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John Hendricks Kinyoun papers, 1851-1898

Summary

Chiefly consists of correspondence of John Hendricks Kinyoun (1825-1903), physician and surgeon in the Confederate Army. Correspondence between Kinyoun and his wife, Elizabeth A. (Conrad) Kinyoun, during the Civil War discusses camp life; the health of the troops; supplies; his work in Winder Hospital, Richmond, Virginia; troop movements and military engagements, especially of the 28th North Carolina Volunteers and the 66th North Carolina Infantry; the Siege of Petersburg; and his views on the Confederacy and its cause. The earliest letter, 1851, from Kinyoun while a student in college, describes a meeting of the American Colonization Society. There are also letters written to the Kinyouns after they moved to Missouri; and a folder of writings which includes a political speech, 1896, by Kinyoun criticizing the Cleveland administration and espousing the free silver doctrine.

Collection Details

Collection Number
RL.11600
Title
John Hendricks Kinyoun papers
Date
1851-1898
Creator
Kinyoun, John Hendricks, 1825-
Extent
.5 Linear Feet, 1 box
Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Language
Materials in English

Collection Overview

Personal correspondence of John Hendricks Kinyoun (1825-1903), physician and surgeon in the Confederate Army. Correspondence between Kinyoun and his wife, Elizabeth A. (Conrad) Kinyoun, during the Civil War discusses camp life; the health of the troops; supplies and food; his work as a surgeon for Winder Hospital, Richmond, Virginia; troop movements and military engagements, especially of the 28th North Carolina Volunteers and the 66th North Carolina Infantry; the Siege of Petersburg; and his views on the Confederacy and its cause. The earliest letter, 1851, from Kinyoun while a student in college, describes a meeting of the American Colonization Society.

Also included are postwar letters written to the Kinyouns after they moved to Missouri; and a folder of writings which include a political speech, 1896, by Kinyoun criticizing the Cleveland administration and espousing the free silver doctrine.

More Biographical / Historical Info

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More copyright and citation information

How to Cite

[Identification of item], John Hendricks Kinyoun papers, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Contents of the Collection

Historical Note

John Hendricks Kinyoun was a physician, farmer, and Confederate surgeon during the Civil War. Born October 4, 1825 in Rowan (now Davie) County, Missouri, he attended Wake Forest University, North Carolina for one year, then transferred to Columbian College, Washington, DC, then entered Union College in New York. In 1856, he married Elizabeth (Bettie) A. Conrad of Forsyth County, North Carolina (d. 1872). While teaching in N.C., Kinyoun attended law school for a time, then began his medical training with Dr. Valentine Mott, surgeon at University of the City of New York, graduating from the University in medicine in 1859. In 1861, he entered the Confederate service as a captain, and participated in many battles. He was then appointed surgeon for the duration of the war. After the war, Dr. Kinyoun returned to North Carolina, where he took up farming as well as a medical practice. He and his family then moved to the village of Centerview, Missouri. He remarried in 1879 to Martha Hammonds. Kinyoun passed away in Missouri on July 27, 1903.


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Provenance

The John Hendricks Kinyoun papers were received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a gift in 1969.

Processing Information

Processed by Rubenstein Library staff.

Encoded by Paula Jeannet, February 2018.

Accession(s) described in this finding aid: 69-85.