 20
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 29 cm)

Berkman requests publication of an enclosed note. In a postscript he writes that he hears regularly from Emma Goldman, and another friend has brought news from London.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to My dear old friend [Thomas H. Keell] (n.p.), 1924 December 5
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 29 cm)

Berkman describes how he will distribute Keell's donation for revolutionaries imprisoned in Russia. He mentions an earthquake in Japan and that he understands Emma Goldman will soon be holding meetings in England.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1925 August 26
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Berkman writes that he has made inquiries regarding M. Acharya, who is fine. He outlines publications to be sent to Acharya. Berkman comments on general labor conditions in Europe. He notes that he hears regularly from Emma Goldman, who has become close to her contacts in Bristol, England.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1925 August 31
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 23 cm)

Berkman thanks Keell for payment on his books and asks him to mail a copy of the Bolshevik Myth to France, for France permits revolutionary mailings from England, but not Germany.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Berlin, Germany) to T.H.K. [Thomas H. Keell] (n.p.), 1925? December 9
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 29 cm)

Berkman provides Keell with his new address.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (New York?) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1927? May 8
(2 Leaves, 4 pages; 28 cm)

Berkman comments off the record regarding the lack of support from the I.W.W. for unemployment and anti-militarist movements.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (St. Cloud, France) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1927 February 10
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Berkman recounts his shock at Keell's plan to cease publication of FREEDOM, and wonders why their movement has not garnered broader support.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (St. Cloud, France) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1927 April 24
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Berkman reports that he has been asked to write a book on anarchism by the Anarchist Federation of the U.S. and requests that Keell send him pamphlets and books he can use as reference works. He notes that all his books were seized in N. Y. during his arrest for deportation.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (St. Cloud, France) to Thos. [Thomas] H. Keell (London, England), [1927] May 5
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 9 cm)

Berkman writes a postcard to list the books he has recently received. He points out that Havel is also writing a book on anarchism. He welcomes Keell's help with material for his own book.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (n.p.) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1927 June 20
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Berkman states that he will write an ABC of Communist Anarchism and outlines his plan for the book.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (St. Cloud, France) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1927 October 4
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Berkman acknowledges receipt of funds on behalf of "imprisoned comrades in Russia." He then admits that he has done very little work on his book. He adds that Vanguard Press has issued a collection of Kropotkin's pamphlets, compiled by Roger Baldwin, of whom he doesn't have a high opinion. In a postscript, Berkman reports that Emma Goldman has not been well, and that he thinks the Canadian climate does not agree with her. He also requests Keell get him a three-month subscription to the Manchester Guardian.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (St. Cloud, France) to Tom [Thomas H. Keell] (London, England), 1927 October 12
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Berkman reports in a postcard that he is receiving the Manchester Guardian, but would like the weekly edition.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (St. Cloud, France) to Tom [Thomas H. Keell] (London, England), [1927] October 30
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Berkman notes in a postcard that he is receiving the weekly edition of the Manchester Guardian, but finds it "as empty as a bottle of whiskey after a few Russians have been at it." He asks that the subscription be allowed to expire.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (St. Cloud, France) to K. [Thomas H. Keell] (London, England), 1927 November 10
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Berkman thanks Keell for the New Leader, which he reads with greater interest than the Guardian. He requests the address for Roubchinsky. He adds that Emma Goldman has not been well in Toronto.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (n.p.) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1927 December 21
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 23 cm)

Berkman asks Keell to fulfill a request for a copy of his memoirs.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (St. Cloud, France) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1929 February 27
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Berkman writes that about his translation of the drama The Prisoner, and announces that his book is on the press. He regrets that Freedom is no longer being published. He then outlines his plan to collect First Flight covers.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (St. Cloud, France) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1929 March 7
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Berkman writes more about his plan to collect First Flight stamps and envelopes.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (St. Cloud, France) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1929 March 20
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Berkman writes to urgently request the special air mail envelopes for the flight from London to Karachi, India.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (St. Cloud, France) to Tom [Thomas H. Keell] (Stroud, England), [1929] March 21
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Berkman repeats in a postcard his request for special air mail envelopes, then reports that his book will soon be ready.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Paris, France) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1930 January 12
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Berkman writes about the state of the movement in Great Britain and in France. He also discusses possible reviews for his book.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Paris, France) to T.H.K. [Thomas H. Keell] (Stroud, England), 1930 January 30
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

In a postcard, Berkman thanks Keell for sending out review copies and wonders if books can be offered for sale.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Anvers, Belgium.) to H.K. [Thomas H. Keell] (n.p.), 1930 May 9
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 21 cm)

Berkman announces that he has been suddenly expelled from France, but that friends are attempting to get him back into the country. The news is confidential. He comments on attacks made on Keell in the new Freedom journal.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (St. Tropez, France) to Thomas [Thomas H. Keell] (Stroud, England), 1930 December 2
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

In a postcard, Berkman sends appreciation for being remembered by his friends.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Nice, France) to Comrade [Thomas H. Keell] (Stroud, England), 1934 March 28
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Berkman requests a copy of a pamphlet be mailed to him.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Nice, France) to [Thomas H.] Keell (Stroud, England), 1934 April 28
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Berkman comments on the state of the anarchist movement. "...Now would seem to be a most favorable time to spread our ideas.... E. G. [Emma Goldman] writes me from the U.S. that she finds there a very vital interest in our ideas.... On the other hand Fascism seems to be growing everywhere."

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (St. Tropez, France) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1934 October 31
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Berkman discusses his case for residency in France, and his possible deportation.

Box 1
Folder 1
Alexander Berkman (Paris, France) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), [193?] December 18
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Berkman comments on the state of the movement: "There seems very little life.... Our people are indifferent and inactive. Sometimes it makes me feel very depressed." He then mentions the possibility of a Russian translation of his Prison Memoirs, and requests two more copies of the book be sent to him.

Box 1
Folder 1
Eugene V. Debs (Terre Haute, Indiana) to W. S. Van Valkenburgh (New York, N.Y.), 1926 January 15
(3 Leaves, 3 pages; 28 cm)

Debs describes the respect and personal regard he has for Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman, and is at a loss as to why they have been treated so harshly by the United States and Soviet governments.

Box 1
Folder 2
Eugene V. Debs (Terre Haute, Indiana) to W. S. Van Valkenburgh (New York, N.Y.), 1926 January 28
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Debs outlines his differences of opinion with Van Valkenburgh. He doesn't agree that Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman should have expected the treatment they received by the Soviet government or that anarchists would be silenced under a socialist government.

Box 1
Folder 2
Emma Goldman (New York) to Comrade (n.p.), 1909 April 13
(4 Leaves, 7 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman sends money for support and explains why she cannot send more. She lectures in New York 3-4 times a week, but says that the U.S.A. is driving her to desperation, mostly through attempts to deprive her of citizenship. She states "It's like being condemned to life long exile." It has forced her to cancel planned trips to England, Scotland, and Australia. She adds that she is more determined than ever to go on until the end. She notes that sales of literature have been poor, and that once they settle accounts, she will send more money.

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (New York City) to Mr. Stokes (n.p.), 1909 September 10
(8 Leaves, 16 pages; 25 cm)

Goldman defends herself from Stokes' charge that she is a bully, and warns him not to believe newspaper reports. She outlines her methods for obtaining speaking venues, and the harsh response routinely received from police. She defends her right to free speech, and describes the work of the free speech committee. She tells Stokes that whether he assists with the cause is his own affair.

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (New York City) to Mr. Stokes (n.p.), 1909 September 16
(2 Leaves, 4 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman thanks Stokes for his "kind reply and contribution." She describes her plan to release some of her lectures in pamphlet form, then relates how newspaper coverage is often incorrect in coverage of radicals, stating "It is not to be expected that daily papers will report anything correctly pertaining to the revolutionary movement."

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (New York City) to Mr. Stokes (n.p.), 1910 December 20
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Goldman asks Stokes to clarify his subscription to her book.

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman to Thos. H. Keell (London, England), 1914 November 24
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman writes that she has been lecturing on the war and "on the Drama" but has gotten great satisfaction about lecturing on the war. She notes Mother Earth's reply to Kropotkin's article on war and capitalism, and her feelings regarding the matter. She announces that Alexander Berkman has been arrested in New York City and is awaiting trial, but is successfully holding meetings in Pittsburgh.

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (New York) to Comrade (n.p.), 1915 February 22
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Goldman makes a payment to her account and a contribution to Freedom. She then states "Am so glad you are going to remain on the paper.... I had hoped to get an article from you." She adds that there is 'an awakened interest" in Anarchist thought in the East, and it is hers to address, with Alexander Berkman away. She closes with "Should the English papers have brought any statements said to be made by Berkman, I hop[e] you will contradict them because he has made no statements, they were faked up by the press."

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (New York) to Comrade (n.p.), 1915 April 23
(3 Leaves, 3 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman writes that her successful tour means that many of their debts have been paid. She then mentions the arrest of four comrades, and the cases against them. She then outlines Mother Earth's stance on Peter Kropotkin's views. She adds that she will not be ordering any pamphlets, because they have decided to carry less of a load of printed material than in the past.

