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Guide to the John R. Gregg Papers, 1947-2009

Summary

John R. Gregg, former professor of zoology, was born December 16, 1916. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Alabama, and then completed a Ph.D. in biology at Princeton in 1946. For a decade, he served on the faculty at Columbia University before coming to Duke in 1957. He stayed at Duke until his retirement in 1986. Gregg was also a skilled longbow archer and his papers contain some information about archery. In 2009, he died at the age of 92. The John Gregg Papers contain mostly information about Dr. Gregg's research and work including materials related to the courses he taught. His interest in archery is also reflected. The collection also contains significant correspondence between Gregg and J.H. Woodger, an influential 20th century British theoretical biologist and philosopher of biology.

Collection Details

Record Group
UA.29.02.0251
Title
John R. Gregg papers
Extent
4 Linear Feet
Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Language
Materials in English

Collection Overview

The collection contains the academic and personal papers of John R. Gregg, Professor Emeritus of Zoology at Duke University. The collection includes correspondence between Gregg and leading biologists such as Joseph Henry Woodger and Arstrid Lindenmayer and notes and drafts of Gregg's many publications, research notes on a variety of subjects in Biology and Zoology, and materials related to lectures given by Gregg. The collection also reflects Gregg's experiences as a professor of Zoology at Duke University with lecture notes and class materials relating to classes he taught. Materials also include personal papers relating to Gregg's passionate interest in archery, including blueprints and designs of archery equipment created by Gregg.

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Access to Collection

Collection is open for research.

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Copyright for official university records is held by Duke University; all other copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

More copyright and citation information

How to Cite

[Identification of item], in the John R. Gregg Papers, Duke University Archives, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Contents of the Collection

1. Research, 1947-2009

The Research series contains notes, publications and other materials that Gregg collected and employed during his research in Zoology. The Publications subseries deals with materials related to publications authored by Gregg during his career, including his 1954 book, The Language of Taxonomy. Also included are book reviews of other publications published by Gregg. Materials in this subseries are organized alphabetically by title. Materials include drafts of the publications containing edits and annotations, source lists and notes that Gregg took while preparing the publications. Also included are Gregg's notes relating to an unfinished manuscript from 1963 on developmental energetics. The Research Notes subseries contains materials related to different research subjects, organized alphabetically by title as well as several bound notebook containing notes by Gregg. The Lectures subseries contains materials related to lecture talks given by Gregg during his career, including his 1958 lecture in Europe.

Abstract Machines
Box 1
Folder 1
Analytical Natural Deduction, 1967-
Box 1
Folder 2
Axiomatic Quasi-Natural Deduction, 1968
Box 1
Folder 3
Buck and Hull : A Critical Rejoiner, 1968
Box 1
Folder 4
A Calculus of Individuals, 1966
Box 1
Folder 5
A Calculus of Q-Individuals, 1968
Box 1
Folder 6
Cytogenetics, 1943
Box 1
Folder 7
Developmental Energetics (Unfinished Manuscript), 1963
Box 1
Folder 8
Developmental Systems, 1961
Box 1
Folder 9
Explication: The Concept of Cell
Box 1
Folder 10
Finite Linnean Systems, 1966
Box 1
Folder 11
The Language of Taxonomy, 1950
Box 1
Folder 12
A New Version of Quantification Theory, 1968
Box 1
Folder 13
On Natural Deduction, 1968
Box 1
Folder 14
[Book Reviews]
Box 1
Folder 15
On Deciding Whether Protisans are Cells
Box 1
Folder 16
A Technique for Natural Deduction, 1965
Box 1
Folder 17
Two Modes of Deductive Interference, 1969
Box 1
Folder 18
Haxbu: a begins u, x is environment of u and b ends u, 1965
Box 1
Folder 19
LE(2); u (X,13) combined
Box 1
Folder 20
Reduction To Valid Sequences, 1971
Box 1
Folder 21
Singulatory Genetical Systems
Box 1
Folder 22
Protazoa and Cells
Box 1
Folder 23
The System (E(F G I)1)
Box 1
Folder 24
The System (F G I)1
Box 1
Folder 25
The System (F G I)2
Box 1
Folder 26
Taxonomic Systems with a Finite Number of Ranks, 1966
Box 1
Folder 27
The Theory of LE (2)
Box 1
Folder 28
Theory of µ(?,?)
Box 1
Folder 29
Theorums P, T
Box 1
Folder 30
XE, 1961
Box 1
Folder 31
D, F, G, E, 1959
Box 1
Folder 32
Misc Notes
Box 1
Folder 33
[Blue Binder Notes]
Box 1
Folder 34
General Reading, 1958
Box 1
Folder 35
[Black Binder Notes]
Box 2
Folder 1
[Notebook 1]
Box 2
Folder 2
[Notebook 2]
Box 2
Folder 3
[Notebook 3]
Box 2
Folder 4
[Notebook 4]
Box 2
Folder 5
[Notebook 5]
Box 2
Folder 6
Visit to Tankhurst, 1958
Box 2
Folder 7
Studies in the Topic of Evolutionary Genetics: Talk given at Gainesville
Box 2
Folder 8
Talk, Raleigh, 1962
Box 2
Folder 9

2. Class Lecture Notes, 1947-2009

The Class Lecture Notes series contains materials Gregg used for teaching in the Zoology department at Duke University. Materials include lesson notes, tests and source lists related to individual classes taught by Gregg, as well as notes and sources Gregg compiled to teach general topics in Zoology such as regeneration and nuclear differentiation.

