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Guide to the "Woman: the World Over" glass lantern slides lecture set

Summary

Collection consists of a commercially-produced set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides entitled "Woman: The World Over," published in 1901 by Riley Brothers in Bradford, England. The original printed booklet accompanying the set lists 53 slides in all, and contains detailed lecture-format captions. The women in the portraits represent nations around the world. Subjects include women of different classes; married women and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, with children, and in roles which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. Other slides show women working in agricultural, service, and industrial settings, and gambling and climbing mountains. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters of the Women's Christian Temperance Union. Lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, and changing social norms as the 20th century begins. All titles are original, as is the slide order. Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

Collection Details

Collection Number
RL.11535
Title
"Woman: the World Over" glass lantern slides lecture set
Extent
49 items, 1 box; 1 pamphlet binder
Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Language
Materials in English

Collection Overview

Collection consists of a commercially produced, nearly complete set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides measuring 3 1/4 inches square (83 x 83 mm). The original printed booklet accompanying the set bears the full title, "Woman: the world over. A lecture to accompany a series of 54 photographic transparencies for the optical lantern." The price appearing on the booklet is sixpence.

The booklet lists 53 slides in this set, and contains detailed lecture-format captions which would be read aloud as the slides were projected. The series is incomplete: numbers 28, 47, 48, 51, 53, and 54 are not present. Titles are also printed along the mount edges of each slide but are obscured in a few cases by black repair tape. All titles are original, as is the slide order. The titles and lecture script contain historical terms and language that may be offensive to modern-day audiences.

The slides and lecture notes were originally arranged in six series, retained in this description: Woman in Society; The Domestic Woman; Woman in Subjection; Emancipated Woman; Woman the Breadwinner; and Angelic Woman.

The women in the portraits represent races, cultures and nations around the world, among which British Guiana, China, Iceland, India, Japan, Netherlands, the Philippines, Russia, Switzerland, Tonga, Tunisia, and the U.S. There are portraits of women with high social status, married women, and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, women with children, and in roles of subjugation which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. A few images include men.

The series "Woman the Breadwinner" includes agricultural, craft, and industrial scenes, and a slide of women nurses attending to patients. The "Emancipated Woman" series includes an actress, a group of nurses, and women mountaineering. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters for the Women's Christian Temperance Union from 1892 to 1926. Titles are present on the edges of most of the glass slide mounts, and are listed in full in the booklet.

The booklet's lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, as well as changing social norms as the 20th century begins. The series ends with romantic images of ideal women, chiefly through the lens of courtship and beauty. Most of the missing slides are from this group.

The set held by the Rubenstein is numbered 1239 in the lecture booklet. There is no date on either the slides or the booklet, but the Women's Temple in Chigago, completed in 1892, provides the earliest date. A slide entitled "Wife of the Khedive" helps provide the latest date: the Egyptian title of "Khedive" was last used in 1914. The Lucerna Magic Lantern Web Resource (viewed online November 8 2017) gives the publisher as the Riley Brothers of Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and the publication date as 1901.

Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

Using These Materials

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The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

More copyright and citation information

How to Cite

[Identification of item], "Woman: The World Over" glass lantern slides lecture set, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Contents of the Collection

1. Woman in Society

All titles are original, as is the slide order.

Woman, the world over [Title slide]

Title's punctuation differs slightly from cover of lecture booklet accompanying slide set. Image is taken from the slide in the collection, "A Kaffir Belle."

Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-01
A Russian lady
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-02
A Greek lady
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-03
A lady of Iceland
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-04
A Philippino lady
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-05
A Brahmin lady - high caste
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-06
A Japanese lady
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-07
The wife of the Khedive

A note in booklet says "Till 1914 then was Sultan."

Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-08
A lady of Tunis
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-09

2. The Domestic Woman

All titles are original, as is the slide order.

Wives of a dusky potentate
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-10
The Dutchman's frau
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-11
Interior of a Dutch house
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-12
Japanese lady at her toilette
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-13
Chinese mother and children
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-14
Women "grinding at the mill"
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-15
Syrian woman baking
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-16
Arab women
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-17
Kaffir mothers and children

The adjective "Kaffir" was widely used in 19th and 20th century South Africa as a pejorative term for black Africans, particularly Bantu people. The term was also used for a Sri Lankan population brought to the island by the Portuguese in the 16th century. In this case the term was and still is used as a non-derogatory, self-identifying ethnic term.

Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-18
Dinah and her baby
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-19

3. Woman in Subjection

All titles are original, as is the slide order.

Wife of a sheik
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-20
A woman of Tunis
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-21
Graves of man and woman - Tunis
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-22
Bedouin woman
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-23
Women of Turkey
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-24
A "slavey" in British Guiana
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-25
Women of the Sahara
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-26

4. Emancipated Woman

All titles are original, as is the slide order.

Women's Temple - Chicago
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-27
Mountaineering
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-28
A Japanese actress

A negative number appears in the image.

Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-29
A tea party in Hawaii
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-30
Christian man and woman - Abeokuta [Nigeria]

A negative number appears in the image.

Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-31

5. Woman the Breadwinner

All titles are original, as is the slide order.

A hospital nurse
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-32
Picking hops
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-33
Factory hands
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-34
Swiss laceworker
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-35
Haymaking in Russia
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-36
Market women - Madeira
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-37
Hulling rice in the Philippines

A negative number appears in the image.

Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-38
Washing clothes in the Italian Lakes
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-39
A darkey washerwoman
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-40

6. Angelic Woman

All titles are original, as is the slide order.

A Kaffir belle

The adjective "Kaffir" was widely used in 19th and 20th century South Africa as a pejorative term for black Africans, particularly Bantu people. The term was also used for a Sri Lankan population brought to the island by the Portuguese in the 16th century. In this case the term was and still is used as a non-derogatory, self-identifying ethnic term.

Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-41
A sweet Norwegian
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-42
A dark-eyed Spaniard
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-43
Courting window in Spain
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-44
Spooning in Russia
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-45
A Cuban belle
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-46
Tongan beauties
Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-47
A Jewish couple

Slide is black-and-white, with no tinting present.

Box 1
Image RL.11535-GS-48
 


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Provenance

The "Woman: the World Over" glass lantern slide lecture set was received by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection in 2016.

Processing Information

Processed and encoded by Paula Jeannet Mangiafico, November 2017.

Other Notes

The glass slides measure 3 1/4 x 3 1/4 and are composed of collodion images sandwiched between glass and bound with black tape. With the exception of one black-and-white slide, they are expertly hand-colored, probably with oil-based commercial paints. A few have cracks along the corners or sides.

Fragile: Please handle with care. Avoid exposure to light and heat.