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (New York) to Comrade (n.p.), 1916 April 11
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman writes of her arrest and the case against her, and her plans not to make birth control the central issue in the case, unlike Margaret Sanger. She asks for more information regarding the current situation in England, and asks about "the old man" [Kropotkin?] and his views. She then relates the situation regarding the arrest of the Magons and Caplan, and how her energies are tapped. by the defense of Caplan.

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (Moscow) to Comrade [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1921 May 29
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 11 cm)

Goldman requests that Keell write news of England and send copies of Freedom.

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (Stockholm, Sweden) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 January 9
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 35 cm)

Goldman writes briefly about her imprisonment in Russia and about Communist refusal to criticise the Bolsheviki, but uses the majority of the letter to respond to a letter in Freedom falsely crediting the anarchists with "glorying in having helped counter-revolutionaries or taking credit for that particular bomb."

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (Stockholm, Sweden) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 January 30
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 36 cm)

Goldman writes that she expects to soon be expelled from Sweden but despairs of finding anywhere else in Europe to go. She rejects the misrepresentations of Bolshevik Russia by a writer, Lansbury. She announces that the New York World would like to publish her articles but cannot decide "whether one is to make use of them rather than to have them make use of me." She discusses her traditional methods for publishing her views, via pamphlet, and how it is no longer easy to circulate them. She adds that any interested publisher will have to pay for her writing, including her book.

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (Stockholm, Sweden) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 March 1
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 29 cm)

Goldman writes at length about her stay with Alexander Berkman in Russia, including the conditions and political interpretations surrounding their stay, as well as her lack of desire to respond to Communist critics. She outlines the articles she plans to write regarding those events. She then describes their trouble in getting visas.

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 May 2
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 29 cm)

Goldman writes that she has obtained a visa to remain in Germany for a month, she hopes longer, but that this does not resolve her visa problem. Either she can go before the United States Supreme Court to discuss her citizenship or she can marry to resolve the problem. She requests feedback regarding her articles published in the World. In a postscript she notes that a friend has been questioned by Scotland Yard as a result of connections with her.

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 May 9
(1 Leaves, 3 pages; 29 cm)

Goldman offers to pay to have her articles published in one issue of Freedom, and requests that Keell or [William C.] Owen write a statement of support of her publishing the pieces in the World. She relates the experience of an Chinese anarchist, and outlines the corrupt practices of Hillman and Foster, two Americans recently returned from Russia.

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 May 14
(4 Leaves, 7 pages; 29 cm)

Goldman supplies details regarding the publication of her articles in Freedom. She defends herself against charges that the American Secret Service supported her stay in Russia. She comments on the lack of Bolshevik sources for her work, as well as on a potential plan for her to marry in order to resolve her visa problems.

Box 1
Folder 3
Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 May 28
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 21 cm)

Goldman points out a paragraph that was accidentally deleted from one of her articles, and requests its reinsertion.

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Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade (n.p.), [1922] July 13
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 33 cm)

Goldman writes that she has been uncharacteristically out of spirits and unable to write letters, but must now pull herself together in order to write her book on Russia, requested by Harper Bros. She corrects an impression that she intended to marry William C. Owen to resolve her visa issues, and says she has put any such proposal behind her; she hopes to continue her stay in Germany.

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Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 August 3
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 33 cm)

Goldman makes plans for a pamphlet, then notes Bertrand Russell's failed attempt to get her a visa for England, despite her plan to remain in Germany. She adds that she has completed 5 chapters of her book, and has sent them to the president of Harper Bros. She outlines the difficulty of her plans to continue writing.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 September 21
(3 Leaves, 3 pages; 29 cm)

Goldman comments on her inability to find people in the United States to put forth her views, on the opposition to her printing her views on Russia in the New York World, and on Bill Haywood. She provides a brief update on the progress of her book, before outlining details regarding the publishing of her pamphlet.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 October 2
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 29 cm)

Goldman discusses her need of typewriter supplies, then requests a copy of a manuscript she sent to Freedom in 1921 regarding arrests in Russia. She notes that she is moving again.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 October 12
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 29 cm)

Goldman again discusses typewriter supplies, then makes requests for articles from Freedom.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 October 28
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 29 cm)

Goldman discusses her plans to help distribute the pamphlet, and mentions that she is nearing the end of her book and her difficulties judging the merit of her work. She requests publications to be mailed to a student in America.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 November 5
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 29 cm)

Goldman writes at length about how to end her book on the Russian revolution, then comments on a man who will be deported from Russia.

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Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade (n.p.), 1922 December 5
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 33 cm)

Goldman writes with complaints about the cost of publishing her pamphlet and the public announcement that she paid to print it. She then writes about finishing her book.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade (n.p.), [1922]
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 23 cm)

Goldman requests copies of Freedom and an approach to a London publisher regarding books by her and Alexander Berkman on Russia. She notes that prices are high in Stockholm, and that they would get rich quickly if they wrote for the American Press, which they are unwilling to do.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade (n.p.), 1923 March 2
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 33 cm)

Goldman states that she has completed a tribute to Rudolf Rocker in honor of his birthday that she would like to publish in Freedom.

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Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade (n.p.), 1923 April 6
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 29 cm)

Goldman comments on edits to be made to her article on Rudolf Rocker before it is published, that she has come to terms with the cost of her pamphlet, then on how each of them is now imprisoned in their own country. She despairs about the publication of her book, and closes with comments on the inability of the movement to support the publication of Freedom.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1924 January 4
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman writes to arrange a meeting. She notes that their meeting venue might back out because of the possibility of trouble, and that the preliminary report of the Trade Union Mission has disrupted all of the work she had accomplished in London thus far, and points out there will be difficulties in their future work on Russia. She feels discouraged, but "one must go on."

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Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade (n.p.), 1924 Februrary 28
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 29 cm)

Goldman writes of the "Bolshevik superstition" that has taken over the anarchist movement, especially in the United States. She adds that "Every day convinces me of the imperative need of a relentless criticism and attack against that gang in Moscow that has poisoned the whole world..." She then reports on the "muddle" that was made of her book, with "13 chapters omitted and the title changed."

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Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade (n.p.), 1924 March 28
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 18 cm)

Goldman writes regarding articles she has sent or is sending for publication. She adds that a literary agent has accomplished nothing for her thus far.

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Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade (n.p.), 1924 May 10
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 14 cm)

Goldman writes that she receives Freedom, "but would like a more personal word" in a letter. She then requests copies of books to be sent to another author.

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Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade (n.p.), 1924 June 12
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman sends a review of a play on the Haymarket riot for possible publication. She addes that her complete book will be published in the Fall. She outlines the attempts made to get her a visa for England. She then notes her sense of gratification that there is growing interest in those imprisoned in Russia.

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Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade (n.p.), 1924 June 28
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 15 cm)

Goldman writes with alterations to the proofs for her review of the Haymarket riot play. She then condemns an article written by Guy Aldred.

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Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Comrade Thomas H. Keell (London, England), 1924 July 16
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 9 cm)

Goldman writes in a postcard that there may be no reply to Aldred's article. She adds that she has obtained a visa from England, and will soon learn the details.

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Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Comrade (n.p.), 1924 September 20
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman writes that the printed announcement in Freedom regarding her arrival will more likely bring out members of Scotland Yard to greet her. She had hoped to avoid publicity. She notes the two people that will meet her, and other arrangements made.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade (n.p.), 1924 October 16
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman writes that she has been kept busy meeting people and that there are plans to hold a dinner for her. She hopes for a formal meeting next week.

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Emma Goldman (no place) to Comrade (n.p.), 1924 October 17
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman writes requesting copies of her Essays, and address for various supporters.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade (n.p.), 1924 October 22
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman writes regarding procuring copies of her Essays, arrangements for the dinner to be held in her honor, and obtaining literature for people she is meeting.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade (n.p.), [1924] October 31
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 14 cm)

Goldman writes regarding obtaining the list of names for mailing announcements of the dinner in her honor, and regarding a meeting.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Comrade (n.p.), 1924 November 9
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 13 cm)

Goldman writes regarding writing paper and envelopes she cannot use because the postage is prohibitive.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade [Thomas H. Keell] (n.p.), 1924 November 19
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman records the writing assignments she has agreed to take and outlines plans for her to deliver a lecture on Russia. She requests names of Freedom subscribers who might contribute to the rental of the venue.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade (n.p.), 1924 November 25
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 26 cm)

Goldman sends a query regarding duties to be paid for publications then requests the subscriber list so that she can send her mailing out.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Comrade (n.p.), 1924 December 3
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 33 cm)

Goldman writes a letter to the subscribers of Freedom, requesting their monetary support for her lectures on Russia. A subscriber has written a note on the letter, requesting clarification as to the writer, since Goldman signed it "E. G. Kershner."