Nuclear Differentiation, 1977-1983
Box 2
Folder 10
Regeneration, 1955-1983
Box 2
Folder 11
Energies of Development, 1 of 2
Box 2
Folder 12
Energies of Development, 2 of 2
Box 2
Folder 13
Zoology I
Box 2
Folder 14
Zoology 92: Laboratory Record + Instructions
Box 2
Folder 15
Zoology 196s.58, 1983
Box 2
Folder 16
Zoology 205, 1969
Box 2
Folder 17
Zoology 229:Axiation
Box 2
Folder 18
Lectures to Zoology 271: Cell Physiology, 1971
Box 3
Folder 1
Zoology 229: Gametogenisis, Fertilization
Box 3
Folder 2
Zoology 205
Box 3
Folder 3
Zoology 295, 1 of 2
Box 3
Folder 4
Zoology 295 2 of 2
Box 3
Folder 5
Lectures Biology 14.6, 1979
Box 3
Folder 6

3. Archery, 1947-2009

The Archery series includes materials related to Gregg's hobby of archery and contains correspondence between Gregg and manufacturers of archery equipment, designs of archery equipment created by Gregg and his 1982 manuscript, Elements of Longbow Design. This series also contains notes on Gregg's efforts to donate the archery collection of his friend Russell G. Wilcox to the Smithsonian Institution.

Dwight G. Gorrell
Box 3
Folder 7
Al Herrin
Box 3
Folder 8
Robert S. John
Box 3
Folder 9
Val Rawnsley
Box 3
Folder 10
Earl L. Ullrich
Box 3
Folder 11
Russell G. Wilcox
Box 3
Folder 12
Wilcox Estate
Box 3
Folder 13
O. M. Wilsey
Box 3
Folder 14
Archery Photographs
Box 3
Folder 15
Actual Designs, 1 of 2
Box 3
Folder 16
Actual Designs, 2 of 2
Box 3
Folder 17
Bow Weight, Arrow Deflection and Arrow Length
Box 3
Folder 18
Braced Bow Curvatures
Box 3
Folder 19
Cherokee D
Box 3
Folder 20
D-Bow Curvature Variation
Box 3
Folder 21
Elements of Longbow Design, 1982
Box 3
Folder 22
Notes and Designs
Box 3
Folder 23
Power Law Limb Curvature
Box 3
Folder 24
[Misc Archery Notes]
Box 3
Folder 25
Flat Iron
Box 3
Folder 26

4. Correspondence, 1947-2009

The Correspondence series contains letters and postcards written to and from Gregg. The subseries J.H. Woodger contains correspondence related to the professional collaboration and personal friendship between Gregg and the British biological philosopher Joseph Henry Woodger beginning in 1954 and ending with Woodger's death in 1974. Many of the materials reflect the development of the axiomatic theory including Woodger's comments on Gregg's work and ideals and copies of notes and lectures sent to Gregg by Woodger. The correspondence also includes materials related to a trip by Woodger to the United States and his visit to Gregg in Durham. Folders within this subseries are organized chronologically. The general correspondence subseries contains other letters received by Gregg including his correspondence with Hungarian biologist Aristid Lindenmayer, the developer of the Lindenmayer system and other correspondence received by Gregg during his career.

Woodger Correspondence, 1954-1955
Box 4
Folder 1
Woodger Correspondence, 1958
Box 4
Folder 2
Woodger Correspondence, 1959
Box 4
Folder 3
Woodger Correspondence, 1960
Box 4
Folder 4
Woodger Correspondence, 1961
Box 4
Folder 5
Woodger Correspondence, 1962
Box 4
Folder 6
Lindenmayer Correspondence, 1957-1985
Box 4
Folder 8
Photo from Joanne Werts
Box 4
Folder 9
Misc. Correspondence, 1957-1966
Box 4
Folder 10
 

Historical Note

John R. Gregg (1916-2009) was a Biological Science Professor Emeritus at Duke University. After earning an undergraduate degree from the University of Alabama and his PhD from Princeton University, Gregg served as a professor in the Duke University Zoology department from 1957 to his retirement in 1986. During his time at Duke, Gregg served as the acting chair of the Zoology department chair from 1958-1959 and as director of graduate studies from1968-1971. Gregg authored 33 publications during his academic career including two books, The Language of Taxonomy (1954) and Form and Strategy (1963). His work on taxonomic systems in The Language of Taxonomy led to the development of the "Gregg Paradox".

During the summer of 1967, he led the Undergraduate Institute for Theoretical Biology sponsored by NASA. During his career, Gregg collaborated closely with British biologist Joseph Henry Woodger, the developer of the influential Axiomatic Method.In addition to his scientific work, Gregg was extremely passionate about archery and donated his collection of antique bows and other artifacts to the Smithsonian Museum.


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Provenance

Transfer; October 22, 2012

Processing Information

Processed by Elizabeth J. Hannigan, July 2015