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade (n.p.), 1924 December 5
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 21 cm)

Goldman requests the recipient to attend to the shipment of her Essays, along with a few other details.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1924 December 17
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman writes requesting publications, and provides details regarding the publishing of her book. She notes that the venue for her lecture has changed, after insurance and other costs made the price of Queen's Hall prohibitive.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Thomas H. Keell (Willesden, England), 1924 December 22
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Goldman writes a postcard asking Keell to return a manuscript which she wrote badly. She adds that she cannot pay for copies of Berkman's book because she needs them for publishers.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1924 December 24
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman asks Keell if they have a contact in Paisley, because the Women's Guild there has asked for the date of her lecture. She then outlines her Christmas gifts for his family, and invites them to tea.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Tom [Keell] (Willesden, England), [1924 December 28]
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Goldman requests the name of the publisher of a recent book on Syndicalism. She then discusses the review and advertising for her book in Freedom.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 February 3
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman makes requests for an estimate to produce a magazine and for pamphlets, both on behalf of students with which she has contact.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 February 5
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman writes of the indifference she is facing regarding her tour of England; no anarchists have stepped up to assist. She then asks for background regarding a comrade who has worked in the movement but is now down and out.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 February 8
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman thanks Keell for possible contacts for her tour of England and Scotland, and discusses Glasgow in particular. She then orders sets of pamphlets for her students, and mentions two halls they may get for the tour.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 February 23
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 26 cm)

Goldman expresses shock about the cost Keell must have incurred for a shipment of publications from New York, some of which she did not want. She then discusses possible tour dates, and requests his help firming up the schedule.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), [1925] February 24
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman plans her response to a Socialist report on Russia that appeared in the newspapers, which she hopes to publish in article or pamphlet form. She then points out that their "deportation" pamphlet is sorely out of date and cannot be used. She closes by noting conflicts in her touring schedule.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Tom [Keell] (Willesden, England), 1925 March 3
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Goldman comments on a comrade who has confused his stand on Russia, then orders a rubber stamp.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), [1925 March 13]
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman writes regarding plans for an independent meeting to be held in Northampton, and publications she would like for the meeting. In a postscript, she requests a copy of a paper.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 March 17
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 26 cm)

Goldman reports on her lecture at Northampton. She then outlines changes in her tour dates, and alterations in her needs for publications as a result. She ends the letter by discussing the misreporting of a speech made by a mutual friend.

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Emma Goldman (Treherbert, Wales) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 March 31
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 13 cm)

Goldman requests a copy of her Essays for a reader, then requests information on the "'United Front' of the Moscow gang, and the English Trade Unions" for a speech.

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Emma Goldman (Treherbert, Wales) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 April 2
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Goldman requests a copy of Freedom, so that John Turner may comment on an article she wrote.

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Emma Goldman (no place) to Tom [Keell] (London, England), 1925 April 6
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Goldman thanks Keell for the material she requested, although it is not enough for a lecture. She reports that they have had tussles with Communists, especially those that have been drinking.

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Emma Goldman (no place) to Tom [Keell] (Willesden, England), 1925 April 9
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Goldman requests a copy of the Daily Herald for a pamphlet she is writing , then asks him to confirm the amount of literature ordered for Norwich.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 April 23
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman reports that her latest meeting "was a frost, hardly a hundred people and a spiritless crowd." She points out how painful the process of even bringing people together has been. She then requests books for her own reading, and orders literature for her Manchester meeting.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 April 27
(2 Leaves, 4 pages; 26 cm)

Goldman outlines corrections to be printed in Freedom for their latest pamphlet.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 May 5
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 17 cm)

Goldman asks for 50 copies of their pamphlet, and corrections slips for the 2,800 pamphlets they have printed.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 May 8
(1 Leaves, 1 page: 26 cm)

Goldman asks about a contact for an Edinburgh University student, requests copies of their pamphlet, with more for the newspaper exchanges. She notes Berkman will cover the Russian papers in Berlin.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 May 8
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 26 cm)

Goldman notes that they cannot afford the expense of reproducing their report; printing will be cheaper, and she asks Keell to take over the order for the report and financial statement. She then announces she will have tickets to a piano recital, if Keell and his family wish to attend.

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Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 May 11
(4 Leaves, 5 pages; 26 cm)

Goldman bemoans the fact that they have no one to help with their work "or to really care a damn about it." She then reviews the plan for printing the report and their financial statement and for mailing all of it with their pamphlet. She then goes over orders for the pamphlet that have come from New York, debating their cost, which is to be determined.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 May 14
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 13 cm)

Goldman requests a stamp with publisher Boni Liveright's name so that she can stamp Alexander Berkman's folders.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 May 18
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman requests that pamphlets be mailed to a contact in Washington, D.C., to be put on sale with trade unionists. She then asks how they stand in their accounts. She plans to advertise Berkman's Memoirs and her Essays together. She announces that a discounted version of her volumes on Russia will soon be produced, but she will have to borrow the money to cover her part in the expenses.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 June 16
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 33 cm)

Goldman asks Keell to arrange meetings between Pierre Ramus and Jewish and English comrades. She offers to preside, if that helps attendance. She also asks him to attend a ceremony and to house a friend coming to town.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 June 19
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 17 cm)

Goldman writes that James? Colton plans to visit. She then describes her feelings about an unidentified ceremony and requests a book from Keell.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 July 13
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 33 cm)

Goldman outlines a circular for her lectures on modern drama she wishes Keell to arrange for her. She adds that she wishes Freedom were not so hard pressed, and that she hopes to help through her general propaganda work.

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Emma Goldman (Bristol, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 July 17
(4 Leaves, 7 pages; 20 cm)

Keell has sent a proof for Goldman's requested circular, and she provides corrections. She then states that she is exhausted from her 10 month's work, and she is taking a week off in Bristol. She advises him to write to Alexander Berkman for copies of his book. She closes with a promise to write a future article on the closing of the Russian Solovetsky concentration camp for political prisoners.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 August 11
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 20 cm)

Goldman asks for a missing volume of Mother Earth, then discusses the availability of Berkman's book and a reduced rate for the American edition of her set on Russia. She expresses dismay at the public announcement of her change of names. She closes by mentioning a committee meeting.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 September 1
(1 Leaves, 3 pages; 21 cm)

Goldman enquires about the costs for engraving a card and letterhead for stationary to be used for the drama lectures.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 September 8
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 20 cm)

Goldman orders another 1000 copies of her circular, then checks on the status of her visiting card.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 September 10
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 20 cm)

Goldman includes a new final paragraph for her circular, and asks again about the proof for her visiting card. She mentions a speaking engagement by [Herman?] Sandomirsky.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 September 26
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 33 cm)

Goldman orders several books for her own reading, and asks Keell to find out if publishers will supply books to sell at her meetings, and whether they have published Russian plays. She says that the work done in Bristol has been very encouraging, then outlines other engagements, including a drama lecture on O'Neill. She hopes her work on drama will provide her with a living that will support her work on other ideas and the Russian situation.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 October 7
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 33 cm)

Goldman outlines her debts, particularly in regard to a printer, and worries about how she will pay them.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 October 14
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 23 cm)

Goldman sends payment for a book, then orders other publications. She mentions that she is leaving copies of Myth on her shelves in case Keell has orders for them.

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Emma Goldman (Bristol, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 October 20
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 21 cm)

Goldman requests a correct address for Pierre Ramus. She reports that her recent meeting was well attended, although her drama lecture was not.

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Emma Goldman (Bristol, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 October 26
(6 Leaves, 9 pages; 25 cm)

Goldman writes that there is evidence that the Russians are "trying to break up the last oasis of the anarchists," the Kropotkin Museum. She cautions against publishing the news in Freedom, until there is confirmation. She points out that the Russians have already had success in separating the ranks of anarchist refugees. She then reports low attendance for her drama lectures. She has "lost hope" and feels depressed. In contrast, her recent political meetings have been packed, with responsive and attentive listeners, and she has an additional lecture upcoming. She goes on to outline what literature is selling at her meetings. She worries about plans for a lecture at Keat's house, then offers Keell a complimentary ticket to a lecture. She hopes to soon have money to pay her debts.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 November 11
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 21 cm)

Goldman points out that she has a check to cover her printer's debt. She orders several books for her own use. She writes that she has too many Bulletins, and states "I wish I knew what the Committee could do to arrange a meeting or something, it is awful to know the continued percecution [sic] in Russia and to be unable to help...." She asks Keell if he has any pamphlets containing methods of birth control for an upcoming lecture on the topic. In a postscript, she comments on her 33rd anniversary in the movement.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (Willesden, England), 1925 November 20
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Goldman states that the pamphlet on birth control Keell obtained only describes one method, and wonders what the Margaret Sanger pamphlet does.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 December 4
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 33 cm)

Goldman announces that she is going away for 8-10 weeks, and has material to return to Keell, as well as items to discuss. She adds that Harry Kelly will soon be arriving from the United States, and outlines plans to meet his train and arrange a social for him.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 December 11
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 23 cm)

Goldman sends copy for Freedom and requests some plays. She outlines plans to meet with the Committee so that she can leave things in order before she leaves.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1925 [No date]
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 20 cm)

Goldman asks Keell to obtain the lease for her books and newspaper clippings from Germany. She will send copy to accompany Berkman's book.

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Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 February 14
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman writes that she has been alternately relaxing and working, writing an article on [Johann?} Most and a series of drama lectures on Ibsen. She adds that "I only feel disgusted that we play no part whatever in the awakening of the masses." She cannot arrange for drama lectures, let alone political meetings. Goldman orders more books for her use, then mentions that they should send Berkman's book to Dr. Paolo Flores for translation into Italian, and points to another book of documents compiled by Berkman that should be advertised in Freedom.

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Emma Goldman (Bristol, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 March 11
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman writes that she has been lecturing despite being ill, and has found new rooms, although she plans to return to France to work on a manuscript of Russian plays. She orders more books for her use. She notes that a representative of the publisher has been able to quickly sell copies of Myth; in contrast, she has been able to sell only a few.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 March 28
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 23 cm)

Goldman writes that the first edition of the Myth has sold out and she has enquired about a second edition. She also requests several books in support of her Russian drama lectures. She reports that attendance was low at the last lecture, and she will discontinue them if attendance does not improve.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 April 11
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman announces that she has called for a Committee meeting. She attempts to set up a meeting for Keell and Ben? Reitman.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (London, England), 1926 April 29
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Goldman makes plans for a meeting with Keell.

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Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 May 10
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman plans to fly to Paris now that the General Strike is occurring. She had hoped to have a part in the strike, but was told they had enough help for the present. She gives her addresses, then requests that Keell send her Freedom, along with other publications about the strike.

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Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 May 19
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 31 cm)

Goldman writes about the general strike, and her feeling that it is easy to be critical after the fact. She requests several books for her use, along with a review copy of "Love Letters of an Archivist."

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Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 June 4
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 31 cm)

Goldman writes about the "indifference of those who call themselves comrades," the failure of anarchists to play a leading role in the recent general strike, and the man who killed Petlura. She states she cannot finish "Love Letters of an Archivist," let alone review it.

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Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 June 9
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 31 cm)

Goldman makes note of a comrade who wishes not to be known as an anarchist. She outlines plans for lectures in Canada and requests information.

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Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 June 17
(2 Leaves, 4 pages; 21 cm)

Goldman writes that she has begun work on her Russian drama manuscript, then thanks Keell for obtaining her books, while requesting more. She then discusses plans for her sailing to Canada.

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Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 July 10
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 31 cm)

Goldman writes that she has completed an article on the general strike, and encloses a copy which she would like returned if Keell does not publish it in Freedom. She requests more copies of Cook's pamphlet on the strike, then outlines a planned visit with George Davison. She discusses Freedom's struggle to continue publishing and the general state of the movement in England.

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Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 July 17
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 21 cm)

Goldman orders more books for her own use and requests an invoice for all of her book orders.

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Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 August 3
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 31 cm)

Goldman requests more books, then describes a visit she and Berkman made with George and Joan Davison.

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Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 August 20
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 31 cm)

Goldman writes that she has received the books Keell sent. She comments on the British edition of Berkman's Memoirs, then asks for the latest date she may submit an article to Freedom. She outlines her planned trip to Canada, then worries about the possibility that the trip will fall through. She comments on George Davison's lack of interest in anarchist affairs, despite his former activity.

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Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 August 31
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 31 cm)

Goldman reports that her Canada trip seems more certain, and outlines plans and travel dates. She then orders several books, and comments on Keell's devotion to the cause and printing of Freedom.

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Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 September 11
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman submits her article on Keell's work with Freedom.

Box 1
Folder 4
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 September 16
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman pays her debts and makes a contribution to Freedom, then discusses the articles for the newspaper and her packing for her trip to Canada.

Box 1
Folder 4
Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 September 30
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

Goldman supplies her address in Canada and requests that Keell mail Freedom there. She notes that she does not plan to cross into the United States; anyone who wishes to see her must come to her. She adds some final details about her plans.

Box 1
Folder 4
Emma Goldman (Cherbourg, France) to Tom [Keell] (London, England), 1926 October 7?
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Goldman sends greetings at the beginning of her voyage.

Box 1
Folder 4
Emma Goldman (Montreal, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 October 23
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman states that she has arrived safely, but is uncertain whether she will be permitted to stay, despite assurances to the contrary. An "English meeting" has been arranged for her by the Peoples Forum. She adds that there has been much publicity, but that "her marriage" is what interests people the most. She requests copies of publications be mailed to her.

Box 1
Folder 4
Emma Goldman (Montreal, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 November 25
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 26 cm)

Goldman sends money for Freedom and for copies of the publication. She then reports on her meetings, in which she has not been disappointed, despite their small size.

Box 1
Folder 4
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 November 29
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 25 cm)

Goldman requests copies of the anniversary issue of Freedom, along with other publications.

Box 1
Folder 4
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1926 December 23
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 35 cm)

Goldman settles accounts, then mentions that she was given a surprise party to commemorate her deportation 7 years ago. She used the occasion to raise money for Freedom. She requests other literature. She comments on her marriage, which means no more to her than a visa.

Box 1
Folder 4
E. Colton [Emma Goldman] (Toronto, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1927 January 24
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman updates Keell on the raffle being held for Freedom, then asks him to edit her report for use in Freedom.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman? (Winnipeg, Canada) to H. Lynch (Toronto, Canada), 1927 February 5
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 29 cm)

Goldman refuses Lynch's invitation to debate.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1927 March 26
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman reports that attendance to her lectures in Winnipeg was poor, in contrast to Edmonton, Alberta, where she had great success. She settles her accounts regarding the sale of literature. She outlines plans for more lectures in Toronto, and the possibility of remaining in Canada an additional year. She comments on Sectarianism in the movement and wishes she had more information on China for her lecture. She reports on the raffle that should garner $50 for Freedom. She then orders more literature.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1927 April 9
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 21 cm)

Goldman sends a report for Freedom on her lectures, and asks Keell to especially mention money collected for Russian political prisoners. She then outlines possible plans for remaining in Canada. She reports that she has been unable to sell their pamphlet on the Labour report, and plans to sell them shortly at a steep discount.

Box 1
Folder 5
E. Colton [Emma Goldman] (Toronto, Canada) to Evelyn [Metcalfe?] (n.p.), 1927 April 14
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 36 cm)

Goldman writes a report on her activities in Canada, and adds that she will not be returning to Europe for the foreseeable future. She then discusses where she is able to publish her articles, since she cannot do so in American papers or magazines. She notes she is forced to succeed through lecturing. She reports that there is a plan to raise money to support her in writing her autobiography, but she has no faith in it. She plans to read Elmer Gantry, by Sinclair Lewis.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (London, England), 1927 April 20
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 9 cm)

Goldman revises her total collected on behalf of Russian political prisoners and states that she will be remaining in Canada for the year.

Box 1
Folder 5
E. Colton [Emma Goldman] (Toronto, Canada) to John L. Counsell (Hamilton, Canada), 1927 May 25
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 36 cm)

Goldman writes about Russian imperialism and the success of anarchist and communist movements, particularly in Great Britain. She adds that " After all there were two revolutions in Russia. We have therefore a right to expect a higher ethical conception and a more humane attitude towards human life as we demand of imperialistic and capitalistic countries."

Box 1
Folder 5
E. Colton [Emma Goldman] (Toronto, Canada) to Comrade (n.p.), 1927 May 26
(3 Leaves, 3 pages; 36 cm)

Goldman writes that she is grateful to know that her work has been helpful to these two Chinese comrades, but states that she is too poor to travel to China at this point in time, however much she would like to see the country "in its present great struggle." She describes the theoretical vs. active approaches to Anarchism, and their relationship to Chinese anarchists. She feels that the spiritual, intellectual, and economic awakening in China deserve the support of Anarchists, if only to avoid the dictatorship that has occurred in Russia. She adds that she cannot supply the reading material the writers request, because most of it was confiscated by the authorities in New York. She announces that Berkman is writing a book on Anarchism.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1927 June 26
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman asks why Keell has not written, and encloses $25 raised for the support of Freedom. She loosely outlines her plans for staying and lecturing in Canada, then notes that she is considering writing an autobiography. She is planning on writing her lectures for the summer and requests books.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1927 June 27
(2 Leaves, 3 page; 28 cm)

In response to Keell's statement, Goldman records what little literature has sold, and the payments she has made.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (London, England), 1926 July 31
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

In a postcard, Goldman supplies her new address, then orders more literature for her lectures.

Box 1
Folder 5
[Emma Goldman] (n.p.) to Heywood Broun (New York City), 1927 August 26
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Goldman? expresses her admiration for Broun's courage and writing on the Sacco-Vanzetti case.

Box 1
Folder 5
E. Colton [Emma Goldman] (Toronto, Canada) to Rosa Sacco (Boston, Massachusetts), 1927 September 3
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman admits that she is proud Nic and Vanzetti spoke about her, but she cannot remember an actual meeting with them. She encloses a letter she wrote to them, then requests biographical information to be used in a pamphlet about the two. She reports on a memorial held in Toronto.

Box 1
Folder 5
E. Colton [Emma Goldman] (Toronto, Canada) to Evelyn Scott (Staten Island, N.Y.), 1927 September 3
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 35 cm)

Goldman explains that her time has been taken up by the Sacco and Vanzetti case, and her deep disappointment in the outcome. However, she sees two areas for hope. One is that Sacco and Vanzetti will be heroes, the other that the American intelligentsia came out in defense of the two men.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom Keell (n.p.), 1927 September 14
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman reports that she has been diagnosed with inflammation of the spinal nerves and is being treated with "violet rays,' which is helping. She encloses her letter to Evelyn Scott on the Sacco and Vanzetti case for Keell's use in Freedom. She comments on the Labour Party and the compromises it will have to make when in office, and states that she has lost all faith in the workers.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Tom Keell (n.p.), 1927 September 19
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Goldman asks for pamphlets and copies of Freedom for her lectures and outlines a plan to get them past customs.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom Keell (London, England), 1927 October 15
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Goldman writes in a postcard that the literature she ordered has been arriving safely, although literature sales have been very poor.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom Keell (London, England), 1927 November 11
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 36 cm)

Goldman requests that Keell stop sending literature. Attendance has been so poor at her lectures there is no way to sell literature. She must finish the series to which she is committed, but she is hopeless about its success. She comments on the amnesty in Russia that has come and gone with no hope for the political prisoners, and wonders if she should have stayed in Russia to do her work. In a postscript, she asks Keell if he thinks she would be successful in London lecturing on general topics, rather than just on Russia.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1927 December 27
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 25 cm)

Goldman writes that she has over three hundred pamphlets left over that she cannot possibly sell, along with some books. She plans to give the books as gifts, then approach the Road to Freedom about selling the pamphlets. Her meetings have not been profitable, so she has had to borrow money for her expenses, and at this point does not even have money for a passage to Europe. She admits she is sorry that Freedom will be closing down, and wishes she knew what to suggest.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1928 January 25
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 25 cm)

Goldman describes her final weeks in Canada, as well as how she distributed the literature she had on hand. She outlines her plans for heading back to Europe, then comments on other presenters reaping benefits from the lectures she has done.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Montreal, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1928 February 26
(3 Leaves, 5 pages; 18 cm)

Goldman reports on the end of her stay in Canada and on the final arrangements for the last of the pamphlets in Canada. She requests more books for her use., and on her plans for her autobiography, along with the research needed for it.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1928 March 3
(2 Leaves, 5 pages; 20 cm)

Goldman provides instructions for remaindering publications in Keell's files. She comments on charges made against him by others in the movement, "Anarchism would be a beautiful ideal, if it were not for the anarchists." She then mentions two comrades who have died suddenly. She closes with a discussion of the memoirs she ordered.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom [Keell] (London, England), 1928 March 12
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

In a postcard, Goldman writes about an appeal that Keell has drafted, considering that it should go to America and Canada, along with Europe.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1928 March 15
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman reports that she will make an appeal to a person visiting her on behalf of Freedom.

Box 1
Folder 5
E. G. Colton [Emma Goldman] (Paris?, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1928 April 16
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman writes about a gathering she has convened to which she invites [William C.] Owen and Keell. She also comments on the books she ordered.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1928 May 2
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman wonders if Keell received her last letter. She announces that she is coming to London for a week, and wishes to meet the new team for Freedom.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1928 May 14
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 25 cm)

Goldman orders a copy of Laura Riding's "Anarchism is not Enough." She comments that younger blood is needed to support Freedom via a circulating letter. She then requests payment for any copies of "My Disillusionment" Keell has on hand.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom [Keell] (London, England), 1928 May 23
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 10 cm)

In a postcard, Goldman thanks Keell for the books received and then provides her new address. She asks whether the circulating letter has been sent yet.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1928 July 30
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman requests data for her autobiography.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1928 September 29
(3 Leaves, 4 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman writes about the divisions in the anarchist movement that keep it from growing. She hopes Keell's plan for monthly indoor lectures succeeds. She requests more information for her book and discusses its progress. She then requests he send her another book.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Joseph (n.p.), 1928 October 26
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman discusses the difficulties she faces in writing her book, and requests and extension on a book chapter she promised to write. She adds a brief history of birth control in the United States.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Harry [Kelly?] (n.p.), 1928 October 28
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman writes about the difficulty she has had in getting information for her book regarding specific individuals. She then requests a copy of a book, and notes that Berkman has finished writing his most recent book.

Box 1
Folder 5
[Emma Goldman] (Paris, France) to Mr. Holmes (n.p.), 1929 January 7
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman writes that she and Holmes will never see eye to eye on Russia, because he will accept no proofs for criticism of the regime, and he does not separate the State from Society.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1929 February 3
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman notes progress made on her book, and comments on the closing of Freedom's London office, despite the increasing interest in the newspaper: " I wish I knew whether it is due to our methods of propaganda, or to the general reaction in the world, that there is so little interest in Anarchism." She then outlines her travel plans.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to William C. Owen (Storrington, England), 1929 June 19
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman writes about Owen's health concerns and asks if he would permit her to raise a private subscription for him.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1929 July 26
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 10 cm)

In a postcard, Goldman thanks Keell for sending articles written by William C. Owen, and then recommends others he can approach for information regarding Owen, who has died.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom H. Keell (Near Stroud., England), 1929 November 30
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman writes that she is completely focused on her book, to the exclusion of other matters, including writing an article regarding William C. Owen. She suggests he approach someone else. She then discusses when her manuscript is due and the advance she would like to use to settle her debts with Keell.

Box 1
Folder 5
Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1930 May 14
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman announces that all their plans have been disrupted. Berkman has been deported to Belgium and she has been working for his right to reenter. The rest of the letter concerns an attack made on Keell in Freedom. Goldman thinks personal grievances have no place in the paper, but plans to protest the attack anyway. "I really feel most unhappy over our trouble and the general condition in our ranks, the vindictive]ness, the wrangles, they are sickening."

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1930 May 19
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman writes to arrange a meeting with Keell, [Max?] Nettlau, and [Alexander?] Shapiro. They will possibly discuss a joint protest to Freedom regarding the attack on Keell.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1930 June 10
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 26 cm)

Goldman writes that the protest to Freedom is complete, and is on its way to Rudolf Rocker in London for his signature and forwarding to the paper. She adds that Berkman has returned. She plans to leave for Germany.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Berlin, Germany) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1930 June 29
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman recommends that Keell wait for the August issue to appear before enquiring about their protest. She also advises him to also grive the "new group" access to the Freedom plant, to help end the personal squabbles.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1930 July 27
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman again counsels Keell to wait for the protest to appear, and to settle the matter privately.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1930 December 21
(3 Leaves, 4 pages)

Goldman congratulates Keell on his restrained tone in response to the attack on him. She outlines her work to complete her autobiography, although she must wait a year for it to be published. She hopes to do more for Freedom Press in the coming year.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1931 January 15
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman requests a pamphlet and point of information she requires to complete her book.

Box 1
Folder 6
[Emma Goldman] (St. Tropez, France) to "old Scout" (n.p.), 1931 February 1
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman reports that she has finished her book, and requests that it be given a serious reading. She also reports that Berkman has been granted a stay, with renewals. She adds that she will soon travel to Nice.

Box 1
Folder 6
[Emma Goldman] (Nice, France) to Joseph [Ishill] (n.p.), 1931 February 13
(3 Leaves, 3 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman notes that Alexander Berkman has been permitted to stay in the country and that she has completed her book, although she is suffering with extreme pain in her heels. She recommends sources of information on Voltairine de Cleyre. She comments on the respect that Knopf has shown her autobiography. Finally, she writes that she would like to meet Elie Faure.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Nice, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1931 February 19
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman announces that she has finished her book, but discusses her physical issues. She requests that Keell send a copy of her essays to a Polish group publishing an encyclopedia of Yiddish writers. She then comments on George Davison's death.

Box 1
Folder 6
[Emma Goldman] (Nice, France) to Evelyn [Metcalfe?] (n.p.), 1931 March 10
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman reports on finishing her book, and that doing so has deeply fatigued her. She adds that she is in Nice only temporarily, because of the expense. She then comments on Clifford McCarthy, a recent acquaintance.

Box 1
Folder 6
[Emma Goldman] (St. Tropez, France) to "Good Comrade" (n.p.) [Max Nettlau?], 1931 May 13
(3 Leaves, 3 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman despairs "the difficulty of getting to any understanding by means of letters." Topics include the treatment of Rysanov by Soviet authorities, anarchism as a progressive cause, the lack of stress on preparing individuals and the masses for what comes after the Revolution, her sense that she is useless and unable to be in touch with the masses, the revolution in Spain compared to the Russian revolution, and her inability to attend the Syndicalist Congress in Spain.

Box 1
Folder 6
[Emma Goldman] (St. Tropez, France) to "Friends" [Mark and Johanna], 1931 June 6
(3 Leaves, 3 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman writes of feeling fatigued following the completion of her book, and discusses first paper to do a story on her autobiography and its Yiddish translation, and the final release of the 2-volume set. She comments on the Spanish Republic and reports on Alexander Berkman's activities.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1931 June 12
(4 Leaves, 5 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman writes to ask Keell what books he has loaned her should be returned. She comments on the failure of Knopf's London office, and on George Davison's estate, and her plans to read Max Nettlau's latest book. In a postscript she comments on the Freedom Bulletin, wondering if it still exists.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1931 October 9
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman writes of her travel plans, Alexander Berkman's medical condition, the release of her autobiography, and the puzzle that is her future plans.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1931 December 1
(5 Leaves, 5 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman outlines the possibility of a European speaking tour, then comments on her autobiography -- the British edition, favorable reviews, the high cost of the volumes, and review copies.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1932 October 27
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman writes about the British edition of her autobiography, and her possible plans to come to London

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (The Hague, Netherlands) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1933 January 23
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 26 cm)

Goldman informs Keell of her travel plans for England. She then comments on one of her attackers in the movement and informs Keell of the death of comrade Maria Goldsmith. In a postscript she notes the high price of the British edition of her autobiography, and comments on Rebecca West, an English contact.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1933 March 9
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 26 cm)

Goldman comments on several meetings held in London, and outlines more meetings in the future. She then comments on the Anti War Congress held by the Communists.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (St. Tropez, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1933 September 22
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman outlines her travel plans, with a possible return to England rather than to Canada. She requests his suggestions for reaching the non-Communist members of the Labour movement. She then comments on her failure to make money in other endeavors.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (S.S. Ascania Cunard Line) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1933 December 8
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 25 cm)

Goldman reports that she was kicked out of Holland following her third lecture, and since nothing was planning in England, she is now on her way to Canada. She reports that she has low expectations for the trip, but there is a possibility of a visa for the United States. She requests that Keell send literature for her to sell at her lectures.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) to Evelyn Metcalfe (Saratoga Springs, New York), 1934 April 11
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman discusses her plans to visit Metcalfe, and the failure of her tour in the United States.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Rochester, New York) to Thomas Lavers (Bristol, England), 1934 April 15
(4 Leaves, 4 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman discusses her United States tour and its possible extension, the effect the tour has had upon her, and its mismanagement. She mentions meeting a anarchist from Chicago, Frank Heiner.

Box 1
Folder 6
[Emma Goldman] (Montreal, Canada) to "Comrade" (n.p.), 1934 May 11
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Goldman reports on her tour, the raising of money for Russian political prisoners, and successful publicity and contacts made. She hopes for an extended visa for another trip to the United States.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Toronto?, Canada) to Thomas H. Keell (Stroud, England), 1934 May 24
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman discusses the successes and failures of her tour, then requests that Keell go about purchasing the sheets for Berkman's prison memoir.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Thomas [H.] Keell (Stroud, England), 1934 August 1
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman discusses obtaining discounted copies of Berkman's prison memoirs or purchasing the plates for the work. She then outlines her unsettled plans for touring in Europe, America, or Canada, and the lack of advancement in anarchist ideas. She closes by discussing the death of Erich Muhsam.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1934 September 4
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Goldman requests literature to be sent for sale at her lectures, along with a settling of accounts. She closes by discussing the death of [John?] Turner.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Thomas H. Keell (Stroud, England), 1934 October 6
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman discusses her failure to raise any money, and her hesitancy to purchase the copies of Berkman's memoirs. In addition, she laments the lack of good organizers and writers in the United States. She lists the articles she will soon publish.

Box 1
Folder 6
[Emma Goldman] (Toronto, Canada) to B. Yelensky (Chicago, Illinois), 1934 October 31
(3 Leaves, 3 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman writes that she has been forced to drop the project of republishing Berkman's book in the United States, and that she will stay in Canada until the Spring, trying to earn some money. She then outlines how money should be collected in support of the Spanish Revolution and the role of the intelligentsia in the anarchist movement.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Montreal, Canada) to Thomas H. Keell (Stroud, England), 1934 November 27
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Goldman writes that her tour has not been as successful as the last time she was in Montreal. One reason has been the reactionary stance of the local government, another the glamor of Bolshevik ideas. She writes of her plans for the tour, and a return to America or France in the Spring.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Montreal, Canada) to Joseph Ishill (Berkeley Heights, New Jersey), 1934 November 29
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman writes about her lack of help with her tour, her work with anarchist youth, and the backwardness in ideas in Canada. She comments on Ishill's work on William Morris and Votairine de Clayre. She hopes to visit Ishill during an American tour.

Box 1
Folder 6
[Emma Goldman, Montreal, Canada] to Jeanne Levey (Chicago, Illinois), 1934 December 10
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman discusses her apartment, her plans for a 10-lecture tour, the assistance she is receiving, and how she must fight Communist and Fascist ideas. In a postscript she discusses her articles in Harpers.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (Montreal, Canada) to Tom Keell (Stroud, England), 1934 December 19
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Goldman notes that she has returned pamphlets rather than have them confiscated. She comments on London Freedom, and the death of a mutual comrade, "Charles."

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Comrade, [1934?]
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman compares Marinus van der Lubbe's association with the Reichstag fire and Alexander Berkman's Frick assassination attempt. She then discusses Anarcho-Syndicalist theory. She comments on growing anti-war feeling among the youth. Page 2 of the letter is missing.

Box 1
Folder 6
Emma Goldman (S.S. Ascania Cunard Line) to Thomas H. Keell (Stroud, England), 1935 May 14
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 16 cm)

Goldman briefly outlines her plans once she returns to France.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (Paris, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1935 October 27
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman comments about the postponement of her lectures in England, along with plans for copies to be produced of the Berkman memoir.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (London, England) to Thomas H. Keell (Stroud, England), 1935 November 16
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 9 cm)

In a postcard, Goldman requests some bound copies of Berkman's memoirs to place on sale at her lectures.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1935 November 23
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 25 cm)

Goldman objects to the "commercial tone" of Keell's recent letter, noting that she will settle the account for the copies of Berkman's memoirs.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (London, England) to Thomas H. Keell (Stroud, England), 1935 December 19
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Goldman comments on the difficulty of finding a publisher for a German work Berkman has been translating.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (London?, England) to Harry [Kelly?] (n.p.), 1936 January 2
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 25 cm)

Goldman writes that Berkman has celebrated his sixty-fifth birthday. She requests that Harry send the money owed Berkman, commenting on their poverty and difficulty in raising money. She is more positive that this lecture tour will yield positive results, and especially excited to speak with the youth at the National Labor Colleges in South Wales. She desires most of all to gain ground for the anarchist movement in England.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1936 January 9
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 25 cm)

Goldman comments on possible work for Berkman, her general busyness, the literature for her lectures, and completed payment for the Berkman memoirs.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (London?, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1936 February 6
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 25 cm)

Goldman writes that her current lecture tour has failed, but she has plans for more lectures in the Fall. She requests more literature, then comments on the cost of shipping the Berkman memoir to the United States and Canada.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1936 March 1
(3 Leaves, 3 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman comments on the progress of her work in Plymouth and her upcoming lectures, for which she requests some literature. She then reports that Berkman has been hospitalized and therefore she wants to make a profit, if possible, on the sale of his memoir.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1936 March 9
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman writes about her schedule for lectures, then comments on a contact for the Labor Colleges in London. She describes how she almost succumbed to carbon monoxide poisoning.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1936 March 11
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Goldman requests literature written by her for her lectures.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (London, England) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1936 April 2
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman writes of the success of her recent lectures. She adds that Alexander Berkman has undergone a second surgery and is recovering. She will return to France as soon as possible, but adds that with the possibility of war it is "downright stupid to make plans."

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (n.p.) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1936 April 3?
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 20 cm)

Goldman settles her accounts, and asks if Alexander Berkman is due any more money for his memoirs. She plans to leave for France immediately and asks Keell about their contact for the Labor Colleges in London.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (Nice, France) to Thomas H. Keell (Stroud, England), 1936 April 8
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 10 cm)

In a postcard, Goldman reports on Alexander Berkman's condition.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (Nice, France) to Thomas H. Keell (Stroud, England), 1936 April 1
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 10 cm)

In a postcard, Goldman provides an update on Alexander Berkman's improved condition.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (Nice, France) to Thomas H. Keell (Stroud, England), 1936 April 21?
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 10 cm)

In a postcard, Goldman discusses money due for Alexander Berkman's memoir, then provides an update on Berkman's condition.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (Nice, France) to E. C. Carbo, 1936 May 1
(4 Leaves, 4 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman answers a questionnaire regarding Anarchist principles, sent for Alexander Berkman. She writes about Anarchist participation in elections, power during the revolutionary transition period, solidarity with the workers, and various situations in Spain.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (Nice, France) to Tom [Keell] (n.p), 1936 May 12
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 27 cm)

Goldman provides an update on Alexander Berkman's condition, and the condition of Emmy, Berkman's girlfriend. She comments on her recent letter to the comrades in Spain and the disappearance of Erich Muhsam's widow, then outlines the current plans for her next speaking tour in England.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (Nice, France) to Thomas H. Keell (Stroud, England), 1936 June 30
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 10 cm)

In a postcard, Goldman announces Alexander Berkman's death, and her plans to return to St. Tropez.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (London, England) to Harry [Kelly?] (n.p.), 1937 June 7
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman writes that her work with Spain is finished, but she worries about events there, because she can get no direct word from participants.She argues that she may have to drop her membership in the CNT-FAI. She comments on a possible visa for the United States, then on Errico Malatesta's activities in Spain.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (Marseille, France) to T. H. Keell (Stroud, England), 1937 September 14
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 9 cm)

Goldman writes that she is en route to Barcelona and "it means going into the cage of mad days."

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (London, England) to "Dear friend", 1938 February 10
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 25 cm)

In an open letter, Goldman announces an opening of an English office for the International Anti-Fascist Solidarity (S.I.A.), and its plans to support refugees in Catalonia.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (London, England) to Harry [Kelly?] (n.p.), 1938 April 28
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman writes about her ill-fated attempts to raise money for her comrades in Spain, and the general indifference to the plight of people there. She contrasts this with the emotional letters she receives from Spain, which inspire her to keep working. She reports on plans to develop a committee to work on obtaining a visa for her to visit the United States, although she plans to go to Canada.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to C.V. (n.p.), 1939 May 30
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman charges her rejuvenated spirit to her work in Spain. She discusses the reproduction of clippings and writing a message for the comrades in the West.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Harry Kelly (New Rochelle, New York), 1939 May 31
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 8 cm)

In a postcard, Goldman mentions a wire she sent that has gone awry, and being remembered by her friends. She also requests the loan of books.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Harry [Kelly?] (n.p.), 1939 June 14
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman notes the potential for some lectures in Winnipeg. She comments on the help of a good friend, Harry's unemployment, and that they have been compelled to act on their ideas, whether successful or not. She also comments on the "Stalin criminals" and their activities in Spain and France.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada) to Harry [Kelly?] (n.p.), 1939 July 9
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Goldman outlines the various ways she has been celebrating her 70th birthday, and of her plans to celebrate the 50th anniversary of pledging herself to anarchism.

Box 1
Folder 7
[Emma Goldman] to unknown, 1938?
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Page 2 of unidentified letter. Goldman discusses efforts to support the transportation of Spanish comrades to Mexico, and comments on working with Communists and on [Juan?] Negrin.

Box 1
Folder 7
Emma Goldman (n.p.) to J. B. Moore (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), undated
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 14 cm)

In a copy of a telegram, Goldman writes that a Jewish meeting may not be announced before an English meeting.

Box 1
Folder 7
Maurice A. Hanline (n.p.) to Emma Goldman, 1929 June 5
(1 Leaves, 1 page (2 copies); 27 cm)

Hanline, who was vice president at publishing firm Horace LIveright, praises Goldman's autobiography, stating that he has instructed that an advance be offered for the work.

Box 1
Folder 8
Thomas H. Keell (London, England) to Emma Goldman (n.p.), 1927 July 15
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 25 cm)

Keell provides a statement of accounts and payments made, and notes an outstanding balance.

Box 1
Folder 9
C. Edwards (London?, England) to "Dear Comrade", 1938 January 26
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 25 cm)

Edwards sent this letter on behalf of the Emma Goldman Lecture Committee, to solicit funds in support of public meetings to be held by Emma Goldman in London.

Box 1
Folder 10
Harry Kelly (New Rochelle, New York) to Emma Goldman (n.p.), 1939 June 3
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Kelly mentions that he received and read aloud her wire. He outlines possible books for Goldman to read.

Box 1
Folder 10
Ma[nnie?] (?, Conn.?) to Harry [Kelly] (n.p.), 1939 July 22
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Ma[nnie] discusses dinners to be held in honor of Emma Goldman's 50th anniversary as an anarchist. He prefers the dinners be held with her present. He would prefer to work for a dinner for Leonard [?].

Box 1
Folder 10
H. Lynch (Toronto, Canada) to Emma Goldman (Toronto, Canada), 1927 January 25
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Lynch writes regarding arrangements for a debate between Goldman and Mr. Silver, a representative of the Socialist Labor Party.

Box 1
Folder 11
A. [Alexander M.] Shapiro (Stockholm, Sweden) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1922 January 9
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 28 cm)

Shapiro writes that his address in Moscow is blockaded, regarding misinformation about Russia in the press, including the fate of Russian political prisoners, especially those on hunger strikes. He plans to return to Russia if permitted to do so. In the meantime he wishes to catch up on the anarchist international movement and orders copies of Freedom from Keell.

Box 1
Folder 12
A. [Alexander M.] Shapiro (Stockholm, Sweden) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1922 January 24
(2 Leaves, 3 pages; 28 cm)

Shapiro writes about ten anarchists shot in Russia and the various press coverage he will send to Keell. He also writes how he came to be in Sweden.

Box 1
Folder 12
Sophie Kropotkin (Paris, France) to Miss Addams (n.p.), 1925 January 25
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 25 cm)

Kropotkin asks Addams to form a Peter Kropotkin Memorial Committee in the United States.

Box 1
Folder 13
Antoinette F. Konikow (Boston, Massachusetts) to Comrade Swabeck (n.p.), 1926 August 24
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 23 cm)

Konikow writes to invite a speaker to Boston and comments on an "infernal plot" having to do with resolutions being considered.

Box 1
Folder 13
John G. Wright (n.p.) to Comrade Swabeck (n.p.), 1930 June 18
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 23 cm)

Wright urges immediate action in response to Stalinist transgressions.

Box 1
Folder 13
Antoinette F. Konikow (Boston, Massachusetts) to Comrade Swabeck (n.p.), 1936 August 18
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 23 cm)

Konikow makes a contribution to a monetary fund, and urges a meeting to protest "the infamous frame-up of Stalin," with coverage in the press, especially The Nation.

Box 1
Folder 13
Antoinette F. Konikow (Boston, Massachusetts) to Comrade Swabeck (n.p.), 1936 August 19
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 23 cm)

Konikow makes a contribution to a fund, and seeks to arrange a meeting with Comrade Shachtman regarding the frame-up of Stalin.

Box 1
Folder 13
No name (n.p.) to Antoinette F. Konikow (Boston, Massachusetts), 1936 August 22
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Unidentified writer, perhaps Comrade Swabeck?, writes about the frame-up of Stalin, the planned statements regarding events, planning for the meeting with Shachtman, and publication of articles.

Box 1
Folder 13
Antoinette F. Konikow (Boston, Massachusetts) to Comrade Swabeck (n.p.), 1936 November 19
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 23 cm)

Konikow writes regarding a speaker for a Spanish meeting, adding that the Communist Party is organizing its own large meeting beforehand.

Box 1
Folder 13
No name (n.p.) to Comrade Konikow (n.p.), 1936 November 27
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Unidentified writer, perhaps Comrade Swabeck?, writes about possible speakers for Konikow's meeting on Spain.

Box 1
Folder 13
Antoinette F. Konikow (Boston, Massachusetts) to Comrade Swabeck (n.p.), 1936 November 30
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 23 cm)

Konikow writes of the speakers she will contact for her meeting, then questions their endorsement of a publication.

Box 1
Folder 13
Willy Winnick (n.p.) to Anne (n.p.), 1937
(3 Leaves, 6 pages; 28 cm)

Winnick describes in detail local meetings planned and held, and the dispute over the federated labor party resolution.

Box 1
Folder 13
Antoinette F. Konikow (n.p.) to Comrade Swabeck (n.p.), 1937 January 20
(1 Leaves, 3 pages; 22 cm)

Konikow writes requesting clarification regarding a resolution on a federated labor party passed by a local Labor Party Caucus.

Box 1
Folder 13
Willy Winnick (n.p.) to Anne (n.p.), 1937 January 21
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

Winnick writes in detail about the disagreement regarding the resolution on a federated labor party, and requests a response.

Box 1
Folder 13
No name (n.p.) to [Willy] Winnick (n.p.), 1937 January 22
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 28 cm)

The unidentified author discusses the struggle against the centrist Zamites and suggests there should be flexibility regarding the federated labor party question.

Box 1
Folder 13
Irving S. Abrams, Emma Goldman Memorial Committee (Chicago, Illinois) to Comrade, 1941 February 4
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Abrams writes to solicit funds for Goldman's funeral expenses, cemetery lot, monument, and caretaking for the grave.

Box 1
Folder 13
M. E. Fitzgerald, Mother Earth Publishing Association (New York, New York) to Freedom Press (London, England), 1914 August 5
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Fitzgerald writes regarding subscription fulfillment and ordering issues.She mentions the hunger strike of Rebecca Edelsohn, who protested against the United States becoming involved in a war with Mexico.

Box 1
Folder 14
Mother Earth Publishing Association (New York, New York) to Freedom Press (London, England), 1915 January 22
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

An unidentified employee orders some books, then comments on the problem of selling books: "Because all the stupid men of Europe are busy killing each other that is no reason why the intelligent men shouldn't be reading." There is an update regarding Alexander Berkman's activities and a comment on Kropotkin's stance on the war.

Box 1
Folder 14
Bert G. Plattin to the editor of The Communist (n.p.), [1922] February 2
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 25 cm)

Plattin questions why the paper has been silent regarding the "vendetta of the ruling class in Russia against our comrades the Anarchists & Syndicalists."

Box 1
Folder 14
R. W. Postgate, The Communist (London, England) to Messrs. Platten Randolph, Robert & Konna, The Cooperative Land & Crafts Guild (Holt, England), 1922 February 8
(2 Leaves, 2 pages; 26 cm)

Postgate writes that he imagines the letters refer to the expulsion of Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman from Russia. He argues that the two were supported by the Russian government, and in return only attacked the government as "bitterly as they could." The government asked them to move on. He adds "I think you should remember that the present Government in Russia is a dictatorship of the proletariat."

Box 1
Folder 14
Edward Shortt (n.p.) to Colonel J. C. Wedgwood, M. P. (n.p.), 1922 February 24
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 24 cm)

Home Secretary Shortt writes that Max Eastman has sailed from New York and should be refused entry to the country.

Box 1
Folder 14
Li-Pei-Kan (Shanghai, China) to Dear Comrade [Emma Goldman] (n.p.), 1925 September 20
(3 Leaves, 5 pages; 22 cm)

Kan writes of conditions in China, the labor movements and activities of the imperialists and the Communist Party, along with his own work at writing anarchist articles and translations.

Box 1
Folder 14
Li-Pei-Kan (Shanghai, China) to Dear Comrade [Emma Goldman] (n.p.), 1925 October 31
(3 Leaves, 3 pages; 22 cm)

Kan discusses the civil war in China and the activities of Communists. He requests literature from Freedom Press.

Box 1
Folder 14
[Illegible] Newman (London, England) to Tom Keell (n.p.), 1928 March 7
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 20 cm)

Newman discusses discovering what happened at a meeting [s]he missed, and borrowed books.

Box 1
Folder 14
Unidentified to Albert E. Arent, 1934 February 16
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

The unidentified writer writes regarding arrangements for Emma Goldman to speak at Cornell.

Box 1
Folder 14
Edward H. Zabuskie to Emma Goldman, 1934 February 18
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 28 cm)

Zabuskie writes to invite Emma Goldman to speak at Dana College, if her schedule permits.

Box 1
Folder 14
Helen Hau[nam] Joseph to Emma Goldman, 1934 February 27
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 27 cm)

Joseph offers any help she can provide for Goldman's visit to Cleveland, then invites Goldman to dine with her at her home.

Box 1
Folder 14
[Kochaks?] (Bordighera, Italy) to Tom [Keell] (n.p.), 1934 December 28
(1 Leaves, 2 pages; 21 cm)

[Kochaks] thanks Keell for his comments on a book he has written, then describes his return to living in a village in Italy.

Box 1
Folder 14
Unidentified (n.p.) to Emma Goldman (New York, New York), 1910 June 25
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 26 cm)

The writer purchases a subscription for Goldman's book.

Box 1
Folder 14
"One who does not approve" to whom it may concern, undated
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 25 cm)

On the back of a flyer for the event, the writer disapproves of Emma Goldman's speaking about her autobiography in Philadelphia, and expresses surprise at the list of "respected" citizens noted as sponsors.

Box 1
Folder 14
R.A.P [Preston] to Mr. [Alfred A.] Knopf, undated
(1 Leaves, 1 page; 14 cm)

Preston provides a favorable internal reader's report for Goldman's autobiography.

Box 1
Folder 14
Unidentified (n.p.) to editor of L'Adunata dei refrattari (n.p.), undated
(3 Leaves, 3 pages; 23 cm)

Handwritten letter to the editor or article for this New York City newspaper, regarding stipulations the State Department has placed on Emma Goldman's reentry into the country.

Box 1
Folder 14

2. Papers, 1916-1940 and undated

The Papers Series includes materials related to various prominent anarchists in addition to Emma Goldman. There are typescript drafts of four articles and letters by anarchists; nine handwritten articles on anarchist themes written in Italian by Errico Malatesta; publications; press releases for Emma Goldman; ephemera, including tickets, brochures, solicitation letters, handbills and flyers; a contract and room layout for speaking engagements by Goldman; Thomas H. Keell's list of works on anarchism; newspaper clippings related to Goldman; and six black-and-white photographs, including one portrait and two group photographs featuring Goldman, one of Alexander Berkman and his girlfriend, one of Harry Kelly, as well as an unidentified subject.

Typescript articles and letters, 1922, 1928

Includes four typescript articles and letters, often with annotations or corrections, signed by the authors, including Alexander Berkman, Emma Goldman, and [Alexander?] Shapiro. Topics include persecution and prisons in Russia and discussion of anarchist theory.

Box 2
Folder 1
Errico Malatesta handwritten articles, 1929 and undated

Includes six articles by Malatesta, written on various anarchist topics.

Box 2
Folder 2
Errico Malatesta handwritten articles, undated

Includes three articles by Malatesta, written in Italian on various anarchist topics.

Box 2
Folder 3
Publications, 1930, 1940

Includes two publications: one related to Alexander Berkman's 60th birthday celebration held at the Central Opera House in New York City (1930); the other to the Modern School of Stelton Twenty-fifth Anniversary (1940).

Box 2
Folder 4
Press releases, 1934 and undated

Includes eighteen press releases for Emma Goldman. Some are master copies; the majority probably date to the 1930s.

Box 2
Folder 5
Ephemera, 1924-1937 and undated

Includes invitations, tickets, flyers, and handbills, mostly related to speaking engagements or dinners for Emma Goldman. There is also a subscription list form for a book by Alexander Berkman. One flyer is written in Hebrew or Yiddish.

Box 2
Folder 6
Speaking engagement documents, 1934 and undated

Inlcudes a 1934 speaking engagement contract for Emmma Goldman, as well as an undated seating chart for a venue.

Box 2
Folder 7
Keell's typescript list of works on anarchism, undated

Includes a one-page, annotated list of anarchist works probably maintained by Thomas Keell.

Box 2
Folder 8
Newspaper clippings (originals), 1916-1936 and undated

Includes 29 articles and letters to the editor, almost entirely from papers in London.

Box 2
Folder 9
Newspaper clippings (photocopies), 1916-1936 and undated

Includes photocopies of the original 29 articles and letters to the editor, almost entirely from papers in London.

Box 2
Folder 10
Photographs, 1930s and undated

Includes six gelatin silver and albumen photographs. There is one portrait of Emma Goldman and two group photographs that feature her, a photograph of Harry Kelly, and a photograph of Alexander Berkman and his girlfriend Emmy Eckstein. The final photograph is of an unidentified man.

Box 2
Folder 11
 

Historical Note

Emma Goldman was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing, and speeches. She played a pivotal role in the development of anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the 20th century. Born in Kovno, Russian Empire (present-day Kaunas, Lithuania) to a Jewish family, Goldman emigrated to the United States in 1885. Attracted to anarchism after the Haymarket affair, Goldman became a writer and a renowned lecturer on anarchist philosophy, women's rights, and social issues, attracting crowds of thousands. She and anarchist writer Alexander Berkman, her lover and lifelong friend, planned to assassinate industrialist and financier Henry Clay Frick as an act of propaganda of the deed. Frick survived the attempt on his life in 1892 and Berkman was sentenced to 22 years in prison. Goldman was imprisoned several times in the years that followed, for "inciting to riot" and illegally distributing information about birth control. In 1906, Goldman founded the anarchist journal Mother Earth. In 1917, Goldman and Berkman were sentenced to two years in jail for conspiring to "induce persons not to register" for the newly instated draft. After their release from prison, they were arrested—along with hundreds of others—and deported to Russia. Initially supportive of that country's October Revolution which brought the Bolsheviks to power, Goldman reversed her opinion in the wake of the Kronstadt rebellion and denounced the Soviet Union for its violent repression of independent voices. In 1923, she published a book about her experiences, My Disillusionment in Russia. While living in England, Canada, and France, she wrote an autobiography called Living My Life. After the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, she traveled to Spain to support the anarchist revolution there. She died in Toronto on May 14, 1940, aged 70.


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Provenance

The Emma Goldman Papers were received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a gift in 2015.

Processing Information

Processed by Alice Poffinberger, December 2016

Accessions described in this collection guide: 2015-0050-LUBMSS536, 2015-0050-LUBMSS523, 2015-0050-LUBMSS222, 2015-0050-LUBMSS223, 2015-0050-LUBMSS224, 2015-0050-LUBMSS225, 2015-0050-LUBMSS226, 2015-0050-LUBMSS227, 2015-0050-LUBMSS228, 2015-0050-LUBMSS229, 2015-0050-LUBMSS230, 2015-0050-LUBMSS231, 2015-0050-LUBMSS232, 2015-0050-LUBMSS064, 2015-0050-LUBMSS171, 2015-0050-LUBMSS172